Brian's Art for Animals

What wildlife is in your Woods / Backyard?

481 posts in this topic

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MW1A2zXXyS4

 

This is my new short wildlife video and if you can you good folks of Safaritalk (As Safaritalk is the only forum i belong to these days) upload a short video in response to show me what lives around you. I know Dik Dik has a lot and all the Aussies on here must have some interesting wildlife neighbors as well.

Have a great week!

-Brian

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Which woods?

 

Central/West Europe is quite crowded, not much left of unspoilt nature. Germany has a population density of 232 people per square kilometre (would be much higher if we hadn't our new Eastern states). Nearly all of our soil is cultivated land, also most of the few forests we still have. UK has 246 people/sqkm.

 

Compare these numbers with South Africa (39), the United States (31) or even Australia (2.84). You must be quite lucky people over there.

 

I guess Hari can imagine what I'm talking about - India has 344 people/sqkm.

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Last Wednesday I had my sighting of the year - I saw a red fox crossing the road while driving home in the late evening.

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Yes. i see we have a listed 68,000 acres of protected forest in the county i am in (includes Chicago.) But most of the woods/forest are very small plots divided by busy streets with speeding cars and trucks. In most of the video I had to turn down the audio due to traffic noise, so i don't want the video to fool anyone into thinking the Chicago area is full of trees and animals. Just buildings and people and pollution. But it is nice to find some quiet nature spots I guess.

We all have it bad, and most people do not want to face the population/resources issues head on..so it remains the elephant in the room until it is too late, which may have already happened.

But anyways, it is nice to see what little creatures share the same space as we do.

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I am in a very suburbanized area outside of DC, but there is a narrow patch of woodland (~50m wide) behind my home with an ephemeral stream running through it. On the other side is an apartment complex. I regularly see raccoon, opposum, white-tailed deer, and a variety of songbirds. Lately, I have seen a coyote 3 times. Today, a pileated woodpecker.

 

For "real" wildlife, ask Sandy (divewop) in Colorado: innumerable elk in her backyard, along with black bears raiding her bird feeders, and many others...

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Only about 20 mins from my town, I've seen a lot of Large animals. Elephants many times, Gaur a couple of times, Spotted deer, Sambhar deer, Leopard once, Peacocks literally any time I'm there in the morning.

 

This is the outer range of the reserve forest. The Elephants., come here when it dry deep in the forests and there isn't any water ........ they do have conflicts with the villagers. I've seen the same herd about 4 or 5 times. The other animals are not so common - possibly in the winter time. From memory, that's the season I may hv seen them.

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Which woods?

 

Central/West Europe is quite crowded, not much left of unspoilt nature. Germany has a population density of 232 people per square kilometre (would be much higher if we hadn't our new Eastern states). Nearly all of our soil is cultivated land, also most of the few forests we still have. UK has 246 people/sqkm.

 

Compare these numbers with South Africa (39), the United States (31) or even Australia (2.84). You must be quite lucky people over there.

 

I guess Hari can imagine what I'm talking about - India has 344 people/sqkm.

 

Yes. Many would not know that the Kimberley of NW Australia is second to only Antarctica as the least populated area on the planet.

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I'm in Sydney, at Artarmon on the north shore. Even though there's a six-lane highway out front, out back there are possums in the trees. We often get Kookaburras (think giant kingfisher), rainbow lorrikeets and sometimes rosellas (red and blue parrots). A couple of times I've seen a tawny frogmouth in the tree out back, and once on our balcony (a frogmouth is a native australian owl-thing).

 

As to other wildlife... there is a house behind us with a few kids in their late teens and they've had some pretty interesting nocturnal get togethers. Mrs P looked over the balcony one night and saw a mating ritual taking place in the street!

 

We haven't seen a kill yet, but expect it's only a matter of time. As the weather warms up the young males become restless and territorial.

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Mrs P looked over the balcony one night and saw a mating ritual taking place in the street!
What an exciting cultural event! :D

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We are lucky where we live as we have over 50 species of birds in the garden and 2 types of possum, we occasionally get kangaroos grazing with the horses and have foxes and rabbits (pests) as well. There are emus next door but they don't cross the fence. We have bandicoots and have seen quolls (spotted, carnivorous marsupial). We have many lizards and snakes and rats and mice but I guess they aren't so welcome. The best thing is that we are still less than 30 mins from the centre of the city for any cultural needs. Paradise really, but I suppose someone has to live here. :D

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Bandicoots, emus and quolls, Twaffle? You should open up a game reserve! Put a safari tent in the back yard and charge visitis a grand a night!

