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Paolo

Show us your Lesser Kudu pictures

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Something a bit unusual....a beautiful lesser kudu bull, pictured in Meru, not far away from our camp (late August 2009); just one of the many sightings of these shy and elegant creatures we have been blessed to have in that park.

 

gallery_1_7_132114.jpg

 

Lynn: I hope you are going to have our same luck during your forthcoming trip!

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Very nice shot, great size horns and markings.

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I'll be looking for this handsome guy! Thank you!

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Beautiful shot.

 

I've never seen the lesser variety in the real world.

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Wow a lesser kudu - never seen one before. Also an extraordinary specimen - full 2 and a half turns. Great shot as well.

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Excellent, Paolo!!! Never seen one before. Btw, could you post a pic of one from a full side angle (if you have one)? Thanks.........just to fully comprehend the differences!

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Thanks to everyone.

 

 

Btw, could you post a pic of one from a full side angle (if you have one)? Thanks.........just to fully comprehend the differences!

 

I should have some full side angle shots (especially of females). Give me a little bit of time (most of my pictures are stored in CDs or photo albums in my PC at my family house).

 

As to the differences between Greater and Lesser Kudu, one of the most striking is the fact that Lesser Kudu lacks any "beard" on its throat (in fact, its Latin name is Tragelaphus imberbis; imberbis means "without beard"). As to the white stripes on the body, I think (it should be checked though) that Lesser Kudu has 11 to 14 of them, whilst Greater Kudu can have any number between 4 and 12. Also the colours are rather different (Greater Kudu are more brownish, whilst Lesser Kudu tend to be more blueish).

 

On normal circumstances, lesser kudus are extremely shy and fleety antelopes, and amazingly apt at camouflaging amongst the thick, thorny bush they normally live in.

 

Many trophy hunters reckon that Lesser Kudu and Lord Derby's (Giant) Eland are the most challenging and difficult hunts in Africa.

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Thanks....... No rush. Take your time!!!

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I ,too, have never seen a lesser kudu. What a lovely animal.

 

 

 

Jan

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Far from ideal as an identification aid, but if Paolo has no side-on males, I have one dodgy picture of what I believe to be a male lesser kudu from Tsavo West... which, along with Tsavo East (unless we were incredibly lucky) is a very, very good place to see them.

 

406945132_CJEFC-XL.jpg

 

 

Second picture of what Paolo thinks is a Greater Kudu removed......

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Yes, Tsavo/Mkomazi ecosystem is also good for Lesser Kudu.

 

Based on my experience, I would say that, Meru aside, Sarara in the Matthews Range with its waterhole, and the central/southern part of Tarangire (Minyonyo, Hondo Hondo, Lamarkau and down to the Nkungunero Pools) are the most reliable areas for good Lesser Kudu sightings.

 

As you mention, both Greater and Lesser Kudu occur in Ruaha - likewise in the Matthews and Tarangire. I would say that in Matthews Range and Tarangire Lesser Kudu far outnumber Greater. In Ruaha it might be just the opposite, but I am not sure.... (we would need Safaridude for a little bit of enlightment on this!).

 

Anyway, your picture would seem portraying a female Greater Kudu (I am saying this mainly based on the colour and the thickness of the neck)

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I can second Paolo - we saw them at Sarara last year, there was one which was wandering right into the camp up to the central lodge area looking for something to eat because of the drought. I had a look at my photos but the ones I have the focus isn't great. There were several others by the water hole most days. There was some hope that because the drought had mad the animals less shy of coming closer this would continue even after the rains.

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Anyway, your picture would seem portraying a female Greater Kudu (I am saying this mainly based on the colour and the thickness of the neck)

 

Thanks. Colour and neck thickness are things I just don't see. If it wasn't for the tufts and stripes I'd have no chance of telling the difference at all! Anyway,I removed that one for now! I'll put it back if I find any evidence it was lesser.

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...double post :)

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Lovely pic, Paul

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These impressive animals are "lesser" by no means. Thanks!

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Atravelynn

Today, 09:39 PM Post #17

 

These impressive animals are "lesser" by no means.

 

Meaning that they share a common trait with cinnamon bobka, as any Seinfeld fan will know (Hari will get this reference). "Lesser kudu, I think not!" :)

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Atravelynn

Today, 09:39 PM Post #17

 

These impressive animals are "lesser" by no means.

 

Meaning that they share a common trait with cinnamon bobka, as any Seinfeld fan will know (Hari will get this reference). "Lesser kudu, I think not!" :)

 

 

Yes, I remember the episode! The one where they shop for a bobka to take to the party? The B&W cookie that makes him sick?

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You lost me at bobka, so I'll just look at the kudu pics. But glad it's a good laugh for others.

 

I'm almost embarrassed to admit I am not a Seinfeld fan and don't know any of the jokes.

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Cinnamon bobka? Seinfeld?

 

I regret I am totally lost now....

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I regret taking this thread off-topic, but Lynn's comment amused me, and Hari got the reference. No more Seinfeld references from me unless in response to Hari!

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I will have to google for "Seinfeld"....

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paolo- that was the number 1 tv show in the 90s. Revolutionized tv during my early 20s

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I will have to google for "Seinfeld"....

I'm not as lost as Paolo.

 

Speaking of revolutionizing TV, I find the question, "What will replace television?" interesting. Because something will, maybe not for a long time. Probably some massive computerized panel or individualized TV-sunglasses.

 

I also like the comment: theater is art, cinema is entertainment, TV is furniture. Now with the flat big screens, TVs are more like appliances.

 

Here's a weird kudu fact, which may apply primarily to the Greater Kudu, but could be expanded to include the Lesser Kudu species.

 

There is a sport known as Kudu dung spitting (that's Bokdrol Spoeg in Afrikaans).

 

Kudu dung spitting is popular enough to have had an annual world championship competition, since 1994. Wonder who was the first guy (and I'm betting my rands it WAS a guy) to say to his buddies, "Let's put some of these kudu dung pellets in our mouths and see who can spit them the farthest?" I'm also betting Castle Lager played a large role.

 

There are even rules. The distance is measured from where the pellet landed, not where it rolled. Contestants can run up to the starting line, perhaps for more momentum, but cannot cross over the line.

 

Techniques vary. While a moister, fresher pellet might fly farther, contestants are reluctant to put fresh sh!t in their mouths so they will opt for older pellets and then soak them in liquid. Obtaining the correct level of moisture is a delicate operation because too moist and it just melts in your mouth. EWWW

 

The choice of liquid used is up to the contestant, but popular choices are Witblitz (cheap, high octane spirit) and Mampoer (One part peach brandy, two parts aviation fuel).

 

Apparently one very successful spitter has a unique technique in that he removes his false teeth first.

 

The closing ceremonies include a braai with lots more Castle Lager, Witblitz, Mampoer, maybe some Goats do Roam.

 

This is cultural tourism at its finest! While I don't plan on attending World Cup, I'd be very interested in The Kudu Dung Spitting World Championships as a spectator, or maybe I could even qualify as a contestant. What an honor that would be. I'd wear my cheesehead to represent my homeland.

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Do we need to think about forming a Safaritalk Cheer Squad in the event that Lynn qualifies as a contestant in The Kudu Dung Spitting World Championships?

 

 

Paolo and Paul - what beautiful shots.

You will quickly gather that I am no photographer but, after hesitating, I'm posting the enclosed shot of Lesser Kudu taken in Ruaha in 2000 because of their relative rarety.

 

 

 

gallery_6223_270_31851.jpg

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