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Eating wildlife you see on Safari


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#41 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 07:27 AM

I do not eat red meat , as previously  discussed there are possibilities for combing game farming  and mid end tourism

 

not everyone wants high end luxury and big 5

 

there would be a market for comfortable accom  with friendly family service , good food  on a game farm with good numbers of general plains including fair numbers of giraffe and zebras

 

well the farmer gets money from the game farm and the visitors 

 

it would not work  with predators , if there are no buffalos people could do their own hikes on well defined paths


Wild Africa is in my blood. All life is sacred and interconnected. for the animals are fellow nations caught in the splendor and trevail of the earth.


#42 Big_Dog

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 09:08 AM

@JohnR - Very interesting...hope to try a bit someday!

Something I also forgot to add that's been mentioned before, is how much better game is for the enviroment, especially water independent species. Replacing cattle with Eland would be great.


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#43 Tom Kellie

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 08:32 AM

@Big_Dog I don't have much of a memory for flavours but the giraffe meat was special. It had been cured in the style of bresaola and used to appear at breakfast when we made up our lunch packs. A rich dark meat, it tasted of giraffe :)

The study the hunter/scientist was conducting was aimed at getting carnivore densities on Namibian game farms. These were quoted in a report by Laurie Marker on cheetah numbers to the big cat specialist group of the IUCN.

 

~ @JohnR

 

Ha! That's the most apt dining review that I've read in years!

 

After descriptions of ‘notes of pheasant coupled with shitake’ (!!!), “tasted of giraffe” hits the spot.

 

Welcome humor and reality on a muggy autumn afternoon.

 

Tom K.


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#44 Tom Kellie

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 08:40 AM

I must say that living here, I have seen a huge increase in game meat availability. Just about every supermarket is keeping it, and some butchers are now specialising in it. 

 

Even the shops in Kruger have devoted a large amount of help space to biltong and droe-wors - each well labeled as to whatever animal it is. 

 

I know some people who specifically eat game meat, as they believe its the responsible thing to do. 

 

~ @Bugs

 

Why are there those who feel that it's responsible to eat game meat?

 

This is an unfamiliar concept to me.

 

Is it because the game species are endemic to the area and cattle are not?

 

Or is it due to other considerations?

 

Tom K.



#45 Bugs

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 05:22 PM

@Tom Kellie to me its a more about a better land utilisation option. There is so much more than just the mammals that occupy the area. Because wildlife are far less destructive and demanding on the land, many other smaller insects forms and birds also thrive. Also game meat is higher in protein and lower in fat, and free of hormones and antibiotics. Internal and external paracides are also harmful to insects and also birds. Ox-peckers for example suffer as a result. Wildlife farmers are also more tolerant of predators. 


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There's none so blind as those who will not see.


#46 Tom Kellie

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 05:29 PM

@Tom Kellie to me its a more about a better land utilisation option. There is so much more than just the mammals that occupy the area. Because wildlife are far less destructive and demanding on the land, many other smaller insects forms and birds also thrive. Also game meat is higher in protein and lower in fat, and free of hormones and antibiotics. Internal and external paracides are also harmful to insects and also birds. Ox-peckers for example suffer as a result. Wildlife farmers are also more tolerant of predators. 

 

~ @Bugs

 

I hope that you won't mind if I quote you verbatim in classes this week.

 

If so, let me know and I won't do so.

 

What you've explained above is to the point, insightful and what needs to be heard here.

 

I'm chagrined to tell you that I'd never read anything like this before, nor had I thought of it.

 

After visiting your nation, last week, I'm far more open to what you've explained.

 

My students aren't likely to be as fortunate as I've been, so I'll explain the wildlife vs livestock issue, giving full credit to your elegant explanation.

 

A hearty thanks!

 

BTW: I've decided tonight to return to South Africa for another safari in late January, 2016.

 

Tom K.



#47 ZaminOz

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 04:04 AM

There are few meals that I have enjoyed in my life that would top a couple of good grilled warthog steaks served with mashed potato and a good gravy with corn on the cob and some steamed veges on the side... Add to that a good wine, the ambiance of a thatched open sided dining area, lit by a couple of paraffin lamps and a welcoming post dinner fire flickering in the darkness outside. Heaven :) 


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#48 Tom Kellie

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 06:16 AM

There are few meals that I have enjoyed in my life that would top a couple of good grilled warthog steaks served with mashed potato and a good gravy with corn on the cob and some steamed veges on the side... Add to that a good wine, the ambiance of a thatched open sided dining area, lit by a couple of paraffin lamps and a welcoming post dinner fire flickering in the darkness outside. Heaven :)

 

~ @ZaminOz

 

Thou persuadest me through describing such fine fare!

 

Funny how slowly accumulating safari experience and regular reading of varied Safaritalk posts modifies my outlook.

 

What you've eloquently described above is vivid in my mind's eye.

 

I'd never thought of eating wildlife, but am slowly shifting.

 

Thanks!

 

Tom K.


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#49 Big Andy

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 06:24 AM

There are few meals that I have enjoyed in my life that would top a couple of good grilled warthog steaks served with mashed potato and a good gravy with corn on the cob and some steamed veges on the side... Add to that a good wine, the ambiance of a thatched open sided dining area, lit by a couple of paraffin lamps and a welcoming post dinner fire flickering in the darkness outside. Heaven :)

 

Heaven is a bit of an under statement my mouth is watering at the thought.

 

Personally I have no objections to eating any kind of meat so long as it's time on the planet was good and healthy and it's end quick and clean. Whether it's cattle, sheep, or something more unusual to my western pallet like warthog etc it's still the end for that individual. As a species it must of course be sustainable and not damage it's ecosystem but the thought eating wild meat doesn't bother me in the least.


