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Game Warden

Eating wildlife you see on Safari

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Planting vegetables needs the area to be completely void of just about any wild animal, bird or even insect. The ground is tilled and pumped with chemicals which leach into the water system causing destruction of the water system. Then of course the insecticides are sprayed to keep the bugs off.

 

Vegetables are planted near rivers as the water is needed for irrigation, and thus cutting off the water source from natural wild animals.

 

They also say that if you drive a hybrid car it has a lower carbon footprint, but if you look at the manufacturing process of the Hybrid cars; - you may be left asking questions again.

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Good point!

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I've been to Carnivore and wouldn't go back. Not because I am against eating game but because it is now more show than substance. There are other newer Brazillian style restaurants in Nairobi which have good food.

 

At least Joe's Beerhouse in Windhoek is still more a restaurant than a tourist sight.

 

I agree with Dikdik and Pangolin that raising game is preferable to non-native species and I enjoyed eating hartebeest and eland on my most recent trip to Namibia.

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I've enjoyed Joe's beerhouse myself. Had a nice gemsbok steak there.

 

I actually do believe that subsistence hunting of wild animals has the least environmental impact of all (including raising veggies as Dik dik described), but there are obviously too many of us for that.

 

Therefore, I stick with sustainably raised native meat as the way to go for carnivores like myself. It is also generally healthier than eating mass produced domesticated stock.

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Posted (edited)

My personal faves are:

 

Springbok carpaccio

 

Kudu fillet (yum)

 

Wildebeest neck (poitjie)

 

Gemsbok biltong.

 

I'm sitting in Kruger right now, watching the cutest little bushbuck just outside the fence. I wonder how she'd taste, sauteed with a nice Chianti....

 

On a more serious note... On a recent trip to the Serengeti I was mightily impressed with how the Masaai don't eat game meat (hence the number of wildebeest), but a little disappointed that every rhino in the park had been killed many years ago (and subsequently restocked with rhino from that nation of carnivorous antelope-eating South Africans).

Edited by tonypark

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as a vegetarian I have a very strict policy on eating meat, I was a non vegetarian for many years ... ...

 

- If I shoot it, I eat it. Though most of my shooting now is done with a 300mm Nikon f2.8

 

- and then if I accidentally take a meat somosa well what can I do?

 

As for hunters and eaters of game meat, go for it, you are the best anti poaching mechanism the wildlife has, bar none.

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I tried going veggie in my teens but I didn't get far with it because I didn't really like many vegetables back then and I love meat too much. I have eaten Wildebeest in Kruger but it was really tough. I really enjoy ostrich- but have only had that in the UK and I believe it is/was farmed. It's probably imported now. I have no problem eating venison, duck and other forms of poultry even though I enjoy watching antelope as well as ducks and other birds. I can take or leave Kangaroo- it's a bit tough. But I refuse to eat rabbit/hare as I have great affection for them and I keep them as pets.

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I really enjoy ostrich- but have only had that in the UK and I believe it is/was farmed. It's probably imported now.

 

There are a number of farms in the UK keeping 'exotic' species such as water buffalo for cheese making, as well as farming ostrich, kangaroo and various antelopes. My South African butcher reopened in Coventry and sells kudu raised in Herefordshire.

 

So far as rabbits are concerned, it was standard fare in my working class family when I was growing up. They were sold in Leeds market with the heads still on complete with fur and as my mother was squeamish it was my job as a kid to cut the head off and skin it. My reward was being given the tongue to eat.

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TMI JohnR!

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Going back over this old topic, some of the issues raised are those which oft come up. Whether private ownership of wildlife and farming native species is better for the natural environment than livestock farming: although which of these has a greater revenue stream, especially from overseas sales?

 

So have you ever eaten game meat on safari? If so, which, and where?

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Warthog stir-fried with ginger - yum!

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Since 6 of my last 8 visits to Namibia were on game farms and with the other 2 I ate in restaurants with game on the menu I have eaten mostly local game animals including gemsbok, eland, Impala, hartebeest, wildebeest, kudu, springbok, giraffe, warthog. The game was shot on the farms by a professional hunter though in one case he was also the chief scientist leading the study on cheetah and leopard I was volunteering with.

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I have no qualms with it, and find game meat delicious to eat and enjoyable to cook / braai. Got most of it from game butchers in KZN, or restaurants in Cape Town in my respective visits there...have eaten most of the ungulate species that are available, but never hartebeest or giraffe! Must say I'm quite partial to most of them, but springbok cuts can be quite small. I also think warthog tastes a bit less rich / strongly than normal pork, and much less so than wild boar or bushpig.
Here in the UK in Wales at uni, the market does Pheasant very cheap in hunting season if you buy it whole and dress it yourself. Good eating. :) A number of other gamebirds are available too...not sure if I can bring myself to eat a little Woodcock though. :(

@@JohnR - what did giraffe and hartebeest taste like? Also, what was the cat researcher investigating with his study, sounds interesting?

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@@Big_Dog I don't have much of a memory for flavours but the giraffe meat was special. It had been cured in the style of bresaola and used to appear at breakfast when we made up our lunch packs. A rich dark meat, it tasted of giraffe :)

 

The study the hunter/scientist was conducting was aimed at getting carnivore densities on Namibian game farms. These were quoted in a report by Laurie Marker on cheetah numbers to the big cat specialist group of the IUCN.

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I must say that living here, I have seen a huge increase in game meat availability. Just about every supermarket is keeping it, and some butchers are now specialising in it.

