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What Africa books have you bought recently?


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#41 kittykat23uk

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:37 PM

"Dirty Doug's disappearing, reappearing dogs" by Jo Dale, I have 3 copies now, two are slight misprints, have just reordered it again in the hope that it will get a perfect copy finally...
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#42 whorty1970

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 09:35 PM

Currently 1/2 way through 20 Chickens for a Saddle by Robyn Scott. A very nice book on growing up in Bots. 

 

The read before that was Bookey Peek's Beyond the Wild Wood (the 3rd book about her life on a Zim wildlife sanctuary). Opens your eyes up to corruption and the suffering of residents of this country once described as the breadbasket of Africa.


:D 

 

 

 


#43 Treepol

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 10:29 AM

Just finished Looking for Mrs Livingstone by Julie Davidson. I first heard of this book in a very short article in Travel Africa or Africa Geographic about 3 years ago, and was interested to see that it had been published recently.

Looking for Mrs Livingstone is a mixture of biography and travelogue - the author has researched the life of Mary Livingstone from the few remaining sources and has written an interesting biography blended with her own travels in the footsteps of the Livingstones. The first journey was to the site of the former Kuruman Mission in northern South Africa and the second is further north to the Chobe via the Boteti River and Linyanti following a dream to establish a mission at Makololo.

I enjoyed this book because I knew nothing of Livingstone's life before he became famous for walking across Africa (1853-56), returning to London as a hero. It was fascinating to find that the family had trekked through northwestern Botswana, an area that I have visited twice. I'll be checking with Ewan and Sallie Masson for their knowledge and thoughts on the 'Livingstone trail'.

This book brings alive the hardship that permeated the life of Mary Livingstone. Whether it was living at the isolated Kolobeng Mission Station in Southern Botswana, or barely escaping death on the trek to the Zambezi, or surviving 4 chilly winters in London supposedly with Livingstone's family - surviving on a stipend from the London Missionary Society, Mary Livingstone had a hard life. Victorian England did not welcome the unfashionable missionary from Africa.

The book was slow to start with, and I found the second half more interesting than the beginning. There is a quote from Tim Jeal (Livingstone's biographer) on the back cover that explains that insufficient records survive to support a full biography of Mary Livingstone, yet she lives (perhaps survives or exists are better words) in this book.

Edited by Treepol, 02 March 2013 - 10:29 AM.

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#44 VeeR

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 04:44 PM

Just finished "White Dog Fell from the Sky" by Eleanor Morse. I don't remember how I stumbled on this title but am so glad I purchased it.

Set for the most part in Botswana in the 1976, it also covers in graphic detail the apartheid prison system in South Africa and the plight of the San Bushman.

From the book jacket "Magic, friendship, the tragedy of apartheid and triumph of loyalty are recounted in poetic, powerful prose by the unconventional and intelligent writer. Shattering
and uplifting" Kuki Gallmann reviewed.

#45 JD5000

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 07:09 PM

hi .

i am trying to find a copy in the uk of a book that was in some of the lodges in laikipia,it was just called laikipia it was a coffee table type book .i did find a reference to it yesterday and i think it migth be retitled as' kenya the high country' .if anybody knows if this is the right book i would love to know as i only seem to be able to find it through an astralian website .

 

also tyring to read my way through every tourist travel book ever written about tanzania at the moment .

thanks

julie



#46 whorty1970

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 08:39 PM

20 Saddles finished, now on to "I Dream of Africa"


:D 

 

 

 


#47 SafariChick

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 09:25 PM

This year I've read

 

Place of Reeds by Caitlin Davies (interesting true story of English woman who moves to Botswana after falling in love with a Motswana man)

20 Chickens for a Saddle by Robyn Scott (very enjoyable memoir of growing up in Botswana)

Botswana Time by Will Randall (almost finished - amusing fish-out-of-water memoir of Englishman who ends up teaching in Botswana)

Guide to the Birds of East Africa (not an actual guide, but rather a light novel by Nicholas Drayson, which I loved)

A Carrion Death by Michael Stanley (detective story set in Botswana, enjoyable, have next one in series to read too)

 

I have Daphne Sheldrick's Love, Life and Elephants which I may read next ...


