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Show us your Elephant Pictures


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360 replies to this topic

#41 Paolo

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 09:44 PM

I have seen a bigger specimen (both in body and tusks) in January 1986, one of the famous Marsabit elephants. It was the heir of the legendary Ahmed, whose tusks are - i think- still conserved in the National Museum of Nairobi.

Unfortunately, I have no pictures, and I do not even know what happened to that elephant since the time I saw it. I doubt he might have survived the poaching frenzy of the 1980s.

#42 africapurohit

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 10:02 PM

I read somewhere that Ahmed had a combined tusk weight of around 135kg. I think he may hold the record for the longest tusks but not the heaviest. The British Natural History museum has a pair of tusks weighing over 200kg from an elephant shot in the late Nineteenth Century.

#43 twaffle

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 04:59 AM

Ahmed is still in the museum. He is a remarkably small elephant which made is tusks look much larger to the person seeing him alive in the wild.

Here are some photos my sister and I took in January when we were at the museum.

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… clarity in thought comes after challenge …


#44 Bugs

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 05:12 AM

Wow, fantastic photos.

I must remember this thread, as we are off to Tembe; home to the biggest living tusker. I hope to bring a photo back to share.

There's none so blind as those who will not see.


#45 africapurohit

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 06:16 AM

Twaffle, thanks for the Ahmed photos and info, I'll have to visit the museum when I'm next in Nairobi.

Good luck dikdik, we need more photos for this thread.

Edited by africapurohit, 07 October 2011 - 06:18 AM.


#46 Bugs

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 06:41 AM

Your photos look far more spectacular than the photos on this link. What is interesting is that the largest tuskers have traditionally bee small bodied elephants.
See here for the Tembe tusker

There's none so blind as those who will not see.


#47 twaffle

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 07:23 AM

Dikdik, very hard to get any concept of the size of those tusks. The report says 2.5 m long, wish they had put a matchstick next to the elephant so we could get a sense of scale! :lol:

The link also says the largest tusker in Southern Africa, I wonder what is left in some East African countries which could compare, not very much I think, but would be very interested to know.

… clarity in thought comes after challenge …


#48 africapurohit

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 09:23 AM

Quite a few years ago when I was visiting the Mount Kenya area, I met a biologist who had an interest in tuskers. He said most East African tuskers were either poached or died of old age but there were stories of some remaining hidden deep in Selous and Ruaha. He said the Marsabit tusker population was famous for long tusks but not heavy tusks, as their tusks had a lower density compared with Southern African tuskers. He said Meru also had a good tusker population, once. Hopefully, the gene pool is still alive in areas regarded as elephant strongholds such as large parts of Botswana and the Hwange population, and we may see some again.

Edited by africapurohit, 07 October 2011 - 09:25 AM.


#49 Paolo

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 09:39 AM

When I saw that Marsabit elephant (Abdoul.) I had the impression that it was quite hugely body sized -but it might just have been an impression.

The best ivory I have seen recently has been the one on the Matusadona elephants (much better than Botswana or Hwange elephants). The best specimen I have seen in East Africa in the last few years have certainly been in Meru.

#50 africapurohit

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 12:36 PM

What a sad coincidence, news has just broken that Duke has died. Apparently, he had lost both his tusks by 2010, so actual weight and length measurements were never recorded. Hopefully, he's passed on his genes to a few younger males.

http://www.timeslive...t-elephant-dies

Edited by africapurohit, 07 October 2011 - 12:48 PM.


#51 Wild Dogger

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 02:54 PM

South Luangwa

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Safaris and Ketchup are similar, sometimes you shake the bottle of Ketchup and nothing comes out, you shake and shake and shake and all of a sudden everything pops out.
So donīt stop shaking the bottle, thereīs a lot inside.

#52 Game Warden

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 02:56 PM

Wild dogger, wonder if that was the same elephant as in Egilio's post #27 above?

"Return to old watering holes for more than water; friends and dreams are there to meet you." - African proverb.

 

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#53 Wild Dogger

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 05:51 PM

GW, I donīt think so, almost all ellies do that in SLNP.
Safaris and Ketchup are similar, sometimes you shake the bottle of Ketchup and nothing comes out, you shake and shake and shake and all of a sudden everything pops out.
So donīt stop shaking the bottle, thereīs a lot inside.

#54 Game Warden

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 05:54 PM

It was kind of a joke...

"Return to old watering holes for more than water; friends and dreams are there to meet you." - African proverb.

 

How to create your gallery album and upload images.

 

How to post images in the text.

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#55 Wild Dogger

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Posted 10 December 2011 - 04:15 PM

Elephant shrew, South Luangwa NP

Posted Image
Safaris and Ketchup are similar, sometimes you shake the bottle of Ketchup and nothing comes out, you shake and shake and shake and all of a sudden everything pops out.
So donīt stop shaking the bottle, thereīs a lot inside.

#56 Paul T

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 09:38 AM

South Luangwa NP Nov 2011

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Tell me what you can hear and then tell me what you see; everybody has a different way to view the world.

 

http://www.paultillerphotography.co.uk


#57 Sverker

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:21 AM

A lot of elephant pictures ... :)

Show it on a very large screen and you will be transported to Africa in no time for five minutes.



If you click "Tube" you come to YouTube.com and may show it full-screen.

Edited by Sverker, 19 February 2012 - 11:01 AM.

  • Game Warden and mmackwan like this
Slower is better!

#58 Rainbirder

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:35 AM

Congratulations on a beautiful and very aesthetic clip!!!
As you say, a porthole to Wild Africa in all its glory!
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#59 Game Warden

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:11 AM

I've merged this topic with another topic which was "Show us your Tusker photos". Matt.

"Return to old watering holes for more than water; friends and dreams are there to meet you." - African proverb.

 

How to create your gallery album and upload images.

 

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#60 savoche

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 12:58 PM

These images are unfortunately not of the greatest technical quality - I was a bit too excited to pay attention to the exposure ;)

This girl and her family came right up to our tent in Mana Pools...

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I felt somewhat small sitting in the tent opening looking up at her...

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...and she knew full well I was there!

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From the look of the trees this wasn't the first time the family came by to scratch an itch :)

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Some parts are just hard to reach with the trunk, you know...

Posted Image
  • Steve 27752 likes this





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