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OK, I'd better join this...

 

We have a very small backyard 18 metres x 15 metres with a young Australian native garden planted in Aug' 2007.

We now have recorded 44 species of birds visiting the garden and that list is growing. The garden is also home to adult blue tongue skinks which are our (my son and I) pets.

 

We live 300 metres from the ocean and during the winter months I often see Humpback and Southern Right whales heading to their calving grounds further west along the coast. Dolphins & seals are seen all year round with many seal pups washed up on beaches from Oct - Jan. The seals also attract Great White sharks and a surfer was mauled by one at my local surfbreak almost 2 years ago.

 

The local golf course is 100 metres from our place and is tucked in behind the sanddunes. Walking in that area I ocassionally see echidnas. Kangaroos abound near some of the local surfing spots and as Twaffle said we need to be on the lookout for snakes.

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Bandicoots, emus and quolls, Twaffle? You should open up a game reserve! Put a safari tent in the back yard and charge visitis a grand a night!

Come for free and have a grand night!! Actually we aren't bush but next to bush and sanctuaries so we get their animal cast offs. Not quite so exciting. Geoff's place sounds pretty good but I think dikdik's is probably most productive.

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sounds like some good viewing ou there. Geoff, the whales must be an awesome sight to see.

I too have interesting human primate wildlife viewing from my small apartment. I get to see on weekends the neighbor lady sleeping off a good nights drinking in her car and last spring when one of the local bars closed some nice lad tossed a chair through my living room window from the street.

Not to mention my own version of the Mara crossing, in which i see stupid people run across the train tracks to get to their stop. i haven't seen a kill yet, but all in time.

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We live in the middle of suburbia, USA, but the neighborhood is somewhat mature (built from the 1950's through 70's), so trees are large and birds are relatively numerous. I have installed three ponds in the backyard, along with some native plants, so our bird list is also in the 40's. The best are probably pileated woodpeckers, western screech owl, hummingbirds, and our pair of mallards that visit almost every day in the spring. Sometimes in May we get some exciting migrants (my favorite is the black-headed grossbeak).

 

A little further out, I sometimes see coyotes on my 13-mile bike loop (still in the middle of suburbia).

 

Deer, elk, and black bear are relatively plentiful within 30 miles.

 

Even further out, my best U.S. sighting is probably a wolverine, in Glacier Park in Montana. I was awe-struck that a wolverine ran along the trail I was hiking, and nobody else saw it.

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I'm sure Nyama must have a smiley somewhere... but:

 

THIS THREAD IS USELESS WITHOUT PICTURES!

 

Now when I knock a golfball around badly at the local club, I often see interesting birdlife (aside from Albatrosses, and eagles which I never manage) - there is a lot of water so see various herons as well as geese and ducks, and many hoopoe at this time of year with their black and white plumage and orange crests. Snakes, turtles and the odd hedgehog too. Stray dogs which sometimes steal the ball from the fairway, and they're not the only ones: huge ravens often swoop down, grab the golfball in their beaks and fly off. In my case never closer to the hole, as where they drop it you should play it from...

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I'm sure Nyama must have a smiley somewhere... but:

 

THIS THREAD IS USELESS WITHOUT PICTURES!

 

 

My excuse … the nature of shy Australian marsupials makes photography of them a full time job. Sighting them sometimes is enough. You'll just have to take my word for it. :D I could photograph the kangaroos out in the paddock but it doesn't seem unusual enough. I definitely could takes pix of the rabbits but I would prefer to shoot them with something other than a camera. :D

I'll never photograph the snakes, too much camera shake.

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Which woods?

 

Central/West Europe is quite crowded, not much left of unspoilt nature. Germany has a population density of 232 people per square kilometre (would be much higher if we hadn't our new Eastern states). Nearly all of our soil is cultivated land, also most of the few forests we still have. UK has 246 people/sqkm.

 

Compare these numbers with South Africa (39), the United States (31) or even Australia (2.84). You must be quite lucky people over there.

 

I guess Hari can imagine what I'm talking about - India has 344 people/sqkm.

 

Very interesting indeed.

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Ah yes, that's more or less the average ....... but, think about a city like Mumbai .......... CROWDED!!!

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Ah yes, that's more or less the average ....... but, think about a city like Mumbai .......... CROWDED!!!

 

Yet you still have elephants in your "back garden"!!!! I expected the human animal conflict is to be far worse considering the population density.

