Jump to content



Message to Guests.

Welcome to Safaritalk where we have been talking Safaris and wildlife conservation since 2006. As a guest you're welcome to read through certain areas of the forum, but to access all the facilities and to contribute your experience, ask questions and get involved, you'll need to be a member - so register here: it's quick, free and easy and I look forward to having you as a Safaritalker soon. Matt.

Photo

Dr. Rolf D. Baldus - Selous Game Reserve, Tanzania.


  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#21 Fundi

Fundi

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Local time: 07:36 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Category 1:Resident in Africa/Former resident
  • Category 2:Conservationist/Naturalist

Posted 29 July 2014 - 08:58 AM

All mining projects require an EIA, this is legislation. There will be another formal review process yet to be published, but should be soon.

 

Exploration for uranium and mining for uranium are two totally different things. Lets stick with the science. Chatting is great and discussing the real issues need to continue. Check out the ISL techniques, there is little waste material. This is being considered by Uranium 1. Mining should take place because it will fund the conservation, so badly needed in this area and this is the key.



#22 Dam2810

Dam2810

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 312 posts
  • Local time: 04:36 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 29 July 2014 - 09:51 AM

 

Mining should take place because it will fund the conservation, so badly needed in this area and this is the key.

 

Justifying mining in a national Game Reserve/NP because of conservation leaves me speechless...

 

exploration and mining are not the same but the goal of the latter is to conclude that mining would be achievable and profitable...


“Africa’s human and natural resources have been pillaged and plundered for generations by people from far off lands. From slavery to archaeological artifacts, minerals, fauna and flora, the continent and its people have for so long been victims of other continents’ selfish interests, and today it is continuing…our elephant ivory and rhino horn are going to countries where they are used for God knows what! Only to satisfy ridiculous outdated beliefs whilst we remain with carcasses, as proof we once owned these magnificent animals.” President Khama


#23 Fundi

Fundi

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Local time: 07:36 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Category 1:Resident in Africa/Former resident
  • Category 2:Conservationist/Naturalist

Posted 20 August 2014 - 06:30 AM

http://motherboard.v...ig-game-hunting

 

This is nice tobacco for the pipe!



#24 Researcher

Researcher

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Local time: 06:36 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Category 1:Researcher
  • Category 2:---

Posted 22 August 2014 - 12:08 PM

Dear Fundi,

I am a researcher studying Wildlife Management Areas in the Selous-Niassa Corridor. I am interested to learn more about mining activities in the area. I would like to meet you, would you please PM me or email me at jb.mail [at] gmx.de ?

Looking forward to meeting/talking to you

 

I am a Uranium  Exploration Geologist and I have worked in Tanzania.

 

I have found the this article slightly alarmist and short of technical facts. The biggest threat to the animals in the Selous, in my view is the unregulated Hunters and obvious poaching. These people shoot animals! Yes, they 'kill them' for trophies under the guise of establishing a commercial and sustainable industry, which better protects the wider reserve through revenue creation. This might seem trivial, but with the current  poaching levels and latest elephant populations observed, this cannot continue under the current form. It is a slaughter without controls.

 

Recent attempts of anti poaching in the areas around Uranium 1 (Mkuju Uranium Project) is proving very successful. I have heard reports that there has not been a single elephant carcass for 6  months. This is a very positive outcome.

 

Who is paying for this you might ask.

Is it the Hunters claiming back their animals to shoot later? No!

Is it the very capable Tanzanian Govt, through their equally capable MNRT? No!

Is it the local MP in Namtumbo? No!

 

Is it the company trying to establish development/jobs and poverty alleviation in Tanzania? Yes!

 

Being critical of mining/development projects that could underpin the whole SGR is one thing, allowing for industry to better fund it through experts may be the answer?

 

Uranium and its decay products have been exposed and eroded into the Mbarangandu and the Luwegu Rivers for eons. This is a fact. All the rivers light up on any radiometric survey. To suggest mining will pollute is, in my view misleading. Co-existing is the key, through better protecting this threatened region. Having a mining company in the region would shed a very bright and focussed light on their activities, along with all other activities, including deforestation and poaching. It is the mid/top people in Tanzanian society benefiting from this destruction of natural resources. Eliminating this through other means of employment/opportunities will empower.

 

Lets perhaps also talk about birth control in Africa and family planning/education issues as real threats to the wider natural world.

 

This is intended as constructive points of discussion and add some support for Mining/Development/infrastructure for the Mtwarra Development Corridor. 

 

Kind regards

 

 

 

 


Edited by Researcher, 22 August 2014 - 12:08 PM.


#25 ronhalv

ronhalv

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Local time: 06:36 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norway
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 10 September 2014 - 09:35 AM

Fundi: I am really impressed with the comparison of big game hunting and uranium mining. You even show the worst example from hunting here. They have been punished and outfitters have lost their leases. I hope they can never hunt africa or any other place again.

If you take the worst examples of uranium mining, you have total destruction. I think most people, even anti-hunters would choose hunting from uranium mines. Especially in places like this.

Sadly this is in Africa and you can surely get your mines even though everyscientist and report says you shouldn`t. I can se bribes changing hands a lot of places.

Hopefully somebody will have som sense in this, but I guess money rules:(



#26 egilio

egilio

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 716 posts
  • Local time: 06:36 AM
  • Category 1:Conservationist/Naturalist
  • Category 2:Ecologist

Posted 10 September 2014 - 04:43 PM

@ronhalv Most countries will take mining over a national park / reserve. Just look at Australia's Karijini National Park. There's an odd spur excluded from the park. It's and open pit iron mine and the railway to it.


My blog about my life and work in the Luangwa Valley in Zambia: http://egildroge.blogspot.com

#27 ronhalv

ronhalv

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Local time: 06:36 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norway
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 15 September 2014 - 06:52 AM

@egilio I know and that`s sad in it`s own way. Even though a lot of mines are bad, this one has radioactive waste as a product. Not good!



#28 PauloT

PauloT

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts
  • Local time: 07:36 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ruaha National Park Tanzania
  • Category 1:Travel Agent
  • Category 2:Safari Guide

Posted 22 October 2014 - 06:43 AM

@cannedlion 

 

'The only thing missing is there by implication - that corruption is at the heart of the decision to mine, just as it is in most (if not all) major projects in Africa. Unable to generate funds by innovation or industrial expertise, African governments are forced to milk huge projects (or nationalise) for the money needed for them to remain in power through patronage. It is this fundamental political necessity that beggars the continent, and will continue to do so until there is an (unlikely) paradigm change in the way African politics functions.'

 

Brilliant 







© 2006 - 2014 www.safaritalk.net - Talking Safaris and African Wildlife Conservation since 2006. Passionate about Africa.
Welcome guest to Safaritalk.
Please Register or Login to use the full facilities.