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Dr. Rolf D. Baldus - Selous Game Reserve, Tanzania.


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#21 Fundi

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 08:58 AM

All mining projects require an EIA, this is legislation. There will be another formal review process yet to be published, but should be soon.

 

Exploration for uranium and mining for uranium are two totally different things. Lets stick with the science. Chatting is great and discussing the real issues need to continue. Check out the ISL techniques, there is little waste material. This is being considered by Uranium 1. Mining should take place because it will fund the conservation, so badly needed in this area and this is the key.



#22 Dam2810

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 09:51 AM

 

Mining should take place because it will fund the conservation, so badly needed in this area and this is the key.

 

Justifying mining in a national Game Reserve/NP because of conservation leaves me speechless...

 

exploration and mining are not the same but the goal of the latter is to conclude that mining would be achievable and profitable...


“Africa’s human and natural resources have been pillaged and plundered for generations by people from far off lands. From slavery to archaeological artifacts, minerals, fauna and flora, the continent and its people have for so long been victims of other continents’ selfish interests, and today it is continuing…our elephant ivory and rhino horn are going to countries where they are used for God knows what! Only to satisfy ridiculous outdated beliefs whilst we remain with carcasses, as proof we once owned these magnificent animals.” President Khama


#23 Fundi

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 06:30 AM

http://motherboard.v...ig-game-hunting

 

This is nice tobacco for the pipe!



#24 Researcher

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 12:08 PM

Dear Fundi,

I am a researcher studying Wildlife Management Areas in the Selous-Niassa Corridor. I am interested to learn more about mining activities in the area. I would like to meet you, would you please PM me or email me at jb.mail [at] gmx.de ?

Looking forward to meeting/talking to you

 

I am a Uranium  Exploration Geologist and I have worked in Tanzania.

 

I have found the this article slightly alarmist and short of technical facts. The biggest threat to the animals in the Selous, in my view is the unregulated Hunters and obvious poaching. These people shoot animals! Yes, they 'kill them' for trophies under the guise of establishing a commercial and sustainable industry, which better protects the wider reserve through revenue creation. This might seem trivial, but with the current  poaching levels and latest elephant populations observed, this cannot continue under the current form. It is a slaughter without controls.

 

Recent attempts of anti poaching in the areas around Uranium 1 (Mkuju Uranium Project) is proving very successful. I have heard reports that there has not been a single elephant carcass for 6  months. This is a very positive outcome.

 

Who is paying for this you might ask.

Is it the Hunters claiming back their animals to shoot later? No!

Is it the very capable Tanzanian Govt, through their equally capable MNRT? No!

Is it the local MP in Namtumbo? No!

 

Is it the company trying to establish development/jobs and poverty alleviation in Tanzania? Yes!

 

Being critical of mining/development projects that could underpin the whole SGR is one thing, allowing for industry to better fund it through experts may be the answer?

 

Uranium and its decay products have been exposed and eroded into the Mbarangandu and the Luwegu Rivers for eons. This is a fact. All the rivers light up on any radiometric survey. To suggest mining will pollute is, in my view misleading. Co-existing is the key, through better protecting this threatened region. Having a mining company in the region would shed a very bright and focussed light on their activities, along with all other activities, including deforestation and poaching. It is the mid/top people in Tanzanian society benefiting from this destruction of natural resources. Eliminating this through other means of employment/opportunities will empower.

 

Lets perhaps also talk about birth control in Africa and family planning/education issues as real threats to the wider natural world.

 

This is intended as constructive points of discussion and add some support for Mining/Development/infrastructure for the Mtwarra Development Corridor. 

 

Kind regards

 

 

 

 


Edited by Researcher, 22 August 2014 - 12:08 PM.


#25 ronhalv

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 09:35 AM

Fundi: I am really impressed with the comparison of big game hunting and uranium mining. You even show the worst example from hunting here. They have been punished and outfitters have lost their leases. I hope they can never hunt africa or any other place again.

