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Good trees reference book not a spotting book but


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#1 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 07:56 AM

Hi All

I wonder if anyone can recommend a good reference book on trees

I am looking for something that has more information than a tree spotting book but is not a gardening book or written for qualified scientists , which I am not.

the lowveld guide is especially usefull ,I have a copy of the 2006 edition with info on each tree compressed to 2 pages but still at a good readable size so would be possible to travel with the book.

int
the Sappi tree spotting guides are very interesting and the trees section of GAME RANGER IN YOUR BACKPACK is great .

I like the format and the information it gives eg umberella thorn tree grows in clay soil, uses chemical defence against herbivours and other trees growing nearby.

thanks for your advice in advance

Wild Africa is in my blood. All life is sacred and interconnected. for the animals are fellow nations caught in the splendor and trevail of the earth.


#2 Jan

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 11:12 AM

COSMIC RHINO, I use a book by Veronica Roodt called The Shell Field Guide to Common Trees of the Okavango Delta for

my safaris in Botswana. I bought this small, 110 page paperback about twenty years ago, and I find it informative,

with illustrations on every page. It may no longer be in print, but if you are going to Botswana you may be able to

track it down. It gives me all the information I need.

#3 Safaridude

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 02:48 PM

Agree Jan. I really like all of Veronica Roodt's books in fact. They are enormously helpful, informative and entertaining. Her books are readily available.

#4 Jan

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 09:28 PM

Agree Jan. I really like all of Veronica Roodt's books in fact. They are enormously helpful, informative and entertaining. Her books are readily available.


Good to hear that, Safaridude.

#5 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 03:07 AM

Thanks all, but I was wondering if someone knew of as I asked a book deeper than a field guide but not a technical botanical reference which I could not understand

ranger in back pack is very good for that and I was wondering if anyone knew of a book as descrided

Wild Africa is in my blood. All life is sacred and interconnected. for the animals are fellow nations caught in the splendor and trevail of the earth.


#6 Tom Kellie

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 07:09 AM

the Sappi tree spotting guides are very interesting and the trees section of GAME RANGER IN YOUR BACKPACK is great .

I like the format and the information it gives eg umberella thorn tree grows in clay soil, uses chemical defence against herbivours and other trees growing nearby.

 

~ @COSMIC RHINO

 

I too have been impressed with the detail given about botanical defenses in ‘Game Ranger in Your Backpack’.

 

The text carefully brings out ecological realities which deepen understanding of observed relationships and events.

 

It's solely because of your mentions of the book that I purchased it in O.R. Tambo Airport.

 

Thank you for emphasizing its fine qualities.

 

Tom K.



#7 armchair bushman

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 08:11 AM

"Field Guide To Trees of Southern Africa" by Braam Van Wyk and Piet Van Wyk is more in depth than game ranger in your packpack, sappi tree-spotting, etc. but not to full of botanical jargon.  And where botanical jargon is present, there are good explanations.  It also comes with a very helpful key at the front which helps you find the species (or at least the family/genus) that you're looking for based on physical characteristics.

 

If you want the mother of all tree books (the botanical equivalent to Robert's Birds, or Smither's Mammals), go for "Trees of Southern Africa" by Keith Coates-Palgrave, which has this description on Amazon: "Aimed at layman and botanist alike, this handbook presents all the trees in southern Africa in one volume."

 

For Kenya/East Africa, you can try "Trees of Kenya" by Tim Noad and Anne Birnie - http://www.amazon.co...e/dp/9966848959
I have "Field Guide To Trees and Shrubs of East Africa" by Najma Dharani, but I'm not a big fan of it, so I won't really recommend it.

 

If you can find "Wildflowers of East Africa by" Michael Blundell, you'll be in for a treat!  It's been out of print for many years and the author has since passed away, so little chance for a new edition.  Some of the names are a little out of date, but the photos are great, and it's an excellent guide for flowers - there really are no other good flower guides here.  You could try "Wayside Flowers" by Theresa Sapieha, but you may find it too basic and too limited in scope.

FYI, the Keith Coates-Palgrave book is still useful in other parts of Sub-Saharan Africa.  It's NOT a book you can walk around with in the field, though.  It's HUGE.


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#8 Tom Kellie

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 08:26 AM

"Field Guide To Trees of Southern Africa" by Braam Van Wyk and Piet Van Wyk is more in depth than game ranger in your packpack, sappi tree-spotting, etc. but not to full of botanical jargon.  And where botanical jargon is present, there are good explanations.  It also comes with a very helpful key at the front which helps you find the species (or at least the family/genus) that you're looking for based on physical characteristics.

