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Namibia Here I Come!


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#1 seanb

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 09:04 PM

Hi Guys, A newbie here. Just in the planning stages of a trip to Namibia which will be the realization of a dream for me and the wife. Plus I'll be putting my brand new Nikon D7000 through its paces at Etosha Pan. I've also bought a new 70 - 200mm lens which I'm hoping will get me in close to the animals.
I've attached a few shots up here by Christopher Rimmer. I saw an article on him in a South African newspaper and looked him up on the web. He has done quite a bit of shooting in Etosha Pan and his work is just stunning. What worries me through is he seems to be getting awfully close up to the animals as there is an incredible amount of detail in each shot. I'm starting to wonder if the old 200mm is going to cut it. I realize I'm not going to get work of this quality but I'd really like to fill the frame with the animal instead of it being a blob on the horizon. Any thoughts from you guys who have been to Etosha?

(Edited, Matt. Please refer to this important topic about copyright. Thanks.)

#2 Game Warden

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 09:21 PM

Welcome SeanB: I've had to edit your post, due to uploading the work of another photographer. Matt

"Return to old watering holes for more than water; friends and dreams are there to meet you." - African proverb.

 

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#3 seanb

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 09:29 PM

Welcome SeanB: I've had to edit your post, due to uploading the work of another photographer. Matt

Sorry Matt, the shots I posted were online so I assumed the rule of fair use in the public domain would apply. Christopher Rimmer has a public site on Facebook at My link and a website at My link with many examples of his work.

#4 Atravelynn

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 02:57 AM

I think you'll want 300 or better. Not been to Etosha, but from experience in other parts of Africa. Whatever lens you take, have a great trip!
When you think of a rhino, think of a tree (African proverb)

#5 Gary T

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 08:29 AM

I was in Etosha in November.

The herbivores (especially zebra, black faced impala and springbok) are the most relaxed I've yet to come across in Afica - even more so than Ngorongoro Crater. You can literally stop the vehicle next to them and they won't run - even the steenbok seem reluctant to move.

However, at the waterholes there are only certain spots you can park at and, dependent on what waterhole it is, you can be quite a distance from the waters edge. Therefore a 300mm+ is a must. I mainly used a 300mm 2.8 with a 1.4 converter for single animal shots and often this wasn't enough. Incidentally, Etosha Pan itself is usually some way from the road network - you'll be needing a 600mm+ to frame fill any animals out on the pan - but this is unneccesary as they will all be heading to the waterholes anyway.

#6 seanb

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 07:47 AM

Thanks for these replies, it sounds like I need to invest in a x2 converter in that case. I have to say though, it makes the results that Christopher Rimmer got all the more mystifying as I read that he only uses short lenses yet the frames are full and the detail really remarkable. Also, I've heard that Etosha is very dusty Gary, how did that effect your changes lenses? Did you find the camera getting full of muck?

#7 dikdik

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 08:26 AM

Yes Etosha is very dusty. I remember making the mistake of opening the top of my Jeep, so that my wife could have a better vantage point, and regretting it at the car filled up with powder.

So envious of you. It is lovely there and they have dikdik too. What else are you planning on seeing while in Namibia?

trip report here.

There's none so blind as those who will not see.


#8 seanb

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 10:16 AM

I'm hoping to spend some time trying to get some wildlife shots in Etosha as long as my wifee's patience holds out and then we drive north up to Owupo to visit a Himba village. We have 17 days to drive around and take in the country. I've wanted to see Namibia for many years so I'm really looking forward to getting over there.

#9 Gary T

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 07:42 AM

Sean,

It's certainly dusty when vehicles pass by but at watering holes I didn't find it too bad, not enough to stop me changing lenses. Just be ready to quickly shut the windows when something comes the other way.

The distance to the animals at the watering holes is dictated to by whcih water hole it is and how close the parking section is. some of them are very close. then obviously you need the animals to come to your side. :)

Cheers,
Gary.





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