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Eating wildlife you see on Safari


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66 replies to this topic

#21 Ellie

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 08:06 PM

I'd rather see some of the abundant game in the Masai Mara hunted for food and eliminate some of those very destructive cattle herds - but try convincing the Masai!
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Ellie

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#22 Nyamera

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 08:37 PM

Ellie, I'm glad you don't have a say in the Mara.
Siku ya kufa nyani miti yote huteleza.

READ THIS PLEASE

#23 Atravelynn

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 10:00 PM

I prefer not to, just as I prefer not eating cows and pigs over here. Good question that would likely arise at least once during most safaris when kudu or ostrich makes its way onto the menu. I did find it odd when I shared a vehicle with people who commented on our various sightings with the quality of the flesh the creature possessed.

Consuming a local antelope or bird may leave a smaller carbon footprint than a hamburger.
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#24 Bugs

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 04:54 AM

Turning vegetarian?


Being a vegetarian obviously makes even more ecological sense, but I'm not going there.


I disagree. Growing vegetables makes less ecological sense than 1 and 2.

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#25 madaboutcheetah

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 04:58 AM

Turning vegetarian?


Being a vegetarian obviously makes even more ecological sense, but I'm not going there.


I disagree. Growing vegetables makes less ecological sense than 1 and 2.




Really? I thought cattle rearing was the worst in terms of carbon footprint?

I think for certain blood types or ethnicities, their bodies don't digest protein very efficiently and it ultimately, leads to a host of diseases including cancers.

Edited by madaboutcheetah, 04 November 2010 - 04:59 AM.

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#26 Bugs

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 05:58 AM

Planting vegetables needs the area to be completely void of just about any wild animal, bird or even insect. The ground is tilled and pumped with chemicals which leach into the water system causing destruction of the water system. Then of course the insecticides are sprayed to keep the bugs off.

Vegetables are planted near rivers as the water is needed for irrigation, and thus cutting off the water source from natural wild animals.

They also say that if you drive a hybrid car it has a lower carbon footprint, but if you look at the manufacturing process of the Hybrid cars; - you may be left asking questions again.
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There's none so blind as those who will not see.


#27 madaboutcheetah

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 06:03 AM

Good point!

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#28 JohnR

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 07:43 AM

I've been to Carnivore and wouldn't go back. Not because I am against eating game but because it is now more show than substance. There are other newer Brazillian style restaurants in Nairobi which have good food.

At least Joe's Beerhouse in Windhoek is still more a restaurant than a tourist sight.

I agree with Dikdik and Pangolin that raising game is preferable to non-native species and I enjoyed eating hartebeest and eland on my most recent trip to Namibia.
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#29 Pangolin

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 02:48 PM

I've enjoyed Joe's beerhouse myself. Had a nice gemsbok steak there.

I actually do believe that subsistence hunting of wild animals has the least environmental impact of all (including raising veggies as Dik dik described), but there are obviously too many of us for that.

Therefore, I stick with sustainably raised native meat as the way to go for carnivores like myself. It is also generally healthier than eating mass produced domesticated stock.
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#30 tonypark

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 02:49 PM

My personal faves are:

Springbok carpaccio

Kudu fillet (yum)

Wildebeest neck (poitjie)

Gemsbok biltong.

I'm sitting in Kruger right now, watching the cutest little bushbuck just outside the fence. I wonder how she'd taste, sauteed with a nice Chianti....

On a more serious note... On a recent trip to the Serengeti I was mightily impressed with how the Masaai don't eat game meat (hence the number of wildebeest), but a little disappointed that every rhino in the park had been killed many years ago (and subsequently restocked with rhino from that nation of carnivorous antelope-eating South Africans).

Edited by tonypark, 04 November 2010 - 02:50 PM.


#31 hanzophoto

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 06:03 PM

as a vegetarian I have a very strict policy on eating meat, I was a non vegetarian for many years ... ...

- If I shoot it, I eat it. Though most of my shooting now is done with a 300mm Nikon f2.8

- and then if I accidentally take a meat somosa well what can I do?

As for hunters and eaters of game meat, go for it, you are the best anti poaching mechanism the wildlife has, bar none.