 

FYI, the Keith Coates-Palgrave book is still useful in other parts of Sub-Saharan Africa.  It's NOT a book you can walk around with in the field, though.  It's HUGE.

 

~ @armchair bushman

 

Thank you so much for taking time to carefully describe these valuable African tree resource books.

 

It's especially valuable to know about the books, with your assessment of their utility.

 

I'm not exclusively looking for depth, but rather for cogency and clarity of explanation.

 

Instructing classes of graduate students and undergraduates who've never left Asia and who seldom leave their laboratories to walk in the field is challenging.

 

@COSMIC RHINO's recommendation of ‘Game Ranger in Your Backpack’ is highly appreciated because many of the explanatory notes are ideal for in-class use.

 

Capturing and holding student attention is an art. A wide range of resources is necessary, varying with the level of understanding and direct field experience of the students.

 

What you've so generously explained is of the highest worth, yet ‘Game Ranger in Your Backpack’ is engaging in its own right.

 

After safari #1 I ceased bringing any field guides with me on safari, thereby saving weight. 

 

For me, there's considerable time for leisurely perusing field guides and larger works at home, while systematically going through photographs.

 

I take extensive field notes during and after each game drive, which supplement the photographs and my unreliable memory.

 

You consistently set the finest example of sharing useful information for Safaritalk members and visitors.

 

I've mentioned you in class as an example of someone who's making the world a better place for wildlife without spending their career seated at a laboratory bench.

 

With Respect and Appreciation,

 

Tom K.


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#9 armchair bushman

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 02:12 PM

 

You consistently set the finest example of sharing useful information for Safaritalk members and visitors.

 

I've mentioned you in class as an example of someone who's making the world a better place for wildlife without spending their career seated at a laboratory bench.

 

You, sir, are too kind.
I'm glad to be of assistance.
Hope you're enjoying South Africa!


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#10 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 07:13 AM

@Tom K  good to see that you like GAME RANGER IN YOUR BACKPACK  it has a lot of information broken down into easy to understand segments  and you are impressed with the approach as a teacher


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Wild Africa is in my blood. All life is sacred and interconnected. for the animals are fellow nations caught in the splendor and trevail of the earth.


#11 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 07:28 AM

for gathering information there is a role for enthusiastic dedicated observers and formally trained scientists

 

as an example the renown Dutch photographer Hugo van Lawrick   who lived in the Serengeti for decades was the first one to suggest that hyneas  could be predators .

 

he was out all the time seeing things in the 1960's he observed a pack of hyneas on a zebra kill , when they moved of , he got out of his car and checked it over, it was too fresh to be scavanged


Wild Africa is in my blood. All life is sacred and interconnected. for the animals are fellow nations caught in the splendor and trevail of the earth.


#12 Tom Kellie

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 08:42 PM

@Tom K  good to see that you like GAME RANGER IN YOUR BACKPACK  it has a lot of information broken down into easy to understand segments  and you are impressed with the approach as a teacher

 

~ @COSMIC RHINO

 

I finished reading it a few days ago.

 

Excellent overview!

 

As I'm a notoriously slow learner, it reinforced much of what I'd been told or read before.

 

I'm in your debt for the recommendation.

 

Tom K.



#13 armchair bushman

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 01:20 PM

I have just bought myself "Upland Kenya Wildflowers and Ferns" (3rd and most recent Edition) by A.D.Q. Agnew.  I'm excited about it as I've wanted it for a long time.  It comes with a key at the beginning of the book as well as lesser keys at the beginning of each family.

Unfortunately, the colour on the cover image is a little deceptive, as all the illustrated plates are black and white only.

It also covers most grasses, sedges, and reeds, which are otherwise very UNDER-REPRESENTED in all other botanical guides for the region.

 

http://www.natureken...owers-and-ferns


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#14 Tom Kellie

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 05:49 PM

I have just bought myself "Upland Kenya Wildflowers and Ferns" (3rd and most recent Edition) by A.D.Q. Agnew.  I'm excited about it as I've wanted it for a long time.  It comes with a key at the beginning of the book as well as lesser keys at the beginning of each family.

Unfortunately, the colour on the cover image is a little deceptive, as all the illustrated plates are black and white only.

It also covers most grasses, sedges, and reeds, which are otherwise very UNDER-REPRESENTED in all other botanical guides for the region.

 

http://www.natureken...owers-and-ferns

 

~ @armchair bushman

 

Isn't that the truth? All too frequently works with attractive color covers exclusively feature black & white illustrations.

 

Your comment is the first time that I've noticed that mentioned, but it's so true.

 

It's nice of you to pint out that grasses, sedges and reeds are included, which are a steep challenge to identify.

 

Thank you so much for this helpful post!

 

Tom K.


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