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What Africa books have you bought recently?


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#21 wilddog

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 08:30 PM

Sarah Palin....OMG, I'd have to be really desperate to read anything of hers wouldn't I? I doubt she even knows where Africa is!



:lol: :lol: :lol:

#22 tonypark

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 12:00 AM

Well yes GW I bought and read all of those during the past year...I had read some of them previously but decided that I wanted copies to read and reread.

I must admit to be somewhat addicted to reading....and I do read books unrelated to Africa as well.

Tony Park, hmmm I think he's some Aussie fellow whose book I picked up cheap somewhere, liked it, and bought several of his others. Just something to fill in the time really....and besides the poor fellow needs the money to support his lifestyle...but I do wish he'd hurry up and finish another book! My father, who used to be a big Wilbur Smith fan, has now switched to Tony's books, since I sent him one for his birthday.

Sarah Palin....OMG, I'd have to be really desperate to read anything of hers wouldn't I? I doubt she even knows where Africa is!


I would post a comment here if I wasn't so busy writing. So I won't. (thanks for the support gangurru, and hope your dad likes them too!)

#23 gangurru

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 03:28 AM

Not only my dad, Tony, but I've got my brother....another big reader....reading your books too. And they are both enjoying them. It's like a one-family Tony Park fan club!
Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.....Groucho Marx

#24 madaboutcheetah

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 07:00 AM

I bought "barefoot through the serengeti" at the Nairobi airport last week. Shall get to reading it after photo editing ........

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Botswana in my blood .......


#25 twaffle

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 07:47 AM

I bought "barefoot through the serengeti" at the Nairobi airport last week. Shall get to reading it after photo editing ........



I enjoyed it!

My copy of Daphne Sheldrick's new autobiography arrived today so I guess that's my newest book now.

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#26 Game Warden

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:12 AM

if I wasn't so busy writing.


Hope not too busy Tony, still waiting for you to sort out Kevin's interview ;)

"Return to old watering holes for more than water; friends and dreams are there to meet you." - African proverb.

 

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#27 samburumags

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 12:54 PM

My latest short read is by the author of War Horse and is actually a children's story The Butterfly Lion, it can be read in a night and is a truly magical story for adults and children alike.
But, in the gathering darkness, deep behind my soul, someone, something whispers "Africa"" (Mark Owens "Secrets of the Savannah")

#28 armchair bushman

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 06:10 AM

now reading "The Gunny Sack" by M.G. Vassanji. It's not as good as his previous book, "The In-Between World of Vikram Lall", which was so excellent that my dad just about broke down reading it because of how close to home it was with its descriptions of growing up in pre-independence nairobi and nakuru.
I tried reading "The Obscure Logic of The Heart" by Priya Basil, but got very bored very quickly.
Also working my way through "Settling in a Strange Land" compiled by Cynthia Salvadori
Within the last couple of years I've read: "Wizard of the Crow" by Ngugi Wa Thiongo - A MOST EXCELLENT book
It's Our turn to Eat by Michaela Wrong - excellent and depressing
"In The Footsteps of Mr. Kurtz" by Michaela Wrong - also excellent!
"The Dust of Africa" by Shel Arensen - alright, a bit beneath my level
"Tick Bite Fever" and "British as a Second Language" by David Bennun - both are hilarious, but the first is far better.

Recent guide books: "Butterflies of South Africa" - Steve Woodhall
"Birds of Prey of Africa and its islands" - Meg and Allen Kemp
"Trees and Shrubs of East Africa" - Najma Dharani (New edition, which is much better than old edition, but still very basic)

#29 Treepol

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 09:02 AM

A recent read was Lettah's gift by Graham Lang.

It is a memorable novel of a man who returns to Zim from Australia to locate a former servant and pass on a legacy from his mother.

Returning to Zim he is struck by the many changes in the places of his childhood and the few remaining friends of his and his parents. The book is keenly observed and communicates a disturbing sense of a society in freefall where all Zimbabweans survive as best they can. Lettah's gift is published in Australia and I'm not sure how readily available it is overseas.

It reminded me very much of the latest Peter Godwin book, The Fear.


Regards,



Pol
Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

Groucho Marx

#30 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 09:54 AM

just arrived Lotte Hughes MOVING THE MASSAI A COLONIAL MISADVENTURE pelgrave looks interesting about their forced removal from laikipia to narok buy british imperal govt in 1904

just ordered Daphne sheldrick's memior

comming in sept alan roots meemoir IVORY,APES AND PEACOCKS interestingly he lives at Lewa conservancy

Wild Africa is in my blood. All life is sacred and interconnected. for the animals are fellow nations caught in the splendor and trevail of the earth.


#31 Pernille

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 05:21 PM

I have just picked up a (almost new) copy of "Photographing on Safari" by Joe McDonald it looks very interesting.

Pernille

#32 africapurohit

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 11:53 AM

Just finished reading George Adamson's autobiography "My Pride and Joy" which is a very good and interesting read. Even better is Tony Fitzjohn's "Born Wild" which I'm half way through.

Both books go hand in hand and there is a lot of overlap, but from different perspectives.

#33 Uh_oh busted

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 01:51 AM

The Fear - Peter Godwin
Because we're headed to Zimbabwe and we've read all his other books. I alo started reading Doris Lessing's "African Laughter" but it seems a bit dated.

