Brian's Art for Animals

What wildlife is in your Woods / Backyard?

501 posts in this topic

Would that be the Hare that the airport (O! Hare!) is named for? I hope he's got TSA clearance! :P

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Lynn has presented us some "spot the difference" game. :lol:

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Lynn was just making sure that we read her excellent post. I like being on eye level with the rabbit, makes for a nice portrait. I hope we will get a Pantanal trip report with photos here as well.

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Nappa,

 

I've just noticed you've moved to the land of the wind and mists; though it's been quite benign don't be fooled :P

 

I sat in bed last night listening to the Lions roar as a Badger snuffled through the garden. Two years ago we had a Timber Wolf in the field behind our house and I'm told Wild Boar are on the increase. Of course only the Badger and now the Wild Boar are resident. The Lion are just down the road at the Zoo Park which is where the Wolf came from.

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Hebog take a look at the following clips all filmed in the Aldington / Bilsington area.

 

 

 

 

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Sadly I have to drive down the coast to from Walmer to enjoy the exotic wildlife of Kent.

 

Still, my 2 year old neice loves Howletts and Port Lyme - She is being trained early in life. She loves to look through my photos and screams every time she sees and elephant.

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Thanks for those Nappa. I'm still to see a Boar cross or not. There are confirmed sightings from a small Copse about 1/2 mile away (East of Aldington) so they've come up the rise from Bilsington. A farmer nearby has a herd of large black pigs which often escape and are spotted in the fields around here so I react to many sightings with a smiling nod but friends of mine who are farmers (with pigs) or were working at the Zoo when they had some Wild Boar (whatever happened to all of those :P?) have also seen them. Then there are all the videos and pictures - including that one at Coopers (Butchers) in Aldington.

 

I suppose if I acted as if I was on Safari I would see a lot more - the original point by Brian I guess?

 

Russell, I can understand your granddaughter screaming I get nervous around Elephant too ;)

 

Nappa; I forgot to say welcome to the Highlands!

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Hebog, I just love the idea that we could have stood in line at Coopers together!

& to be honest I've lived in the "Highlands" for 15 years or so! :P

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The hare at O'Hare. Good one Rick!

 

Rather than a spot the difference game, I lost control of my clicking or something. I have not decided to post in duplicate to try to be important.

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But it is a quick way to increase your number of posts! :P

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Nappa,

 

I wonder if you can recognise a fellow traveller? Do we all have a certain distant look or wear Khaki? I'll be interrogating everyone in the line.

 

Now I know what's in my woods - it's Nappa!

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The cottontails are cute. Probably one of the few things seen around OHare since they cleared out more land. I have only seen one skunk in my area, but saw two roadkill raccoons just today on my way to work. I always took the raccoons to be smart, but i guess not that smart to know what damage a moving vehicle can do to them.

I remember seeing a zorilla while on a night drive in Kenya. I was sitting up top the jeep and freaked out and everyone thought i saw a cat..but something about them skunks and skunk types that are a thrill.

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A lot less is in my woods now! The sanctuary near us was set up many years ago with (at that time) revolutionary anti feral animal fencing and a strong population of many small marsupials grew up there. Over the years the owner bought adjoining farms to make quite a large property and it all seemed to be going well. Now, several owners later, the current owners have hit hard times and have sold off the extra titles, 2 of which have maintained their fencing, so protecting their little marsupials but the one nearest us has cut a huge hole in the fence to gain access and to put in a drive way. So, of course all the feral cats and foxes, of which we have many, can head off into this supermarket and feed to their hearts content! It wouldn't have taken much to do as the other purchasers had done, and installed a proper gate so protecting these endangered little animals. They could have enjoyed the wonderful sight of these creatures for years to come. Bah humbug to them, and they are going to be our neighbours. Relations are already on thin ice, but they don't know it yet!!!!!

 

I am just a LITTLE disgusted by this lack of spirit in looking after our native heritage. ;)

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I understand that Australia and NZ have huge problems with feral animals, especially cats. I personally wont keep cats, as there is no way that you can guarantee that they don't kill every little critter. We have enough problems with the Jack Russel. Thankfully the squirrels are too smart and fast for it.

 

Do you need a license for a cat down under?

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Do you need a license for a cat down under?

 

 

Unfortunately, no. You can keep as many cats as you like, they can roam free day or night killing as they will. You don't have to have them desexed, so they can breed as much as they want. Don't get me wrong, I love cats and have had several in past years but they need to be looked after. I won't keep them now as my wild birds are too precious and I don't have a suitable outdoor cage system for them.

 

It is an insane lack of regulation as the cat lobby is too strong. We have regulations for all sorts of silly things, but not this really important matter.

 

You are only allowed 2 dogs in most suburban areas and they must be registered and kept under control. Good thing too, but the difference in the two pet regulations is vast.