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#48 whorty1970

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 09:31 PM

20 Chickens for a Saddle by Robyn Scott (very enjoyable memoir of growing up in Botswana)

Botswana Time by Will Randall (almost finished - amusing fish-out-of-water memoir of Englishman who ends up teaching in Botswana)

2 in common.

 

Try Bookey Peek if you get a chance - her books are of a similar ilk.


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:D 

 

 

 


#49 SafariChick

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 09:49 PM

@whorty1970 cool, thanks, I will try her!


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#50 AKR1

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 02:42 AM

I just acquired a book I have been searching for some time- a 1925 edition of "Stalking Big Game with a Camera" by Marius Maxwell. Some amazing images given the time this was shot, an era when safari meant killing animals not photographing them. 

For anyone interested the text of the book is available below :

http://babel.hathitr...;seq=7;view=1up


Edited by AKR1, 17 March 2013 - 02:43 AM.


#51 whorty1970

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 09:27 PM

I need to head down Charing X Road and see if I can find some old books on Africa. Always something worth spending a few pennies on in those old musty shops 


:D 

 

 

 


#52 Game Warden

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 09:37 PM

Maybe Diagon Alley has a few gems? :)


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#53 madaboutcheetah

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 03:12 PM

Been reading "Battle for the President's Elephants" on the airplane last couple of days (going up and down to Delhi for work) ........ great read.  Really would like to get to Hwange to see the great work put in by Sharon Pincott!!!!


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#54 whorty1970

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 02:45 PM

Maybe Diagon Alley has a few gems? :)

 

@Game Warden - I actually drink in a pub in the area that they filmed the Diagon Alley cobbled streets for the first Harry Potter. The Lamb Tavern in Leadenhall Market  :rolleyes:  Not many books, but very nice pints of Youngs Ordinary ...  


:D 

 

 

 


#55 marg

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 07:24 PM

a few more titles...
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver a good reread
Three Weeks in December by Audrey Schulman
Colour Bar by Susan Collins mentioned previously, about Seretse Khama
The Fear by Peter Godwin Zimbabwe 2008
The Cowboy and His Elephant by Malcolm MacPherson a wonderful story

#56 SafariChick

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 10:51 PM

a few more titles...
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver a good reread
Three Weeks in December by Audrey Schulman
Colour Bar by Susan Collins mentioned previously, about Seretse Khama
The Fear by Peter Godwin Zimbabwe 2008
The Cowboy and His Elephant by Malcolm MacPherson a wonderful story

Someone I know who hasn't been to Africa but knows of my interest in it lent me The Poisonwood Bible - I haven't started it but she said it's very good - glad to hear another recommendation of it, I'll give it a try!



#57 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 09:14 AM

Mitch Rearon SHAPING KRUGER published late 2012

This book has a number of chapters written in journalistic style about animal behaviour,ecology and Kruger mamagement issues accompanied by photographs. it is not a wildlife pictorial ,although it comes from a well known photographer, the pages are only 170 X230 mm are on matt paper, the phots are incidental to showing the story.

each of the big 5 have a chapter, there is a combined chapter on zebras and wildebeest, chapters on roan antelope, giraffes,cheetahs,wikd dogs and hyneas.

there is good detail about the TB problem with the buffaloes

total 208 pages

an interesting book well recommended

Wild Africa is in my blood. All life is sacred and interconnected. for the animals are fellow nations caught in the splendor and trevail of the earth.


#58 Treepol

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 05:37 AM

I went to Melbourne for a Bruce Springsteen concert yesterday and as usual I visited Andrew Isles Natural History Books (Prahran) and came away with these:

 

Leakey, Richard - Wildlife wars

Packer, Craig - Into Africa

O'Connell, Caitlin - The Elephants secret sense : the hidden life of the wild herds of Africa

Walker, John - Ivory's ghosts : the white gold of history and the fate of elephants

Weber, Bill and Vedder, Amy - In the kingdom of gorillas : fragile species in a dangerous land

 

 

I've read the first two, but I do like to own a copy of memorable titles and I look forward to spending time with the others.


Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

Groucho Marx

#59 SafariChick

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 01:29 AM

@Treepol and also, how was Bruuuuuuuuce?



#60 Treepol

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 05:32 AM

Bruce was amazing - he sang for 3 hours and interacted with (and crowd-surfed) the audience. There were 18 people on stage throughout the concert - surely a night to remember!


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Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

Groucho Marx





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