madaboutcheetah

Botswana to ban all hunting ...... FINAL ANSWER?

35 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

What photo tourist will want to go into thick bush where Elephants have been hunted? Do you want to be charged up and the down the center of the mopane veldt??? Certainly not me!!! After maybe another 10 years when the wildlife settles down, will be nice........

Edited by madaboutcheetah

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What photo tourist will want to go into thick bush where Elephants have been hunted? Do you want to be charged up and the down the center of the mopane veldt??? Certainly not me!!! After maybe another 10 years when the wildlife settles down, will be nice........

 

No this is not the case,Jochen was with me on my last trip and we saw 100"s elephants and not one showed any form of aggression at all.

 

In fact Jochen got to 3 or 4 meters from a big bull that walked right up to him with no sign of fear or aggression,this area has not been hunted for some years I believe ,cannot see any sign of this and the elephants are the first to show changes.

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Posted (edited)

Don't exaggerate, André. It was 5 meters. :D

 

Indeed the place looked great.

 

What Graeme says is not entirely true.

- Plenty of relaxed elephants (and we're talking big bulls here)

- plenty of other species and easy to see (kudu, impala, giraffe etc ...we even saw a sable). We saw no cats, but we were only there for one day, and we did hear them at night.

- Nogaatsa was dry at the end of the dy season, but other waterholes had water (where pumps were in operation). In comparison; the place - at least at the end of dry season - looks very similar to the waterholes in Savuti before the channel was flowing again. And according to the farmers from Pandamatenga getting water is no issue. Well, it's deep underground, but 80% of all attempts result in water, if I remember correctly.

- Not too bushy at all. Certainly less bushy than Kruger private reserves. OK, there's big mopane patches but this is elephant country after all.

 

The place must look absolutely magnificent in the 4-5 months after rainy season, when all animals flock back from Kazuma. I'll know soon enough, as I'm going back there.

 

Note that there's a huge grassy plain on CG5 as well. That's Cheetah country right there, Hari. But I guess no one ever looked at it.

 

I think Graeme is exaggerating. For a reason, of course.

 

Ciao,

 

J.

Edited by Jochen
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Will enough photo tourists do so though in the meantime bringing local communities the same revenue as from hunting? If they aren't guaranteed that income, will they not revert to other means?

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Posted (edited)

GW ,people have a misconception about bringing revenue to a specific community,I know this first hand ,as when we hunted in Zim in the past ,we bought licences from the game dept for the game to be hunted,now does this money really go to the local community,this case Matuodona area or do they use it for other purposes?

 

I know the fees paid to me by my clients did not,except I did employ one or two locals to help out while I was in that area,and the same will apply in Botswana,all licence fees go to the government whether for hunting or photographic,except if this tract of land you are useing is tribal land,such as the Khwai community trust land,here there is a spin off for hunting and photografic.But not all areas are tribal trusts ,such as ours,is not,this area belongs to us for 55years on a lease from the Chobe Land Board .we pay an annual fee to the CHB direct what they do with this money is anybodies guess ,although it is trust land,but it is not contested,like Khwai were they live on the trust land its self,our land has nobody living anywhere near there.for at least 70km.

 

Tribal land such as Khwai,is not always a safe way to invest into a camp,reason is the trust elders always are present to see if you run the camp in a correct and proper manor,which is a good thing,but this also leads to the elders to take over your camp once they see things are going well ,this has happened before , more than once.

I know of three camps to have suffered this fate,two have been sorted out ,but the third camp is still closed .This should not be allowed to happen,1000's $$ are spent developing a camp and then you still are not sure if tomorrow you are still the boss.

 

So whatever people may think about money being filtered back to the locals, is not always the case.

Yes we would employ local staff once we get up and running,this most or all operators do.

Edited by A&M

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The ban is all well and good, though according to people I spoke with today, there is a lot of Ivory poaching already along the buffalo fence and in areas where the hunters have vacated.

 

Hardly a positive result.....

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Russell the BDF are taking care of those culprits,shot a few 2 weeks ago along the buffalo fence.

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http://www.tourismupdate.co.za/article/124624/Wilderness-Safaris-new-camp-set-to-open-in-Botswana?utm_source=Now Media Newsletters&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=TU Daily Mail&utm_term=http:%2F%2Fwww.tourismupdate.co.za%2F%2Farticle%2F124624%2FWilderness-Safaris-new-camp-set-to-open-in-Botswana

 

Very interesting news - since Calitz Safaris used to be one of the most prolific ele hunting outfitters in Botswana.

 

This news is welcome & 4-5 years after the fact, it would be great to get a list of all the former hunting concessions that have now moved over to photo concessions. 

 

There have been lots of new camps opened this past year, I suspect most of them in ex-hunting concessions. 

 

Those of you with more knowledge, please update us on the latest status of these ex-hunting concessions.

 

 

 

 

 

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And I hardly think that SA, Zim and Namibia can claim better (fewer) poaching events than Bots over this same period.

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It's probably taken that long because approvals and plans take forever to go through the extensive procedural aspects .........

 

Think about regular tourist visas for Botswana and their procedural aspects (Gulp) ....... 

 

 

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