#34 Treepol

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 03:15 AM

The Last rhinos by Lawrence Anthony.

The third book by this passionate conservationist who died earlier this year. I also own his 2 previous works, Babylon's ark (the story of the rescue of the remaining animals at Baghdad Zoo in 2003) and the Elephant whisperer.

I've just finished Dust devils by Roger Smith which is a thriller set in South Africa. Fans of Deon Meyer might enjoy this whilst waiting for 7 days.


Regards,


Pol
  • Dot and dawhitworth like this
Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

Groucho Marx

#35 Whyone?

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 10:02 AM

I recently re-read 'The Guides Guide to Guiding' by well known Zimbabwean guide Garth Thompson.  He has a nice writing style, there is a lot of factual content, but he scatters interesting stories throughout the book and provides some interesting insights regarding the guides view of their clients.

 

Well worth a read...but then I would say that having read it twice!



#36 alezsu

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:06 PM

Wild Deer, by Ethelreda Lewis -- a book which I picked up in a secondhand stall somewhere outside of Cape Coast, Ghana about 6 years ago and haven't yet finished. It's a great book - very emotional/evocative, though, so I tend to read it in chapter spurts and then put it down to process for months at a time! It's a bit of a tough cookie to track down (I've tried to find copies for friends), but it's really very good, and as a black American myself, it's always interesting to me to read novels/books that talk of the diasporic (i.e. black-but-not-African) experience in Africa.

From the book jacket: "After she had become world-famous as the co-author of the bestseller Trader Horn, Ethelreda Lewis sought to create an independent name for herself as a novelist. Wild Deer was published in 1933 under the pseudonym of R. Hernekin Baptist and has been amongst the lost novels of South African literature. Yet its author exerted great influence upon one of the larges populist movements South AFrica has ever seen, the Industrial and Commercial Workers' Union (ICU), and upon its mercurial first secretary Clements Kadalie.

Wild Deer tells the story of a black American singer, de la Harpe - at the height of his fame but at a spiritual low point - who visits South AFrica and gradually discovers his soul...The main characters are composite portraits of Kadalie; the American singer [and filmmaker] Paul Robeson; the journalist Selope Thema; Tshekedi Khama, chief of the Bamangwato; the author Winifred Holtby; William Ballinger the trade unionist; and J.C. Smuts."


Besides that, just browsing through Withers & Hosking's Wildlife of East Africa (pretty pictures, but short on information), and am on-and-off reading Joy Adamson's The Peoples of Kenya.

And I have just ordered Estes' The Safari Companion and First Field Guide to Animal Tracks of Southern Africa by Louis Liebenberg.



Oh! And since I have a weak spot for pulp chick lit, I've been reading Stiletto Safari, which is set in Namibia and is quite cute. :)

2013: Kenya (5 mo)

2014: Kenya (2 mo)

2015: Namibia (2 mo)

2017: S. Africa (3 mo)

2018: Kenya (4 mo)


#37 Riaanf31

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 09:25 AM

My favourite Safari linked reads are: The Elephant Whisperer and Jock of the Bushveld. I have them both in print and on my Kindle. Even if not a reading book my Roberts birding book as given me countless hours of enjoyment. 



#38 Bwana Foster

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:31 PM

I am going on my first safari in June so I am busy finding every book I can, either new or 2nd hand. I just purchased:
Eye of the Elephant by Delia and Mark Owens, Cape to Cairo by Kingsly Holgate, Whatever You Do, Don't Run by Peter Allison and The Safari Companion by Richard Estes.

Hi , I hope you have a great safari, enjoy.

 

A couple of great books to take with you are Beryl Markham's "West with the night" about an astounding woman who grew up with the Maasai and Kikuyu in Kenya and went on to great achievements in the world of safari guiding, flying and race horse training-I read it in one go-I could not put it down!

 

The other one is "Lost lion of Empire-its about Ewart Grogan a man who was instrumental in founding the town of Nairobi when it was just a frog marsh! He went on to do some fantastic things as an entrepenuer even building a porrt at Mombassa and a railway across Kenya to transport his timber to the port. Facinating almost all the way through (apart from a boring bit where he got into politics) This guy walked from Cape town to Cairo before there was any detailed maps to win the hand of his sweetheart! Astounding!



#39 Bwana Foster

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:45 PM

Oh I also recently read a copy of "Follow my footsteps through the Kruger" by Lou Van De Merwe a light hearted look at the life of a safari guide and water pump maintenance engineer who worked for years in the Kruger park. Originally written in Africaans I have an English translation that Lou gave me after meeting me in Phalaborwa-what a nice gentleman-it would be great to spend a couple of nights in the bush with him-years of wisdom there. Some of his stories are very funny and amusing but all have great interest to anybody with a love of the bush. Lou is now advancing in age and can't climb a water tower to escape a hungry lion as fast as he used to........



#40 Game Warden

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:01 PM

Bwana, sounds like Lou would be a perfect candidate for a future Safaritalk interview :)


  • Riaanf31 likes this

"Return to old watering holes for more than water; friends and dreams are there to meet you." - African proverb.

 

How to create your gallery album and upload images.

 

How to post images in the text.

Want to tag another member in a post? Use @ before their display name, eg @game warden






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