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#50 Peter Connan

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 05:40 AM

I want to go one step further and state that in my opinion, anybody who follows a vegetarian diet in the belief that it benefits conversion is fooling themselves.

I say this for very much the same reasons that farming with game is better for the environment than cattle are.
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#51 ellenhighwater

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 02:29 PM

@Tom Kellie to me its a more about a better land utilisation option. There is so much more than just the mammals that occupy the area. Because wildlife are far less destructive and demanding on the land, many other smaller insects forms and birds also thrive. Also game meat is higher in protein and lower in fat, and free of hormones and antibiotics. Internal and external paracides are also harmful to insects and also birds. Ox-peckers for example suffer as a result. Wildlife farmers are also more tolerant of predators. 

 

Not to mention what cattle farming is doing to Africa's (and India's) vulture population.   

 

http://www.nytimes.c...rhead.html?_r=0

 

Besides, Eland is the king of meats. Mmmmmm Eland.  My only complaint is when it comes out over-cooked.  Good, fresh game meat should just look at the grill.


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#52 Tom Kellie

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 09:00 PM

I want to go one step further and state that in my opinion, anybody who follows a vegetarian diet in the belief that it benefits conversion is fooling themselves.

I say this for very much the same reasons that farming with game is better for the environment than cattle are.

 

~ @Peter Connan

 

In other words, for similar reasons that @Bugs mentioned?

 

Where I live vegetarian diets are scarce to non-existent.

 

While in South Africa earlier this month I tried a vegetarian meal one day.

 

Not bad at all!

 

Were I to shift to become a 365 day a year vegetarian, I'd up my already high rate of vegetable soup consumption.

 

A life with minestrone everyday would entice me...

 

Tom K.



#53 Tom Kellie

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 09:02 PM

Not to mention what cattle farming is doing to Africa's (and India's) vulture population.   

 

http://www.nytimes.c...rhead.html?_r=0

 

Besides, Eland is the king of meats. Mmmmmm Eland.  My only complaint is when it comes out over-cooked.  Good, fresh game meat should just look at the grill.

 

~ @ellenhighwater

 

That's very useful to know.

 

I had no idea that eland was so savory.

 

If offered it in the Leopard Hills boma this coming January, I'll specify lightly grilled.

 

Thank you!

 

Tom K.



#54 optig

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Posted 26 October 2015 - 06:14 AM

I've eaten various game meat on safari and I have quite enjoyed it. I've eaten gemsbok in Namibia, kudu in Zimbabwe, crocodile in South Africa and various other cuts of game in Capetown. I enjoy it if prepared properly.

#55 Tom Kellie

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Posted 27 October 2015 - 12:57 AM

I've eaten various game meat on safari and I have quite enjoyed it. I've eaten gemsbok in Namibia, kudu in Zimbabwe, crocodile in South Africa and various other cuts of game in Capetown. I enjoy it if prepared properly.

 

~ @optig

 

With such broad game dining experience, did any particular meat stand out?

 

If you could do so again, what was especially delectable?

 

@ellenhighwater has mentioned eland.

 

Tom K.



#56 optig

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Posted 28 October 2015 - 06:24 AM

@TomKellie

I can't remember what was my favorite game meat. I just know that I enjoyed all of them. I look forward to returning to Capetown when I can eat more game meat. I am also looking forward to visit Pamushana and Tswalu Kalahari where they serve game.
I have often wished that there would be more game meat available in Nairobi, Kenya other than ostrich and crocodile.
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#57 Tom Kellie

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Posted 28 October 2015 - 07:13 AM

@TomKellie

I can't remember what was my favorite game meat. I just know that I enjoyed all of them. I look forward to returning to Capetown when I can eat more game meat. I am also looking forward to visit Pamushana and Tswalu Kalahari where they serve game.
I have often wished that there would be more game meat available in Nairobi, Kenya other than ostrich and crocodile.

 

~ @optig

 

Thank you for explaining that. I hadn't realized that ostrich and crocodile were prevalent in Nairobi.

 

Capetown is known for serving game?

 

This topic interests me as heretofore I've never knowingly eaten anywhere that served game.

 

It seems that I need to get out and about more!

 

Tom K.



#58 optig

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Posted 28 October 2015 - 07:29 AM


@TomKellie
Ostrich and crocodile are not prevalent in Nairobi but they are served at Carnivore and some butchers in Nairobi.
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#59 Tom Kellie

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Posted 28 October 2015 - 07:37 AM

@TomKellie
Ostrich and crocodile are not prevalent in Nairobi but they are served at Carnivore and some butchers in Nairobi.

 

~ @optig

 

Thank you for the clarification.

 

I'm sorry that I misunderstood.

 

In thinking over your comments, it surprises me that game isn't more frequently offered, if indeed it's flavorsome.

 

Beef and pork dishes are nearly always on offer, yet the conditions necessary to raise cattle and swine may not be the ideal fit for much of Africa.

 

Were I in Kenya, I'd most likely refrain from stating that too loudly...

 

Tom K.



#60 LastChanceSafaris

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 08:02 AM

What an interesting topic!

Let me add an interesting dimension to it, but forgive me if my stats are out, though it won't be by much.

In the '80's when SA was suffering its worst drought in living memory, cattle farmers, throughout what is now Limpopo Province, were near bankrupted through massive stock fatalities. They noticed that despite the cattle dying, the previously 'nuisance' game was maintaining. This was the beginning of a game ranch explosion in SA. Since then wildlife (across all species and across the country) has apparently enjoyed an 1800% increase in numbers and previously overgrazed land has enjoyed substantial rehabilitation. What fuels this economy is largely the venison market.

Here in Botswana, we serve and enjoy a variety of venisons - all of which are harvested sustainably from game ranches near Francistown, Ghanzi and the Tuli Block. 


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