 

Even the shops in Kruger have devoted a large amount of help space to biltong and droe-wors - each well labeled as to whatever animal it is.

 

I know some people who specifically eat game meat, as they believe its the responsible thing to do.

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I do not eat red meat , as previously discussed there are possibilities for combing game farming and mid end tourism

 

not everyone wants high end luxury and big 5

 

there would be a market for comfortable accom with friendly family service , good food on a game farm with good numbers of general plains including fair numbers of giraffe and zebras

 

well the farmer gets money from the game farm and the visitors

 

it would not work with predators , if there are no buffalos people could do their own hikes on well defined paths

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@@JohnR - Very interesting...hope to try a bit someday!

Something I also forgot to add that's been mentioned before, is how much better game is for the enviroment, especially water independent species. Replacing cattle with Eland would be great.

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@@Big_Dog I don't have much of a memory for flavours but the giraffe meat was special. It had been cured in the style of bresaola and used to appear at breakfast when we made up our lunch packs. A rich dark meat, it tasted of giraffe :)

 

The study the hunter/scientist was conducting was aimed at getting carnivore densities on Namibian game farms. These were quoted in a report by Laurie Marker on cheetah numbers to the big cat specialist group of the IUCN.

 

~ @@JohnR

 

Ha! That's the most apt dining review that I've read in years!

After descriptions of ‘notes of pheasant coupled with shitake’ (!!!), “tasted of giraffe” hits the spot.

Welcome humor and reality on a muggy autumn afternoon.

Tom K.

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I must say that living here, I have seen a huge increase in game meat availability. Just about every supermarket is keeping it, and some butchers are now specialising in it.

 

Even the shops in Kruger have devoted a large amount of help space to biltong and droe-wors - each well labeled as to whatever animal it is.

 

I know some people who specifically eat game meat, as they believe its the responsible thing to do.

 

~ @@Bugs

 

Why are there those who feel that it's responsible to eat game meat?

This is an unfamiliar concept to me.

Is it because the game species are endemic to the area and cattle are not?

Or is it due to other considerations?

Tom K.

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@@Tom Kellie to me its a more about a better land utilisation option. There is so much more than just the mammals that occupy the area. Because wildlife are far less destructive and demanding on the land, many other smaller insects forms and birds also thrive. Also game meat is higher in protein and lower in fat, and free of hormones and antibiotics. Internal and external paracides are also harmful to insects and also birds. Ox-peckers for example suffer as a result. Wildlife farmers are also more tolerant of predators.

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@@Tom Kellie to me its a more about a better land utilisation option. There is so much more than just the mammals that occupy the area. Because wildlife are far less destructive and demanding on the land, many other smaller insects forms and birds also thrive. Also game meat is higher in protein and lower in fat, and free of hormones and antibiotics. Internal and external paracides are also harmful to insects and also birds. Ox-peckers for example suffer as a result. Wildlife farmers are also more tolerant of predators.

 

~ @@Bugs

 

I hope that you won't mind if I quote you verbatim in classes this week.

If so, let me know and I won't do so.

What you've explained above is to the point, insightful and what needs to be heard here.

I'm chagrined to tell you that I'd never read anything like this before, nor had I thought of it.

After visiting your nation, last week, I'm far more open to what you've explained.

My students aren't likely to be as fortunate as I've been, so I'll explain the wildlife vs livestock issue, giving full credit to your elegant explanation.

A hearty thanks!

BTW: I've decided tonight to return to South Africa for another safari in late January, 2016.

Tom K.

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There are few meals that I have enjoyed in my life that would top a couple of good grilled warthog steaks served with mashed potato and a good gravy with corn on the cob and some steamed veges on the side... Add to that a good wine, the ambiance of a thatched open sided dining area, lit by a couple of paraffin lamps and a welcoming post dinner fire flickering in the darkness outside. Heaven :)

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There are few meals that I have enjoyed in my life that would top a couple of good grilled warthog steaks served with mashed potato and a good gravy with corn on the cob and some steamed veges on the side... Add to that a good wine, the ambiance of a thatched open sided dining area, lit by a couple of paraffin lamps and a welcoming post dinner fire flickering in the darkness outside. Heaven :)

 

~ @@ZaminOz

 

Thou persuadest me through describing such fine fare!

Funny how slowly accumulating safari experience and regular reading of varied Safaritalk posts modifies my outlook.

What you've eloquently described above is vivid in my mind's eye.

I'd never thought of eating wildlife, but am slowly shifting.

Thanks!

Tom K.

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There are few meals that I have enjoyed in my life that would top a couple of good grilled warthog steaks served with mashed potato and a good gravy with corn on the cob and some steamed veges on the side... Add to that a good wine, the ambiance of a thatched open sided dining area, lit by a couple of paraffin lamps and a welcoming post dinner fire flickering in the darkness outside. Heaven :)

 

Heaven is a bit of an under statement my mouth is watering at the thought.

 

Personally I have no objections to eating any kind of meat so long as it's time on the planet was good and healthy and it's end quick and clean. Whether it's cattle, sheep, or something more unusual to my western pallet like warthog etc it's still the end for that individual. As a species it must of course be sustainable and not damage it's ecosystem but the thought eating wild meat doesn't bother me in the least.

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I want to go one step further and state that in my opinion, anybody who follows a vegetarian diet in the belief that it benefits conversion is fooling themselves.

 

I say this for very much the same reasons that farming with game is better for the environment than cattle are.

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