If you take the worst examples of uranium mining, you have total destruction. I think most people, even anti-hunters would choose hunting from uranium mines. Especially in places like this.

Sadly this is in Africa and you can surely get your mines even though everyscientist and report says you shouldn`t. I can se bribes changing hands a lot of places.

Hopefully somebody will have som sense in this, but I guess money rules:(



#26 egilio

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 04:43 PM

@ronhalv Most countries will take mining over a national park / reserve. Just look at Australia's Karijini National Park. There's an odd spur excluded from the park. It's and open pit iron mine and the railway to it.


My blog about my life and work in the Luangwa Valley in Zambia: http://egildroge.blogspot.com

#27 ronhalv

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 06:52 AM

@egilio I know and that`s sad in it`s own way. Even though a lot of mines are bad, this one has radioactive waste as a product. Not good!



#28 PauloT

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Posted 22 October 2014 - 06:43 AM

@cannedlion 

 

'The only thing missing is there by implication - that corruption is at the heart of the decision to mine, just as it is in most (if not all) major projects in Africa. Unable to generate funds by innovation or industrial expertise, African governments are forced to milk huge projects (or nationalise) for the money needed for them to remain in power through patronage. It is this fundamental political necessity that beggars the continent, and will continue to do so until there is an (unlikely) paradigm change in the way African politics functions.'

 

Brilliant 



#29 Fundi

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Posted 06 December 2014 - 06:22 AM

Shooting endangered animals already stressed through poaching is not conservation or ecologically sustainable. There should be a complete moratorium on shooting animals.....period!

 

Justifying it through a means of conservation and which suit ones income is wrong. Paying for the privilege of shooting an endangered and unarmed animal is shameful and outdated. The world has changed along with global mind sets, whether your a true conservationist, a hunter, a poacher or a visiting Chinese warship housing diplomats with diplomatic immunity.



#30 ronhalv

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 03:11 PM

Shooting endangered animals already stressed through poaching is not conservation or ecologically sustainable. There should be a complete moratorium on shooting animals.....period!

 

Justifying it through a means of conservation and which suit ones income is wrong. Paying for the privilege of shooting an endangered and unarmed animal is shameful and outdated. The world has changed along with global mind sets, whether your a true conservationist, a hunter, a poacher or a visiting Chinese warship housing diplomats with diplomatic immunity.

Managed hunting is probably the best way to conserve different population of animals, often they have much less poaching in those areas. Most countries do this in a good way, some better then others. Look at what the populations in South Africa and Namibia have climbed to after well managed hunting has been the norm. Even thought (in your mind ) most animals would love to have radioactive waste in their water instead, worst case scenario is to die slowly from cancer and other nasty stuff. Hope you see the sarcasm, to give you little clue;) Making a point. Would like it if you read the last issue of Safari Talk. Especially Conservation in Focus by Calvin Cottar. I don`t think you will change your mind, but please read anyways.



#31 Fundi

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 06:56 AM

'Managed Hunting is probably the best way to conserve different populations of animals'?

 

It is not working in East Africa...period!. Please read the latest census when its published for the Selous Game Reserve....for what its worth, its due to be published soon. The point I make here is there is NO management of different animal populations, its a free for all and corruption is the root cause. Less Govt mismanagement would be the way forward and better managed by the private sector, which is where most of USD is coming from anyway.

 

Radio-nuclides have been exposed and eroding into the Maswati, Mbarangandu and Lewegu Rivers for the last millions years? All animals drink this water. I think we can put this argument to bed.

 

Climate change if left unchecked will ultimately leave us all cooked, so won't matter anyway. I liken it to the frog in the pot story!



#32 Bugs

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 11:56 AM

Shooting endangered animals already stressed through poaching is not conservation or ecologically sustainable. There should be a complete moratorium on shooting animals.....period!