 

You can't keep native animals or birds without a permit. You certainly wouldn't be allowed exotic animals (like they seem to have in the USA and other countries) without a permit. I know this because we thought about some black buck we were offered, but the restrictions are pretty onerous, as they should be.

 

We have two Jack Russell's but they are kept in the yard (large) and don't catch the rats or anything useful.

 

It's a mad world.

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TRIP REPORT - September 2, 2009

 

The day's journey begins at base camp, an intimate lodging (3 beds) situated on a private concession encompassing about 1/4 acre

gallery_5746_183_89506.jpg

 

Viewing can be very good in camp, with over 40 bird species recorded. May is usually the peak birding month as migrants arrive.

 

Camp facilities do bring to mind the Safaritalk discussion topic, "are artificial water holes good or bad?"

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The day began at 6:00 AM, when I awoke not to the sound of beating drums, but rather to that of the loud panting coming from the camp canine. Upon stepping outside moments later, I was treated to the calls of two western screech owls, one in camp, and the other in the adjoining concession.

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(okay, not my pic)

 

another Safaritalk discussion has centered around preferred vehicles. Today's safari utilized not a Toyota or a Land Rover, but a GIANT

gallery_5746_183_111153.jpg

 

Today's morning activity began at 6:34 AM, an 11.1 mile safari through the suburban and urban ecosystem.

After about 6.5 miles of suburban travel, with a few squirrels, crows, and scrub jays being spotted, I reached the

bike trail that parallels the Willamette River (9th largest in the continental US). To my left, the river

gallery_5746_183_54257.jpg

(note wildlife on near shore)

 

To my right, an urban wildlife reserve

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With wildlife

gallery_5746_183_194960.jpg

 

Nobody home at the osprey nest

gallery_5746_183_78458.jpg

 

But there are always pictures

gallery_5746_183_100570.jpg

 

The morning activity ends after I cross the river and enter the city.

gallery_5746_183_161277.jpg

 

The safari runs in the reverse direction for the afternoon activity.

Note: safaris may be cancelled due to high wind, heavy rain, or freezing temperatures, especially when combined with extreme darkness. Typical safari season is May through October.

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Wonderful trip report Pangolin. The reverse direction in the afternoon note is very funny. The owl photo is beautiful!

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Like the trip report Pangolin, thank you.

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I love the report, Pangolin , and the photos. I, too, have a water feature, right outside my bedroom window. I

 

opened the curtains at 7 am one morning recently and saw a fox boldly trotting past and through the hedge to my

 

neighbour's property. My camp is nowhere near as rural as yours, but does boast many birds, from herons, red

 

kites and magpies down to long tailed tits and wrens. Muntjac deer like eating my sweet peas, and several small

 

cats treat the place as their own! I'd upload a photo or two if I knew how to!

 

 

Jan

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Jan-

 

I'm not really rural. "Camp" is in the middle of the suburbs. My little 1/4 acre private concession is adjoined by a number of other concessions, each about 1/4 acre or smaller. Just a regular old suburban neighborhood in the U.S.

 

The only relatively large mammals seen in my "camp" are opossums (not native) and racoons, although deer and coyote are not far away. The racoons prevent any proliferation of fish life in my waterholes.

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Pangolin, my camp is smaller than yours, 1/3 of an acre, and probably more rural than yours. A small

 

riverside town of 1400 inhabitants, neighbouring concessions about the same size as mine. I do have fish, but

 

nothing more exotic than goldfish because the local herons rather like to help themselves. The best thing about

 

this location, although a pretty and desirable spot, is the fact that I'm thirty minutes from Heathrow and well

 

placed for a quick getaway to Botswana, my prefered destination in Africa. At present I'm counting down to

 

23 October for my next fix.

 

 

Jan

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Interesting thread! Brian’s video was lovely, but can’t be compared to Dance Fever … I don’t have any corellas or bunnies (just hares) and I don’t have a serious report like Pangolin’s, but in April 2008 I actually took my camera on a 15-minute game walk. What I found was too disturbing to share in Safaritalk.

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Not to be pedantic but last I looked, 1/3 was larger than 1/4 so I think Jan's camp wins the size stakes. :(

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Yes, I had noticed the math error, but I thought I'd wait for somebody else to mention it. No sense pointing out my own deficiencies. Maybe that means I have more wildlife per unit area in my private concession :( I doubt it though, based on Jan's description of critters at her pond.

 

Late addition: I do have rather extensive traversing rights however........the U.S. is pretty big.

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Yes, I had noticed the math error, but I thought I'd wait for somebody else to mention it. No sense pointing out my own deficiencies. Maybe that means I have more wildlife per unit area in my private concession :( I doubt it though, based on Jan's description of critters at her pond.

 

Late addition: I do have rather extensive traversing rights however........the U.S. is pretty big.

 

Yes indeed, and traversing rights are the big thing these days! :lol:

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