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Eating wildlife you see on Safari


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#61 madaboutcheetah

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 08:32 AM

@LastChanceSafaris - I haven't seen game meat in menus in Bots lodges since maybe 2006 or 2007

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#62 LastChanceSafaris

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 09:24 AM

@madaboutcheetah

Some operators (mostly the corporate set) won't put it on the menu because of a) an 'ethical' standpoint, B) because their camps need to follow a weekly menu to prevent repetition for guests on their circuit, and c) seasonality and availability makes B) difficult. Quite a few owner operated lodges still place it on their menus when it is available.


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#63 Bugs

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Posted 31 October 2015 - 09:57 AM

What an interesting topic!

Let me add an interesting dimension to it, but forgive me if my stats are out, though it won't be by much.

In the '80's when SA was suffering its worst drought in living memory, cattle farmers, throughout what is now Limpopo Province, were near bankrupted through massive stock fatalities. They noticed that despite the cattle dying, the previously 'nuisance' game was maintaining. This was the beginning of a game ranch explosion in SA. Since then wildlife (across all species and across the country) has apparently enjoyed an 1800% increase in numbers and previously overgrazed land has enjoyed substantial rehabilitation. What fuels this economy is largely the venison market.

 

 

I think what you said here applied to Madikwe. But the game farming industry in SA had started long before 1980. One of the early pioneers were Jim Feely and Norman Deane who left Natal Parks board to open "Ubizane" game reserve in 1970. The first legal white rhino hunt took place in this reserve in 1971. Zimbabwe (Rhodesia) had already had some success in private farming of wildlife prior to this. 

 

However an important legislative change was made in 1983 when game were no longer as "res nullius" (belonging to nobody in particular) to "occupatio" according to Rabie and Fuggle - this was a critical intervention allowed for wildlife ownership, and in turn this was what spawned the expansion of wildlife on private land.  


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#64 Tom Kellie

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Posted 01 November 2015 - 10:24 PM

@madaboutcheetah

Some operators (mostly the corporate set) won't put it on the menu because of a) an 'ethical' standpoint, B) because their camps need to follow a weekly menu to prevent repetition for guests on their circuit, and c) seasonality and availability makes B) difficult. Quite a few owner operated lodges still place it on their menus when it is available.

 

~ @LastChanceSafaris

 

Thank you for the clarification about camp menu practices.

 

I'm unclear as to what the ethical standpoint might entail, i.e. how eating farmed game might be perceived as being unethical.

 

From what you've written, the lack of reliable year-round sources affects game being offered on menus.

 

Might there eventually be shifts in game husbandry which would facilitate it being more regularly offered?

 

Tom K.



#65 Tom Kellie

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Posted 01 November 2015 - 10:27 PM

I think what you said here applied to Madikwe. But the game farming industry in SA had started long before 1980. One of the early pioneers were Jim Feely and Norman Deane who left Natal Parks board to open "Ubizane" game reserve in 1970. The first legal white rhino hunt took place in this reserve in 1971. Zimbabwe (Rhodesia) had already had some success in private farming of wildlife prior to this. 

 

However an important legislative change was made in 1983 when game were no longer as "res nullius" (belonging to nobody in particular) to "occupatio" according to Rabie and Fuggle - this was a critical intervention allowed for wildlife ownership, and in turn this was what spawned the expansion of wildlife on private land.  

 

~ @Bugs

 

Your clarification above is very helpful.

 

I hadn't realized that the shift in legal reasoning which facilitated wildlife ownership dated back to 1983.

 

It's a concept about which it's required time for me to fully grasp.

 

Tom K.



#66 ZaminOz

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 03:53 AM

Tom

I think by "unethical" they mean that guests may have a negative reaction to the idea of any game meat being on the plate irrespective of its origin. Eating game meat is perceived by some to be linked to hunting. What safari camp would want to risk being the subject of a social media vilification campaign?


Edited by ZaminOz, 03 November 2015 - 03:54 AM.

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#67 Tom Kellie

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 04:05 AM

Tom

I think by "unethical" they mean that guests may have a negative reaction to the idea of any game meat being on the plate irrespective of its origin. Eating game meat is perceived by some to be linked to hunting. What safari camp would want to risk being the subject of a social media vilification campaign?

 

~ @ZaminOz

 

I really appreciate your clarification of the supposedly unethical aspects of offering game as a menu choice.

 

Without your helpful explanation I would have remained in the dark, as it would never have occurred to me that game dishes were linked to hunting.

 

Now that you've spelled it out, I see that there may be a significant segment of safari clients who are unaware of game farms.

 

Similarly, where I live most urban supermarket consumers presuppose that salmon cuts in the seafood section were netted in the wild, although packages in many cases explicitly state that they were farmed.

 

I've never run up against strong anti-hunting feelings, thus wasn't aware that the imagined linking of game dishes with hunted wildlife might be a serious issue.

 

Safaritalk is my continuing education site of choice. 

 

Thank you for sorting this out. Safari camp operators seemingly contend with a host of perceptions which may or may not be linked to reality.

 

Tom K.


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