 

 

Thats a little broad based. The Dallas safari club auctioned a black rhino hunt in Namibia - That is most certainly sustainable and if you impose a moratorium on that hunt or future hunts - you deprive people from a living and also remove the incentive for people to protect the wildlife. 

 

Then perhaps you should explain what endangered means. Elephant are not endangered in Southern Africa - in fact there are too many. Why not get an income from surplus and thus allow communities to benefit from that income? Some people say lions are endangered, but the reason is habitat loss - take hunting away - you take habitat away - and you are not solving the problem - you are making it worse. 

 

Don't get me wrong I have no desire to run off and kill any of these species - I would dearly like to see them survive - but we need to understand that we need to see to the needs of the people who have to share habitat with wildlife at the same time - or wildlife becomes less desirable for them to have as neighbours, and we will loose both the habitat and wildlife. Tourism works well where wildlife is plentiful - but not all habitat is suitable for tourists - as there are areas will natural low wildlife densities that are equally as important to conservation.


There's none so blind as those who will not see.


#33 Fundi

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 12:59 PM

If you read the first line of my comments you will see East Africa mentioned as being the issue, not Namibia. Both RSA and Namibia have their own problems but nothing to the extent of East Africa. I also note, that there is a big meeting in Las Vegas in regards to the new hunting season and yes jobs and income would be affected. Its about future generations us and them don't you think.

 

Namibia and RSA are fairly well controlled and have more resources to that end! This is not the case in East Africa.

 

A moratorium on hunting in East Africa should be in place until a genuine census can be established. By this, I don't mean a Govt or their affiliates census. It must be an independent census, this shouldn't be too hard to implement.

 

I would have thought it would have been better to conserve DNA specimens for future artificial insemination to protect the bloodlines (Namibia Black Rhino auction)? Perhaps some expert can add something to this conversation regarding this?

 

Lets wait for the new census on animal populations in the Selous? BTW, I have directed most of my comments towards the SGR and the need to better manage and sustain the standard of living we (Globally) all enjoy today and wildlife, through sustainable development and conservation. There's nothing broad based about that in my opinion. I don't think I need to explain what endangered means....look it up in a dictionary and read more about what's happening in this part of the world.

 

Tourism works well where wildlife is plentiful-yes I agree totally. This is a huge amount of money lost when an elephant is shot dead and opposed to Shot by a Nikon. I say again a complete moratorium should be in place until we have actual figures.

 

What is the true cost of a trophy....I mean seriously!



#34 ronhalv

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 01:20 PM

Moratorium is a good idea. Kenya has had one since 1977, look at the flourishing wildlife in Kenya. They have lost about 70 % of their wildlife. No one can benefit from it, therefore it has been wiped out so many places.

If you want a moratorium on something, maybe we should try mining in the parks. Then you can look at something useful.

I get that corruption is a problem and that we should try to better both laws and implementation of how hunting is conducted. You should try to be better at what you do, but hunting is the best way to do conservation. In africa as same as the rest of the world. Esepcially the places tourist don`t want to go. Look at Botswana that banned hunting in all goverment parks. Their biggest problem is to many elephants and destruction of habitat. In Tanzania they have a problem with less and less elephants because of poaching. Africa is a big place and should be treated differently according to where you are.



#35 Fundi

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 03:34 PM

This must be what it feels like to be an elephant



#36 Fundi

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Posted 25 March 2015 - 08:47 AM

http://www.news24.co...e-game-20150325
 

End of the game
 
CHRISTIAAN BAKKES

IT was a time to rejoice. It seemed to be the only logical way forward. The path had been laid out for us. The truth shone as clear as an unmuddied lake. We were bright-eyed and idealistic. Inspired and energetic. A brave new world.

 
Edited. Matt - @Fundi, please refer to the rules for posting content and news stories from another site.

 

Thanks, Matt.

 

(Also, we discuss Chris's article here.)







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