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A few years back when I was involved in farming every season we employed foreign workers from Australia, New Zealand & Africa as well as students from the local agricultural college which had a number of overseas students.

The pea crop was spread out the Romney Marsh area & surrounding districts.

 

The story goes of a South African Student who got very excited, early one morning, when he saw elephants on the hillside over looking the field (Paddock) where the team were harvesting, a twenty four hour operation.

 

"I've just seen elephants!"

"I did not know you had elephants here in England!"

 

It was a a few days before the team told him that he had seen the elephants at Port Lympne Animal Park, part of the Aspinal Foundation but by then he had told everyone he met that he was amazed we still had elephants here in the UK.

:lol:

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The problem here (atleast in South India) is, that the ancient migratory routes are either cut off or severely encroached by settlements ........ and hence the conflicts, more during the dry season when the Elephants need plenty of water.

 

The monsoons have just arrived, albeit a couple weeks late - so, I guess there won't be any Elephant sightings for a month or two!

 

Btw, this feels like a gloomy/overcast day ....... in and out drizzle as I type this.

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To keep the Game Warden happy, a photo taken of some little corellas, not in our garden but down the road.

DSCF0072.jpg

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This is a great topic, Brian! I am still reeling from my first and only sighting of a black squirrel two days ago in the park next to where I live. The rest of the squirrels are all reddish brown. Since I am just up the coast from you, my wildlife is pretty much the same as yours. Where's that squirrel fanatic who popped into safaritalk a few months ago?

 

I bet some of your video of local animals was actually more challenging to shoot than of the exotic African animals. The robin for example does not stay put like a resting lion.

 

This gem of a location where I live--between two county parks--produces deer (I had 2 great sightings yesterday while riding on the bikepath), possums, skunks, gray foxes but not since the coyotes moved in, woodchucks, raccoons, rabbits, wild turkey (seen only twice), great blue herons, green herons, mallards, merganzers, muskrats, turtles, and once in a while the beautiful red fox.

 

The park is also where my own cat and domestic rabbit came from years ago. Apparently people see the park as an area to dump unwanted pets. Both are now gone, but had good lives with me.

 

When I got to the rabbit in your video, I was reminded of how I spent my time about a week ago waiting for the bus to Wisconsin, after arriving in O'Hare from my Pantanal trip. There was a baby bunny hiding in the lillies that would hop out onto the grass and eat. It was very used to people so I got out my camera and got down on all fours and started taking photos, the final wildlife shots of my trip.

 

What a beautiful tree full of birds, Twaffle. I'll offer up a single bunny I took last week at O'Hare.post-108-1247318089_thumb.jpg

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This is a great topic, Brian! I am still reeling from my first and only sighting of a black squirrel two days ago in the park next to where I live. The rest of the squirrels are all reddish brown. Since I am just up the coast from you, my wildlife is pretty much the same as yours. Where's that squirrel fanatic who popped into safaritalk a few months ago?

 

I bet some of your video of local animals was actually more challenging to shoot than of the exotic African animals. The robin for example does not stay put as a resting lion does.

 

Like Mrs. P, I've also witnessed a mating ritual out of my window. Disturbingly it was two of my neighbors on the bluff (and in the buff--couldn't resist) overlooking Lake Michigan. Now I must banish this unsettling vision from my mind because one of them still lives here.

 

Hari, I wonder if elephants so close to where you live put them in the same category for you as deer are for me. A cool sighting, but not one I necessarily stop for.

 

This gem of a location where I live--between two county parks--produces deer (I had 2 great sightings yesterday while riding on the bikepath), possums, skunks, gray foxes but not since the coyotes moved in, woodchucks, raccoons, rabbits, wild turkey (seen only twice), great blue herons, green herons, mallards, merganzers, muskrats, turtles, and once in a while the beautiful red fox.

 

The park is also where my own cat and domestic rabbit came from years ago. Apparently people see the park as an area to dump unwanted pets. Both are now gone, but had good lives with me.

 

When I got to the rabbit in your video, I was reminded of how I spent my time about a week ago waiting for the bus to Wisconsin, after arriving in O'Hare from my Pantanal trip. There was a baby bunny hiding in the lillies that would hop out onto the grass and eat. It was very used to people so I got out my camera and got down on all fours and started taking photos, the final wildlife shots of my trip.

 

What a beautiful tree full of birds, Twaffle. I'll offer up a single bunny I took last week at O'Hare airport in Chicago.post-108-1247318089_thumb.jpg

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