#32 kittykat23uk

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 08:01 AM

I tried going veggie in my teens but I didn't get far with it because I didn't really like many vegetables back then and I love meat too much. I have eaten Wildebeest in Kruger but it was really tough. I really enjoy ostrich- but have only had that in the UK and I believe it is/was farmed. It's probably imported now. I have no problem eating venison, duck and other forms of poultry even though I enjoy watching antelope as well as ducks and other birds. I can take or leave Kangaroo- it's a bit tough. But I refuse to eat rabbit/hare as I have great affection for them and I keep them as pets.
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#33 JohnR

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 09:30 PM

I really enjoy ostrich- but have only had that in the UK and I believe it is/was farmed. It's probably imported now.


There are a number of farms in the UK keeping 'exotic' species such as water buffalo for cheese making, as well as farming ostrich, kangaroo and various antelopes. My South African butcher reopened in Coventry and sells kudu raised in Herefordshire.

So far as rabbits are concerned, it was standard fare in my working class family when I was growing up. They were sold in Leeds market with the heads still on complete with fur and as my mother was squeamish it was my job as a kid to cut the head off and skin it. My reward was being given the tongue to eat.
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#34 kittykat23uk

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 07:49 AM

TMI JohnR!
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If an experience is amazing enough to be "once in a lifetime," I want to do it every year.
Alex: "Whoa! Hold up there a second, fuzzbucket. You mean like, uh, the live in a mud hut wipe yourself with a leaf type wild?"
King Julian: “Who wipes?”

#35 Game Warden

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Posted 05 October 2015 - 09:36 AM

Going back over this old topic, some of the issues raised are those which oft come up. Whether private ownership of wildlife and farming native species is better for the natural environment than livestock farming: although which of these has a greater revenue stream, especially from overseas sales?

 

So have you ever eaten game meat on safari? If so, which, and where?


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#36 Whyone?

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Posted 05 October 2015 - 10:16 AM

Warthog stir-fried with ginger - yum!



#37 JohnR

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Posted 05 October 2015 - 12:21 PM

Since 6 of my last 8 visits to Namibia were on game farms and with the other 2 I ate in restaurants with game on the menu I have eaten mostly local game animals including gemsbok, eland, Impala, hartebeest, wildebeest, kudu, springbok, giraffe, warthog. The game was shot on the farms by a professional hunter though in one case he was also the chief scientist leading the study on cheetah and leopard I was volunteering with.
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#38 Big_Dog

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Posted 05 October 2015 - 02:58 PM

I have no qualms with it, and find game meat delicious to eat and enjoyable to cook / braai. Got most of it from game butchers in KZN, or restaurants in Cape Town in my respective visits there...have eaten most of the ungulate species that are available, but never hartebeest or giraffe! Must say I'm quite partial to most of them, but springbok cuts can be quite small. I also think warthog tastes a bit less rich / strongly than normal pork, and much less so than wild boar or bushpig.
Here in the UK in Wales at uni, the market does Pheasant very cheap in hunting season if you buy it whole and dress it yourself. Good eating. :) A number of other gamebirds are available too...not sure if I can bring myself to eat a little Woodcock though. :(

@JohnR - what did giraffe and hartebeest taste like? Also, what was the cat researcher investigating with his study, sounds interesting?


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#39 JohnR

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Posted 05 October 2015 - 09:08 PM

@Big_Dog I don't have much of a memory for flavours but the giraffe meat was special. It had been cured in the style of bresaola and used to appear at breakfast when we made up our lunch packs. A rich dark meat, it tasted of giraffe :)

The study the hunter/scientist was conducting was aimed at getting carnivore densities on Namibian game farms. These were quoted in a report by Laurie Marker on cheetah numbers to the big cat specialist group of the IUCN.
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#40 Bugs

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 07:15 AM

I must say that living here, I have seen a huge increase in game meat availability. Just about every supermarket is keeping it, and some butchers are now specialising in it. 

 

Even the shops in Kruger have devoted a large amount of help space to biltong and droe-wors - each well labeled as to whatever animal it is. 

 

I know some people who specifically eat game meat, as they believe its the responsible thing to do. 


There's none so blind as those who will not see.






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