Anita

Lets see your stars and night sky

260 posts in this topic

Excellent @@KaingU Lodge!

 

For star trails, remember to expose a bit less than for these, otherwise the stars become a bit overpowering.

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@@KaingU Lodge

 

Neat!! Did you just use a torch to light the foreground?

 

Sorry Geoff - delayed response! Yes, a tiny keychain type LED torch on the foreground.

 

 

11081194_867137976676877_651016229570137

 

 

South Luangwa last weekend.

 

f2.0

30 sec exposure

ISO 800

22mm focal length.

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Posted (edited)

@@KaingU Lodge, I particularly like these that almost look like they were taken almost during daytime. I presume this is done under a nearly-full moon?

 

Perhaps 1/2moon as about the best time, as this is possibly a little too bright?

 

I have also recently read a very interesting article (https://photographylife.com/photographing-the-milky-way) where the writer mentions that he feels focusing on the foreground is not sufficiently accurate, so he focuses on the foreground for the "lit" shot, then on the stars, and then stacks the images together. I presume that, except for star trails, he would have to clone out or otherwie remove the stars from the foreground image?

 

Here is my latest attempt, not really safari though...

 

This is a five-image stack including two with lightning and three with vehicles passing.

post-24763-0-55174800-1428335530_thumb.jpg

 

Matt, Nikon D7000 + old manual-focus Nikkor 50mm f2 AI-S lens. 10 second exposures at f16 and ISO100.

Edited by Peter Connan

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Very nice @@Peter Connan.

 

Yep, moon was out.

 

I must give stacking a try - maybe tonight if the unseasonable cloud would lift. The path the lightning is taking in your shots is incredible.

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@@KaingU Lodge, if you do stack, I recommend StarStax. It's freeware and very easy to use!

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Not sure if this counts, it's just a little moon...

 

post-24763-0-85333600-1428685548_thumb.jpg

 

Handheld with Nikon D7000 and 500f4 + 1.4 Teleconverter.

1/250th, f8, ISO250.

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Posted (edited)

Sunset, crecent Moon and Venus, at Namiri Plains Camp, Serengeti NP, Tanzania late March 2015.

(Nikon D700 + 50mm f/1.8, wide open, 1/125sec, ISO 900)

 

gallery_49063_1236_115212.jpg

Edited by Scott8586
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A couple from our recent trip. The first one with lightening taken in Karoo NP South Africa and the second at Urikaruus in Kgalagadi TP. I bought the app 'Sky Guide' for my Ipad and its great helping you find objects in the sky. Learned a lot and could see we got the large and small magellanic clouds in the second shot. Pen

post-17162-0-56743100-1429367918_thumb.jpg

post-17162-0-03460400-1429367947_thumb.jpg

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post-49296-0-33646500-1429899915_thumb.jpg

~ @penolva:

 

Stunning!

Thank you for explaining how you used your iPad to locate this.

It's highly welcome to see such astronomical images in Safaritalk.

Tom K.

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post-49296-0-01109700-1429900060_thumb.jpg

~ @@Peter Connan:

 

What a TERRIFIC “little moon”!

I'm especially grateful for the technical settings.

When I enjoy an image like this, I find myself wondering what technical settings were involved.

Very nice — Thanks!

Tom K.

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@@Game Warden, this one's just for you:

 

The southern cross:

post-24763-0-42306300-1430887109_thumb.jpg

Nikon D7000 + 18-70mm f3.5-4.5 @50mm, 5 seconds @ f4.5 and ISO800, tripod.

 

post-24763-0-09629100-1430887068_thumb.jpg

Nikon D7000 + 12-24mm f4 @ 12mm, 100 exposures of 30 seconds @ f4 and 1600ISO, tripod and cable release.

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Stunning @@Peter Connan!

 

In the merged image is that a shooting star at the sort of 11 o'clock position from south?

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@@KaingU Lodge, I believe so but did not see it at the time. I believe if it was either an aircraft or a sattellite, the streak would be all the way across?

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Here is one of the moon that i shot recently

ISO 200, 600 mm +TC1.7, D3s, 1/100 sec, f 11

gallery_45142_1255_202874.jpg

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post-49296-0-48029200-1431116170_thumb.jpg

~ @Earthian:

 

What a beautiful Moon portrait!

