Game Warden

Dr. Rolf D. Baldus - Selous Game Reserve, Tanzania.

36 posts in this topic

@@ronhalv Most countries will take mining over a national park / reserve. Just look at Australia's Karijini National Park. There's an odd spur excluded from the park. It's and open pit iron mine and the railway to it.

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@@egilio I know and that`s sad in it`s own way. Even though a lot of mines are bad, this one has radioactive waste as a product. Not good!

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@cannedlion

 

'The only thing missing is there by implication - that corruption is at the heart of the decision to mine, just as it is in most (if not all) major projects in Africa. Unable to generate funds by innovation or industrial expertise, African governments are forced to milk huge projects (or nationalise) for the money needed for them to remain in power through patronage. It is this fundamental political necessity that beggars the continent, and will continue to do so until there is an (unlikely) paradigm change in the way African politics functions.'

 

Brilliant

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Shooting endangered animals already stressed through poaching is not conservation or ecologically sustainable. There should be a complete moratorium on shooting animals.....period!

 

Justifying it through a means of conservation and which suit ones income is wrong. Paying for the privilege of shooting an endangered and unarmed animal is shameful and outdated. The world has changed along with global mind sets, whether your a true conservationist, a hunter, a poacher or a visiting Chinese warship housing diplomats with diplomatic immunity.

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Shooting endangered animals already stressed through poaching is not conservation or ecologically sustainable. There should be a complete moratorium on shooting animals.....period!

 

Justifying it through a means of conservation and which suit ones income is wrong. Paying for the privilege of shooting an endangered and unarmed animal is shameful and outdated. The world has changed along with global mind sets, whether your a true conservationist, a hunter, a poacher or a visiting Chinese warship housing diplomats with diplomatic immunity.

Managed hunting is probably the best way to conserve different population of animals, often they have much less poaching in those areas. Most countries do this in a good way, some better then others. Look at what the populations in South Africa and Namibia have climbed to after well managed hunting has been the norm. Even thought (in your mind ) most animals would love to have radioactive waste in their water instead, worst case scenario is to die slowly from cancer and other nasty stuff. Hope you see the sarcasm, to give you little clue;) Making a point. Would like it if you read the last issue of Safari Talk. Especially Conservation in Focus by Calvin Cottar. I don`t think you will change your mind, but please read anyways.

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'Managed Hunting is probably the best way to conserve different populations of animals'?

 

It is not working in East Africa...period!. Please read the latest census when its published for the Selous Game Reserve....for what its worth, its due to be published soon. The point I make here is there is NO management of different animal populations, its a free for all and corruption is the root cause. Less Govt mismanagement would be the way forward and better managed by the private sector, which is where most of USD is coming from anyway.

 

Radio-nuclides have been exposed and eroding into the Maswati, Mbarangandu and Lewegu Rivers for the last millions years? All animals drink this water. I think we can put this argument to bed.

 

Climate change if left unchecked will ultimately leave us all cooked, so won't matter anyway. I liken it to the frog in the pot story!

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Shooting endangered animals already stressed through poaching is not conservation or ecologically sustainable. There should be a complete moratorium on shooting animals.....period!

 

 

Thats a little broad based. The Dallas safari club auctioned a black rhino hunt in Namibia - That is most certainly sustainable and if you impose a moratorium on that hunt or future hunts - you deprive people from a living and also remove the incentive for people to protect the wildlife.

 

Then perhaps you should explain what endangered means. Elephant are not endangered in Southern Africa - in fact there are too many. Why not get an income from surplus and thus allow communities to benefit from that income? Some people say lions are endangered, but the reason is habitat loss - take hunting away - you take habitat away - and you are not solving the problem - you are making it worse.

 

Don't get me wrong I have no desire to run off and kill any of these species - I would dearly like to see them survive - but we need to understand that we need to see to the needs of the people who have to share habitat with wildlife at the same time - or wildlife becomes less desirable for them to have as neighbours, and we will loose both the habitat and wildlife. Tourism works well where wildlife is plentiful - but not all habitat is suitable for tourists - as there are areas will natural low wildlife densities that are equally as important to conservation.

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If you read the first line of my comments you will see East Africa mentioned as being the issue, not Namibia. Both RSA and Namibia have their own problems but nothing to the extent of East Africa. I also note, that there is a big meeting in Las Vegas in regards to the new hunting season and yes jobs and income would be affected. Its about future generations us and them don't you think.

 

Namibia and RSA are fairly well controlled and have more resources to that end! This is not the case in East Africa.

 

A moratorium on hunting in East Africa should be in place until a genuine census can be established. By this, I don't mean a Govt or their affiliates census. It must be an independent census, this shouldn't be too hard to implement.

 

I would have thought it would have been better to conserve DNA specimens for future artificial insemination to protect the bloodlines (Namibia Black Rhino auction)? Perhaps some expert can add something to this conversation regarding this?

 

Lets wait for the new census on animal populations in the Selous? BTW, I have directed most of my comments towards the SGR and the need to better manage and sustain the standard of living we (Globally) all enjoy today and wildlife, through sustainable development and conservation. There's nothing broad based about that in my opinion. I don't think I need to explain what endangered means....look it up in a dictionary and read more about what's happening in this part of the world.

 

Tourism works well where wildlife is plentiful-yes I agree totally. This is a huge amount of money lost when an elephant is shot dead and opposed to Shot by a Nikon. I say again a complete moratorium should be in place until we have actual figures.

 

What is the true cost of a trophy....I mean seriously!

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Moratorium is a good idea. Kenya has had one since 1977, look at the flourishing wildlife in Kenya. They have lost about 70 % of their wildlife. No one can benefit from it, therefore it has been wiped out so many places.

If you want a moratorium on something, maybe we should try mining in the parks. Then you can look at something useful.

I get that corruption is a problem and that we should try to better both laws and implementation of how hunting is conducted. You should try to be better at what you do, but hunting is the best way to do conservation. In africa as same as the rest of the world. Esepcially the places tourist don`t want to go. Look at Botswana that banned hunting in all goverment parks. Their biggest problem is to many elephants and destruction of habitat. In Tanzania they have a problem with less and less elephants because of poaching. Africa is a big place and should be treated differently according to where you are.

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This must be what it feels like to be an elephant

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http://www.news24.com/Columnists/GuestColumn/End-of-the-game-20150325

End of the game

CHRISTIAAN BAKKES

IT was a time to rejoice. It seemed to be the only logical way forward. The path had been laid out for us. The truth shone as clear as an unmuddied lake. We were bright-eyed and idealistic. Inspired and energetic. A brave new world.


Edited. Matt - @@Fundi, please refer to the rules for posting content and news stories from another site.

 

Thanks, Matt.

 

(Also, we discuss Chris's article here.)

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