Brian's Art for Animals

What wildlife is in your Woods / Backyard?

521 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

We have very tall sliding glass windows from our living room leading out to the back yard. Occasionally, a bird will fly into one of them. Often they recover after a period of time and luckily that happened with this little bird that flew into one of the windows this morning. Luckily we saw it happen. Our dog, Dusty, was outside when it happened and he saw it too. He ran over and sniffed at the poor thing that was lying on the deck with its wing at an odd angle breathing but otherwise not moving. Fortunately, we ran out and stopped him from doing more than sniffing. My daughter tried to gently pick it up with a towel I brought her but the towel was making it hard to do without fear of hurting the wing so she used her hand. She snapped this photo right before it flew away. Can anyone identify it? Is it some kind of dove? 

 

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Edited to add that my friend who lives near me says it is a dove but I'm not sure what kind.

Edited by SafariChick
to add that local friend identified bird as a dove
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@Safarichck - looks like a fledgling/immature Mourning Dove.

 

I hate to be the bearer of bad tidings but often birds that hit windows and seem to recover actually have cerebral edema and can succumb later to their injuries.

 

If you have windows that repeatedly have bird collisions, you might want to consider installing ultraviolet reflective window film.  It is invisible to the human eye, causes no issues cleaning the window, yet birds can see it and avoid the window like it is a brick wall.

 

These folks make a great product:

 

http://www.collidescape.org/home?gclid=CPSvoI6FyNQCFVOewAodpzkEQw

 

3M also makes a range of products:

 

http://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/home-window-solutions-us/

 

Amazon carries some products too:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Clear-Protection-Window-Film-Wide/dp/B004JAW3KW

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@offshorebirder aw, sorry to hear that it may seem to be ok but later succumb. But thank you for the links, that is so interesting to know such a product exists - I had no idea. I will check it out. 

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Posted (edited)

Doves are tougher than songbirds so I bet it is OK @SafariChick

 

 

Edited by offshorebirder
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So little time for photography in the past 6 months but I did get to spend one hour watching the very reclusive Australasian Bittern hunting in a salt marsh near my home.

 

Aust-Bittern_86I3926.jpg

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Nice sightings of Chamois and Marmot on a hike today:

 

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A bit far but a lovely moment:

 

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A coyote on our hike at Palo Corona this morning

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Not too concerned by our presence

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Remains of a skunk

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I also saw another bobcat! But I was too slow to get a photo. One of these days I hope to have some discernable proof of its existence :P

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At present it has been mainly these "hungry" guys who have been harvesting all of my walnuts and hazelnuts :angry:

 

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but these noctunal ones are also frequent visitors (all from the last week)

 

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On 8/25/2017 at 8:44 AM, Patty said:

Remains of a skunk

 

 

Eek!, What creatures would eat a skunk?

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@michael-ibk can i trade the sunny gleaming high rise towers of steel  in my country for your meadows of green and many splendoured flowers and beasts?

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20 hours ago, Geoff said:

Eek!, What creatures would eat a skunk?

 

I wondered that too. Apparently desperate ones. In my area coyotes, bobcats and mountain lions are the primary land predators. We think it was probably a great horned owl which are prevalent and don't have much of a sense of smell.

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This was a lovely young Black Racer I saw while doing habitat maintenance (yard work) this past Sunday.  It was prowling in an area favored by Carolina Anole lizards and Green Tree Frogs.   It was a bit under a meter I would estimate.

 

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Edited by offshorebirder
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Wow @Tdgraves - a Badger in the backyard!    How wonderful.

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A snapshot of a Short-beaked echidna I saw last week. The first echidna I've seen since February (late Summer). It's been a cold winter here and I suspect that the echidnas have been in a torpid state for the past few months. I noticed this one foraging on a roadside verge as I drove past.

Echidna_86I6986.thumb.jpg.5482e9b0e41f649550dd83fd290de180.jpg

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Bears in the back garden a few days ago. A mother with 2 cubs but I couldn't get all 3 in one photo.  The air was a bit smoky that day so not the best for photos.

 

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I made a quick stop at the Monterey Bay Aquarium yesterday morning and saw lunge feeding humpbacks from the back deck.

 

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Nothing too dangerous on the reptile front in our back garden.

36462202144_b80d0568ba_b.jpgSlow Worm by Dave Williams, on Flickr

Mind you wife Claire does a runner when she sees one!

A Slow Worm so it won't catch her!

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In a tree over the road a few yards up from my house when walking dog an hour ago. Don't often see mother with baby.

 

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@Caracal, what a gorgeous sight, are you rural or suburban? Common around your home? 

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I'm rural @elefromoz currently living just out of a small  town in South Gippsland. Our koalas are the Strezlecki Koalas which have been discovered to have a genetic diversity that may make them less susceptible to disease and climate change. Fairly common for me to see a male or hear one grunting loudly during the night but quite unusual to sight a female with youngster. She's been in trees in our road for over a week now - hope she stays awhile. Koalas visit gardens in our town and also trees in the median strip of our main street right outside the shops. We all worry about their hazardous crossing of the highways.

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We had a hawk bring a kill to our fence, which is a little unusual for us living in urban Houston. I am not a birder by any means, but thanks to Google I am going to go with Cooper's hawk or possibly a sharp-shinned hawk.

 

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A squirrel came by and didn't seem to be at all worried by the hawk.  In fact, it seemed to be trying to shoo the hawk away at one point.  After a brief standoff, the squirrel jumped into the trees and the hawk went about his dinner.

 

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This morning I was quietly photographing Fairy Martins collecting mud for their nests when this character slithered up to see what i was doing.

Unfortunately I had the wrong lens to capture better images. I watched it forage for about 15 minutes before it got too hot and it disappeared into a grass clump.

 

Australian Lowland Copperhead. It is highly venomous. They mainly eat small lizards, frogs & mice but bigger specimens will also eat other snakes.

Copperhead_86I0583.thumb.jpg.309c6e3a9d886f4333180f3e0070029e.jpg  

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I'm assuming not in your backyard @Geoff!   Were you beside a dam or riverbank somewhere?

 

An excellent front on shot.

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@Caracal  No, not in my backyard but I've seen them with a 100 metres of my place.

 

This one was in a fairly new man made wetland that was created as a storm water retarding pond near a new housing estate. The native grass vegetation has grown nicely and as I often see snakes in that area it was only a matter of time before they found their way there. Especially as there is plenty of food for them.

 

The Fairy Martins were collecting mud where water was flowing out of (a slight trickle at the moment) the storm water pipes. The snake appeared from behind them so he either came out of the drain or from a nearby rock wall that is above the concrete pipes.  The image shows the snake up on a grassy verge perhaps a foot above where the birds were collecting the mud.  

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I think it is a Sharp-shinned Hawk @cjt3 - but I'm not 100% certain.     

 

It is difficult to tell perched Sharp-shinned Hawks and Cooper's Hawks apart, but the size relative to the Squirrel and dove? plus the not-so-long tail make me think Sharpie.

 

 

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