Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Safaridude

An update on the progress of the Ishaqbini hirola sanctuary

21 posts in this topic

Just a small update here...(from my conversation with Ian Craig)

 

The construction of the hirola sanctuary is going well. It continues to have the full support of the Ishaqbini community.

 

The fencing is well on its way. The actual closure and capture target is early to mid August.

 

A group of 8 hirolas have voluntarily moved into the sanctuary (partially fenced now). The predator population is still healthy (there were 5 cheetahs inside the sanctuary area, signs of leopard kills inside and out, as well as lions and wild dogs in the greater Ishaqbini area.

 

The long-rains (March - May) were terrible... the Ishaqbini area having received only 3 or 4 downpours. Strangely, just further down toward the coast, rains were plentiful, so the majority of the cattle are over that way now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the update.

 

If I recall correctly short rains were very good and plentiful instead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to read some good news. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Encouraging news. Any further updates on security and possible tourists endeavours for the next couple of years or is that a bit far off to consider for now?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Twaffle, we did not discuss those issues. But I personally think it's possible in the next few years.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has Ian got any photos he can share Safaridude?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will ask

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photos courtesy of Ian Craig, including the last photo which shows the 8 hirolas who voluntarily moved into the sanctuary recently...

 

gallery_6003_644_17604.jpg

 

gallery_6003_644_54847.jpg

 

gallery_6003_644_17782.jpg

 

gallery_6003_644_27923.jpg

 

gallery_6003_644_9469.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great thanks Safaridude. So when completely fenced, any predators will be rounded up from inside and translocated, or be persuaded to move elsewhere? What about other wildlife - is this an area which has any migratory routes? Is the fear that it may well become genetically isolated, or is the hirola population large enough for this not to happen?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

The current plan is to have some buffalo, topi, gerenuk, lesser kudu, reticulated giraffe, and oryx in the sanctuary. Yes, the predators will be asked to leave. Otherwise, they will be trapped and relocated. The sanctuary is a small piece of a larger conservation area, so there are no migratory route concerns. The sanctuary should have at least 30-40 hirolas (maybe more). That number is usually enough to mitigate inbreeding, but keep in mind that you can easily release animals from the sanctuary and/or recruit new ones from outside the sanctuary to ensure genetic flow.

Edited by Safaridude

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the ribbons on the fence, very maridadi! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently the ribbons are for the giraffes there. They kept walking into the fence!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Such a simple solution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Incredibly great news!

 

The hirola capture operation is complete. There are now 48 hirolas inside the sanctuary (24 of them went in under their own volition, and the other 24 were captured). No fatalities so far... which is absolutely incredible. There are now a few topis, oryx, lesser kudu, buffalo and gerenuk inside the sanctuary as well. 6 cheetahs and 3 hyenas have been removed from the sanctuary. So, here we go... the hirolas just has to start breeding. Apparently, some of them appear to be heavily pregant and doing fine.

 

A full report by KWS is upcoming.

 

We the Safaritalk members can all take pride in the awareness and fundraising campaign that made this possible.

Edited by Safaridude
4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We need some intrepid roving reporters to get on scene...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There will be several reports coming out shortly, I am sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uplifting indeed. Just the sort of news the Game Warden needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic news!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fence seems to be jumpable for leopards and lions, but I am hoping that I am wrong.

 

I suppose that there are no elephants around ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fence seems to be jumpable for leopards and lions, but I am hoping that I am wrong.

 

I suppose that there are no elephants around ...

 

I'm hoping you are wrong too! Can you clarify this, Safaridude? Not much anyone can do against a determined ele, but I am sure they must have considered the fence height and design carefully.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fence seems to be jumpable for leopards and lions, but I am hoping that I am wrong.

 

I suppose that there are no elephants around ...

 

I'm hoping you are wrong too! Can you clarify this, Safaridude? Not much anyone can do against a determined ele, but I am sure they must have considered the fence height and design carefully.

 

Sorry... been away. There are not many elephants there. I don't think lions can jump over the fence. The only potential issue is leopard. They will continue to monitor the sanctuary for predators, obviously. What is remarkable about the whole Ishaqbini area is how productive the ecosystem is. Even though there will be some 100+ ungulates (hirola, giraffe, topi, oryx, lesser kudu, gerenuk, etc.) inside the sanctuary, there's still a lot of game in the greater area, so predators wouldn't necessarily be pressured to hone in on the sanctuary for food.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


© 2006 - 2017 www.safaritalk.net - Talking Safaris and African Wildlife Conservation since 2006. Passionate about Africa.