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inyathi

Reintroduction of Gaur in Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve

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While looking for information on the reintroduction of gaur into Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve I came across this report which I thought might be of interest. It seems to suggest that this project may lead to other reintroductions in Madhya Pradesh, which would be good. Though I find it a little worrying that they have gone ahead and with the reintroduction without knowing for certain what caused the original gaur to become extinct in Bandhavgarh, I hope they know what they’re doing and the project is ultimately successful.

 

Reintroduction of Gaur (Bos gaurus gaurus) in Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve, Madhya Pradesh India

 

From what I've read elsewhere it now seems that 18 gaur have already been released in to the park and further 31 have just been released in to a boma just last month.

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Thanks for this - Yes, I think this was a successful program. From what i hear, only one death amongst the Gaur. Rest survived - I think all of the gaur have been released now. Started in 2010 this program.

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Posted (edited)

just a comment. Would be great if the gaur could be reintroduced in corbett np as welll.

Edited by Savannenfuchs
typo
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@Savannenfuchs Welcome to ST.

 

After the disastrous attempt to reintroduce hard-ground barasingha deer from Kahna to Bandavgarh back in the 80s that resulted in all of the animals dying, India pretty much gave up on the Idea of translocating large animals long distances. However since they moved these gaurs with South African assistance, they have carried out other successful translocations including of the aforementioned barasingha, in the course of doing so they have received significant training from their South African counterparts. Besides this training they have established good contacts in South Africa where moving large came is common place, so Indian conservationists can call upon their South African friends for advice and actual help if need be. The consequence of all of this is that they are now moving wildlife in a way that they simply weren’t before.

 

It would be great to put gaurs back into Corbett NP and I would guess also Dudhwa which as far as I can find out online doesn’t have any. This would though be a difficult and expensive operation, looking at a distribution map for gaur the nearest population would be either in Madhya Pradesh or perhaps in Nepal although I don’t know how well they are doing in Nepal. Whatever the case these animals which are certainly not small, would wherever they come from, have to be transported a very long distance to get to them to Corbett. I don’t know how relations are between India and Nepal but if they had gaur to spare (I very much doubt that they do) and these animals are closer then what would be great would be to offer to exchange some for some wild water buffalos from Kaziranga. The buffalo population in Nepal in Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve is very small and ideally in need of new blood.  The Nepalis should move some buffalo cows from there to Bardia or Shuklaphanta along with some bulls imported from Kaziranga in India if possible.

 

The idea was suggest at one time that rhinos should be reintroduced to Corbett but I think this has been entirely rejected, as the area of suitable grassland habitat at Dhikala and elsewhere is just too small to support a viable population so they would require very intensive management to maintain them in the park.

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Thanks for the informative post @inyathi - it's very encouraging to hear about conservationists and wildlife biologists in different countries training each other and sharing knowledge and efforts. 

 

 

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@offshorebirder Thanks, I think collaborations between different countries like this are very important, I think some of the vets in Africa who do tthis sort of thing are so passionate about wildlife and what they do that they would jump at the chance to work in India or other countries  in Asia. Of course back in the 80s when the Forest Department in Madhya Pradesh were attempting to move the barasingha or when rhinos were being moved from Assam assistance from people in South Afric a would have been impossible with Apartheid.  

 

I think the reintroduction of thes gaur to Bandavgarh is very important because India being such a vast country is a major stronghold for the species and has the largest and I would assume best protected populations. Further east they’re not doing as well the usual combination of habitat destruction and poaching has reduced numbers considerably and there are now very few left in Malaysia, Laos and Vietnam, I would guess the biggest number is in Thailand and a few at least in north eastern Cambodia and maybe elsewhere in the country. I don’t know if anyone knows what the situation is in Burma or the far south of China in Yunnan or Tibet. There were thought to be three extant subspecies  but this has been revised down to two one in the Indian Subcontinent and the other in South East Asia with a sort of transition zone in the region of Assam and north east India. Apparently there was another now extinct subspecies living in Sri Lanka I would guess that a good case could be made for taking some Gaur from South India across the Palk Strait to Sri Lanka to re-establish them there in some of their national parks.

 

For those who like a bit of science I forgot to add the following to my last post  

 

Home Range, Habitat Use and Food Habits of Re-Introduced Gaur (Bos Gaurus Gaurus) in Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve, Central India

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Thanks @inyathi - I saw the same publication after doing some Google Searches your initial post stimulated. 

 

But the version I saw did not include photos - so thanks again.

 

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Thanks for informing this ..I find this info very useful being wildlife photographer.

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