The clarity and lighting are superb.

The crater shadows on the right side are especially impressive.

I'm so glad that you posted that in Safaritalk.

Tom K.

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post-49296-0-15491000-1431116437_thumb.jpg

~ @@KaingU Lodge:

 

What I love about your image is that it portrays a familiar scene in a seemingly unearthly way.

One walking about at night wouldn't see this accumulated luminosity, yet it's actually what is there.

Such creative night photography is highly inspiring.

Many thanks for sharing it on Safaritalk.

Tom K.

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Not entirely happy with the interruption in the middle.... if you watch closely.

 

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OK, let me show you our first attempts to photograph Milky Way and night sky; the most complicated (and not achieved) part was to find when the lens is in focus.

 

1. Milky Way over the Barchan Dune Lodge

 

2. Night sky over Kalahari Tented Camp floodlighted waterhole with thunderstorm in background

post-47185-0-37683200-1431714868_thumb.jpg

post-47185-0-68485900-1431714931_thumb.jpg

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OK, let me show you our first attempts to photograph Milky Way and night sky; the most complicated (and not achieved) part was to find when the lens is in focus.

 

1. Milky Way over the Barchan Dune Lodge

 

2. Night sky over Kalahari Tented Camp floodlighted waterhole with thunderstorm in background

 

~ @@xelas

 

Those are excellent night sky images.

I've failed in all of my attempts as I never mastered nighttime focus.

Whatever you're doing, it looks great to me!

Thank you.

Tom K.

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Posted (edited)

OK, let me show you our first attempts to photograph Milky Way and night sky; the most complicated (and not achieved) part was to find when the lens is in focus.

 

1. Milky Way over the Barchan Dune Lodge

 

2. Night sky over Kalahari Tented Camp floodlighted waterhole with thunderstorm in background

Very impressive :) Edited by penolva

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@@xelas

amazing pictures

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@@Tom Kellie, @@penolva, @Earthian: you are just too kind!! But your words will keep us on the "path to the focus", so to speak.

 

These were the hardware and settings applied:

Nikon D610, Nikkor AF-S 20 mm f1.8;

WB 3570 K, ISO 3200, shutter 25 sec, aperture f2.0

 

I have toyed around just a little bit with ViewNX 2, yet SOOC JPEG looks very much like the posted ones.

 

I should cover the viewfinder next time. Pre-focused the lens to infinity during the daylight. Put some weight below the tripod. Sit still during the exposure time. Lessons learned for next time :) !

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These were the hardware and settings applied:

Nikon D610, Nikkor AF-S 20 mm f1.8;

WB 3570 K, ISO 3200, shutter 25 sec, aperture f2.0

 

I should cover the viewfinder next time. Pre-focused the lens to infinity during the daylight. Put some weight below the tripod. Sit still during the exposure time.

 

~ @@xelas

 

What you've so kindly explained above is super-useful to a would-be night photographer like me.

My own efforts at star photography in East Africa have been far less than satisfactory.

Your settings information above and your excellent attitude are an inspiration for me!

Many Thanks!

Tom K.

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post-49296-0-01546000-1431761475_thumb.jpg

~ @@Peter Connan

 

What a great night sky image!

The deep cobalt blue night sky is a color which I especially like. It's almost an indigo blue.

I like the rooflines of the structure, too.

When I first saw this image I didn't comment. Today I looked at it again and must tell you how much I like it.

Tom K.

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@@Tom Kellie, @@penolva, @Earthian: you are just too kind!! But your words will keep us on the "path to the focus", so to speak.

 

These were the hardware and settings applied:

Nikon D610, Nikkor AF-S 20 mm f1.8;

WB 3570 K, ISO 3200, shutter 25 sec, aperture f2.0

 

I have toyed around just a little bit with ViewNX 2, yet SOOC JPEG looks very much like the posted ones.

 

I should cover the viewfinder next time. Pre-focused the lens to infinity during the daylight. Put some weight below the tripod. Sit still during the exposure time. Lessons learned for next time :) !

 

To help focus what is quite useful is to ramp up the ISO as far as possible and use live view (zoomed in) to manually adjust focus until the stars are as clear as possible. Then go back to a more 'normal' ISO for the actual shots.

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