Jump to content




See all Safaritalk Special Offers

Message to Guests.

Welcome to Safaritalk where we have been talking Safaris and wildlife conservation since 2006. As a guest you're welcome to read through certain areas of the forum, but to access all the facilities and to contribute your experience, ask questions and get involved, you'll need to be a member - so register here: it's quick, free and easy and I look forward to having you as a Safaritalker soon. Matt.


Photo

A Letter from Dr. Richard Estes - Former Antelope Specialist Group Chairman


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Safaridude

Safaridude

    Order of the Pith

  • Members
  • 2,019 posts
  • Local time: 11:32 AM
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 01 March 2011 - 03:36 PM

Attached is a letter from Dr. Richard Estes - former Antelope Specialist Group Chairman and author of The Behavior Guuide to African Mammals and The Safari Companion: a Guide to Watching African Mammals. With full permission from Dr. Estes, I post the letter here.

Highlights:

I have read the Hirola Task Force’s proposal and find it very complete and well-reasoned in every respect. The plan for in-situ breeding of the hirola in a fenced sanctuary inside the Ishaqbini Community Conservatory is surely the best of all proposed alternatives for arresting the decline in this critically endangered species’ population.

In-situ breeding inside a secure sanctuary and restocking of the Ishaqbini Conservancy are essential first steps in saving the hirola from extinction. Long-term, the success of the hirola in-situ breeding program will depend on whether a substantial portion of its historic range can be repopulated and protected.


(I've edited in the letter below in it's complete form, as well as keeping here as an attachment. Matt)

Attached File  HirolaEstes.doc   358KB   100 downloads

Edited by Game Warden, 01 March 2011 - 07:01 PM.


#2 Game Warden

Game Warden

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • 16,407 posts
  • Local time: 04:32 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sat by the PC
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 01 March 2011 - 06:07 PM

Posted Image

5 Granite St.
Peterborough, NH 03458
18 February 2011


TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN



I have read the Hirola Task Force’s proposal and find it very complete and well-reasoned in every respect. The plan for in-situ breeding of the hirola in a fenced sanctuary inside the Ishaqbini Community Conservatory is surely the best of all proposed alternatives for arresting the decline in this critically endangered species’ population.

I find the section on the Founder Population/Background confusing. All the other Alcelaphini (and virtually all antelopes in the Antilopinae), have a territorial social organization. Unless the hirola is different, only territorial males with females on their property are entitled to herd “family groups”, i.e. herds of females and young. That said, nursery herds of topi and hartebeest can remain semi-permanently on specific territories where territories are large and the habitat combines bushed and open grassland. Such is the case with topi in the Serengeti woodland zone near Seronera (author’s unpublished observations; see also topi and hartebeest accounts in Estes 1991). It is also possible, where an antelope lives at such low density that no territorial network exists, males will accompany female herds over a wide area (see roan account in Estes 1991). Assuming that hirola social organization is normal, one would expect the proposed sanctuary to be divided up among mature males in a territorial mosaic. Prime males would occupy the best habitat, as defined by female home ranges; old males would occupy suboptimal territories on the periphery, as do hartebeest in Nairobi NP (see account).

It is also unclear whether hirola reproduction in its natural range is seasonal or perennial. It is noteworthy that topi in eastern Kenya north of the Tana River are perennial breeders, though strictly seasonal in most of their range, calving at the beginning of the rains (Duncan 1975, cited in Estes 1991). This may be an adaptation to the irregularity of rainfall in the Nyika and coastal savanna mosaic. The same applies to sable (Hippotragus niger roosevelti) of the region (see account in Estes 1991). Of course, hartebeest reproduction is naturally perennial, at least in East Africa (see account). The question of seasonality is relevant to “harvesting” of hirola bred in the sanctuary. If the pattern follows the hartebeest system, then offspring will stay in the maternal herd, even to the sub-adult stage in the case of males. If seasonal, there will be a peer group of yearling females that can be released into the conservancy together. Similarly, there should be bachelor herds of sub-adult and young-adult males.

In-situ breeding inside a secure sanctuary and restocking of the Ishaqbini Conservancy are essential first steps in saving the hirola from extinction. Long-term, the success of the hirola in-situ breeding program will depend on whether a substantial portion of its historic range can be repopulated and protected.

