madaboutcheetah

Botswana to ban all hunting ...... FINAL ANSWER?

54 posts in this topic

That's fantastic! Does this make them the first African country to do this?

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That's fantastic! Does this make them the first African country to do this?

 

No. For once, Kenya banned trophy hunting back in 1977 (whether this has been a good move or a bad move is the subject of a lot of discussions in Kenya).

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Posted (edited)

Jolly good,at last !!! Hope they stick to this now.This should make our area at least 5 times larger now. :lol:

Edited by A&M

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So what moves have been made to turn over all the hunting blocks to photographic tourism? What about local communities, how will they be involved? Which companies will be investing in these new areas? Will the hunting companies turn to photographic revenue, or move elsewhere?

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Not sure about all the areas,I know the Bottle pan area has stayed with the hunting company and they have already started driling bore holes to increase their water to last longer,CH 6 and 8 I have not heard what is going to happen there so far ,but will find out tomorrow.

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This can be found in several places:

 

Hunting is officially banned in Botswana from 2013, except for plains game on game ranches and a few elephants that will be auctioned outside the wilderness areas in the cattle areas.

 

There are only 2 areas that will still have limited quota for 2013, CH 1 and NG 41.

 

Safaris with Butler &Holbrow Safaris in the Chobe Enclave CH1/2 will continue unchanged through the end of 2013; Safaris with Calitz Hunting Safaris in Mababe NG 41 will continue through the end of 2017.

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This can be found in several places:

 

Hunting is officially banned in Botswana from 2013, except for plains game on game ranches and a few elephants that will be auctioned outside the wilderness areas in the cattle areas.

 

There are only 2 areas that will still have limited quota for 2013, CH 1 and NG 41.

 

Safaris with Butler &Holbrow Safaris in the Chobe Enclave CH1/2 will continue unchanged through the end of 2013; Safaris with Calitz Hunting Safaris in Mababe NG 41 will continue through the end of 2017.

 

So hunting is not banned in Botswana. They should ban it outright so we can see what happens.

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Here are a couple more questions, 1 from a point that was raised on the Botswana Govt Facebook page here.

 

How will this affect the San bushmen of the Kalahari? Another excuse to push them out?

 

Over population of elephants: so will the Govt be undertaking culling, or expensive sterilisation to control numbers?

 

Is this just "trophy hunting", will local communities such as the San be allowed to hunt?

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This will not affect the San people I believe,going there next month and find out first hand from them what they have heard or been told.

 

As far as the elephant go,Zimbabwe will never stop hunting,so this will take care of lots of elephant that migrate across to Kazuma and Hwange and Matetsi areas.I have also found the elephant are moving much futher south than previous years.there is still a lot of open space down south,only problem is more fences as well.

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South Africa will also or cannot ban hunting ,as 90% of hunting is done on private land,as long as the farmers comply with the nature concervation laws regards to their fences and facillities there will always be trophy hunting here.

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Here are a couple more questions, 1 from a point that was raised on the Botswana Govt Facebook page here.

 

Over population of elephants: so will the Govt be undertaking culling, or expensive sterilisation to control numbers?

 

 

I think people are under the impression that trophy hunting reduces or controls elephant populations - but there is no way that enough hunting permits are issued to make the slightest dent in elephant populations.

 

Botswana have their new (in fact old tried and tested) method of sustainable poaching that takes care of the elephant populations.

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I'm copying in the following statement,

 

STATEMENT FROM THE BOTSWANA WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION

 

The Botswana Wildlife Management Association (BWMA) welcomes the recent decision by the Government of the Republic of Botswana to extend concession leases for multi-purpose (photo and hunting) use for a further year for the following concessions:

 

CT1 : Destination South Safaris Contact: Jeff Rann

CT2: Johan Calitz Safaris Contact : Johan Calitz

CT3 : Chobe Fish Eagle Contact: Duncan Britton

NG 43 : Kgori Safaris Contact: Jim Van Rensburg

NG 47 : Safaris Botswana Bound Contact: Graeme Pollock

CH12 : Bottle Pan Safaris Contact: Mike Murray

 

This extended period will allow for continued dialogue with the Ministry of Environment Wildlife and Tourism (MEWT) on national conservation strategies and to facilitate the transition of these areas from multiple use (hunting and photographic) to non-consumptive tourism.

 

A verbal statement was made at a recent meeting with tourism authorities that all hunting in Government concessions would cease by the year 2014: however, the BWMA do not have this statement officially - our Government has continually stated that areas with existing leases will not be affected until lease expiry, so community-based concession areas,NG41 (Mababe) and CH1/2 (Chobe Enclave), which are operated by Johan Calitz Safaris and Butler & Holbrow Safaris respectively, should not be affected by the statement made in respect of the 2014 cut-off.

 

The BWMA has been in negotiations with the MEWT since 2008 in an effort to rationalize the change in land use : consumptive tourism plays a critical role in securing remote wildlife areas against poaching, human and livestock encroachment, fire and supporting community-based livelihoods. With these pivotal factors in mind, the BWMA will continue to collaborate and lobby Government to recognize how hunting succeeds in maintaining wildlife functionality and habitat conservation in Botswana.

 

For any further information on bookings hunts in the above concession areas, please contact the operators listed above or contact the BWMA Secretariat on email debbie@mochaba.net .

 

Please note I removed the email addresses from the above statement. Matt.

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I see an email address at the very end ...

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Yes, that is of the secretary of the BWMA, not each individual.

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Thanks for this Safarichick,they banned elephant hunting some 30 years ago,and look at the impact that had,best elephant herds in Africa.

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I've spoken with Graeme Pollock who is listed in the above press release from The Botswana Wildlife Management Association and he has given me the below comment.

 

Matt our assoc has been requested to comment to local newspapers here so do you mind if I send the same info?

 

Matt but briefly:

 

We all agree that the best land use is priority - hence no resistance from us when the Okavango Delta was converted. In the Delta - photo tourism is the best land use - if it was a choice of one against the other! We say the two can and do run in parallel and maximise benefits to conservation and local communities. But in the marginal eastern areas, the best land use is hunting - this is due to the east not being conducive to photo tourism based on the scenery and lack of plains game. Yes there are elephants and buffalo but the bush is so thick you cannot see for more than 25 meters!

 

Fifteen years ago when the areas were put out on tender not one photo tourism company bid on the areas as they were remote and unattractive and seriously lacking in wildlife. Hunting companies invested heavily in developing boreholes, roads and infrastructure. We hunted according to strict guidelines such as no shooting into herds and no hunting near pumped waterholes. The management costs of these areas are excessive - we spend over P300.000-00 a year on diesel alone, never mind staff and repairs and maintenance. Bear in mind the fact that the ever increasing biomass of elephants is causing an ecological catastrophe, so the supply of water in the marginal areas does provide extra range land for elephant dispersal. But this requires substantial investment - which low or medium priced tourism cannot afford.

 

The closure of hunting will affect nearly 5000 household incomes, and these are the rural, unskilled workers who have little opportunity or choice. The loss of tax revenue by government is approx P105 million and the country's economy P300 million. The naive will think photo tourism will replace this - but only those who know the area - know the reality - hence HATAB members stating they will not tender on these areas as they are not viable or conducive to photo tourism.

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Matt,

 

Thanks for posting Graeme Pollock's view.

 

As much as I would love to see photographic operations everywhere, his remarks on certain areas being unsuitable to photographic tourism make perfect sense to me.

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I have a few thoughts on Graeme Pollock's comments, but it may be a bit too early. One is that watching what kind of tourism is successful currently, the government should be aiding anyone that wants to run with it, like Andre (A&M). The self drive is begging for more campsites, new routes, adventurous, off the beaten track, even a different route that isn't on pavement. That could assist in employing quite a few more people, people that could make the transition from hunting camps to photographic camps. Sure HATAB doesn't want this. They can't make a lot of $$ in this type of tourism, but others would like to give it a go. You can bet if campsites opened, HATAB and BOGA mobile operators would use these remote off the beaten path routes.

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Have we a map, either that we can link to, or have copyright permission to publish highlighting these areas?

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Not sure about copyright issues on the 2nd map.

 

Looking at the 2nd map, the Eastern area we are talking about is North of the Nata-Maun highway, not national parks or game reserves, but controlled hunting areas on that map. Andre will have a lot more information on this. Not sure if some of that land not designated is available or is owned by private parties.

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Robbie you are correct in what you are saying,but so is Graeme Pollock to a point.I know most of the eastern areas very well,do not agree with GP about lack of plains game,seen plenty kudu, sable, roan,tsessebe CH 5 I am referring to hear. ,there are certain areas or blocks in the east that have lots of game from time to time,lets not forget this is a huge area,the game is not tied to the trees,hunters are spoilt with the other more scenic open areas were they can drive up to the animals .Here in the east hardly any roads,one has to foot slog,like we did in Zim, Matusodona area. Lots and lots of buffalo ,elephant,and lion, leopard etc.

 

With more water holes in our area,game would be able to stay longer during the dry months,also going to be a new route to Savuti via Poha gate.And as Robbie say self drive and mobile safaries will happen in time.

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Posted (edited)

As far as lots of brush and trees, if elephants hang around year round because of the water holes, they will thin out a forest in no time.

Edited by luangwablondes

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Robbie this is already taking place in some areas,yes there are areas with thick bush,and tall grass,but this also serves as a safe haven for the animals.The game I have seen on my various trips have been fairly tame,not skittish at all,they are also not used to traffic,as hardly anybody ever goes to this area.

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