The Kenya population, estimated at 16,000 animals in the late 1970s, ranged an area of ca. 17,900 sq km. The natural range of the Somalia population, of unknown numbers and now considered extinct, was about 20,500 sq km (Butynski 2000). “Today”, as the proposal notes, “Beatragus . . . exists only in the Ijara and Garissa Districts of Kenya’s North Eastern Province, between the Tana River and the Kenya–Somalia border. . . an area no more than 1,500 sq km.” The authors of the proposal promise that, “Continued survey work to identify the extent, distribution and status of hirola outside of Ishaqbini will be on-going.” Saving some substantial part of the hirola’s Kenya range from human overpopulation and habitat degradation promises to be the greatest challenge.

Submitted by R. D. Estes, PhD

Antelope Specialist Group chairman
1997-2005.


-----------------

Butynski, T. 2000. Taxonomy and distribution of the hirola antelope. Antelope Specialist Group Gnusletter 19(2):11-17

Estes, R. D. 1991. The Behavior Guide to African Mammals. University of California Press, Los Angeles and London.

"Return to old watering holes for more than water; friends and dreams are there to meet you." - African proverb.

 

How to create your gallery album and upload images.

 

How to post images in the text.

Want to tag another member in a post? Use @ before their display name, eg @game warden


#3 twaffle

twaffle

    Order of the Pith

  • Moderators
  • 8,623 posts
  • Local time: 02:02 AM
  • Gender:Female
  • Category 1:Wildlife Photographer/Artist
  • Category 2:Resident in Africa/Former resident

Posted 02 March 2011 - 11:07 PM

Thank you Safaridude and Richard Estes … very very interesting. I'm going to print it out and stick it in my Mammals book (Estes) for when l'm in Ishaqbini.

… clarity in thought comes after challenge …


#4 Lion Aid

Lion Aid

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 569 posts
  • Local time: 04:32 PM
  • Category 1:NGO
  • Category 2:---

Posted 03 March 2011 - 10:32 AM

Dick Estes is both a personal friend and a respected scholar. Respect does not begin to describe his ceaseless efforts to conserve and inform about African antelopes. He needs to be celebrated by all, but that would probably embarass him.
www.lionaid.org

#5 Atravelynn

Atravelynn

    Order of the Pith

  • Members
  • 9,847 posts
  • Local time: 09:32 AM
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:USA
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 03 March 2011 - 07:08 PM

Thank you for posting, Safaridude. I will celebrate Dr. Estes today for all his conservation efforts whether it embarrases him or not. Long live the hirola. Enjoy Ishaqbini, Twaffle.
When you think of a rhino, think of a tree (African proverb)

#6 Paolo

Paolo

    Order of the Pith

  • Members
  • 3,880 posts
  • Local time: 05:32 PM
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 03 March 2011 - 08:06 PM

Twaffle,

When are you going to Ishaqbini?

I must have missed something.....

#7 twaffle

twaffle

    Order of the Pith

  • Moderators
  • 8,623 posts
  • Local time: 02:02 AM
  • Gender:Female
  • Category 1:Wildlife Photographer/Artist
  • Category 2:Resident in Africa/Former resident

Posted 04 March 2011 - 01:52 AM

Paolo, no panic. We are talking wish lists still!! You will undoubtedly get there before me. :mellow:

… clarity in thought comes after challenge …


#8 Paolo

Paolo

    Order of the Pith

  • Members
  • 3,880 posts
  • Local time: 05:32 PM
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 04 March 2011 - 09:55 AM

We should go there togethr, Twaffle....

#9 twaffle

twaffle

    Order of the Pith

  • Moderators
  • 8,623 posts
  • Local time: 02:02 AM
  • Gender:Female
  • Category 1:Wildlife Photographer/Artist
  • Category 2:Resident in Africa/Former resident

Posted 04 March 2011 - 11:16 AM

I think so … the hirola committee should check out future accommodations and test run the tented camps!! :mellow:

… clarity in thought comes after challenge …


#10 Game Warden

Game Warden

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • 16,407 posts
  • Local time: 04:32 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sat by the PC
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 04 March 2011 - 12:19 PM

Great I'm in :mellow: They did say on the NRT site there is the possibility of a private camp concession. Perhaps ST should put in a tender...

"Return to old watering holes for more than water; friends and dreams are there to meet you." - African proverb.

 

How to create your gallery album and upload images.

 

How to post images in the text.

Want to tag another member in a post? Use @ before their display name, eg @game warden


#11 Sverker

Sverker

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Local time: 04:32 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Leksand, Sweden
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 04 March 2011 - 02:34 PM

I´m in too.
Slower is better!





© 2006 - 2016 www.safaritalk.net - Talking Safaris and African Wildlife Conservation since 2006. Passionate about Africa.

Welcome guest to Safaritalk.
Please Register or Login to use the full facilities.