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Eating wildlife you see on Safari

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Have you ever eaten game whilst on Safari?

 

Why?

 

How did you feel about eating the animals you had come to see?

 

Kruger Park sells a number of game meat products in it shops, from biltong to fresh meat for the braai, and I just wondered what the uptake of it is? Obviously in a managed fenced ecosystem such as Kruger it is sustainable and there is a need for population control. (What percentage of the income from its sale goes back into conservation?) However, I wouldn't be able, having perhaps been on a drive and been excited to see a herd of Kudu, then to come back to camp and cook kudu to eat. What about you?

 

This isn't a vegetarian asking the question, BTW. Just be interested to hear members opinions.

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I do not have a problem.

Living in a rural area we have a farm near by which is a tourist attraction open to the public as well as a number of local farms have a "Lambs open day" where the public can come & interact with the ewes & lambs & bottle feed the orphans. Soon these animals will head for the slaughter house.

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While in Kruger we did buy steaks (impala, kudu) for the bbq/braai. It was with mixed feelings. On the one side, these animals have had a far better life than any cow in the bio-industry could possible have had. And their meat is much better and healthier. So it is really very much more eco friendly than anything you can normally buy in the supermarket. On the other side, it is a bit sad to look at these animals and then eat them. Also I do not agree that culling is really the best and most effective control measure for a park like Kruger. I think it is more of a dogma that has been carved into stone there.....

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I've had 'game' meat on a couple of occasions in Africa, and didn't really enjoy it....not because it wasn't good, but because those who prepared it weren't good cooks! I'm not a fussy eater, so I ate everything except on one occasion which I seem to have mentioned ad nauseum on various forums: we had eland as tough as old boots at Zibalianja in Botswana, and it was the first time I left anything on my plate on safari. Ever! Fair dinkum, I know how to tenderise tough meat better than that cook did!

 

I've eaten at the Carnivore in Nairobi (is it still called that?) and found the experience nothing special. I don't like eating kangaroo in Australia, mainly because the flavour doesn't do anything for me, but I suspect I also have a bit of a prejudice against eating one of our faunal symbols. But I'm not against killing any animals for food (we are naturally omnivorous after all).

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I have absolutely no problem in eating game animals just as I do eat "domesticated" animals provided I feel confident that the animals were either bred for meat or were legally taken from wilderness areas where it was necessary to reduce the population.

 

I will not eat game animals if I have any reason to suspect that they were hunted illegally or that they are too endangered a species to lose any to the table.

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No problem for me. Should I become vegetarian because I see cattle on my daily way to work?

 

And I love biltong. gallery_3403_44_1281.gif

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Yep. impala keebabs, kudu and a few others. Admitedly my favourite is crocodile but I haven't eaten in Africa.

 

Geoff.

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My philosophy is I won't eat what I shoot (photograph). And back in 2000, ushering in the new millenium, I gave up eating red meat, for the most part, figuring if I talk the talk I might as well walk the walk. B)

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I have eaten Ostritch on safari ...... i may have eaten omellette made from Ostritch egg also.

 

I haven't eaten the exotic antelopes - but, then again i don't eat beef

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I've had Kudu, Eland, Springbok, Warthog and Oryx when on holiday, all of which were very nice when prepared by a chef that knows what they are doing. The antelopes are very lean so if not cooked right could easily become dry and tough, but if cooked right they are lovely.

The animals came from game farms so I see no difference between that and eating beef, pork, lamb etc.

 

On one holiday I did seem to be a curse to any animal I photgraphed. I photo'd a young zebra one afternoon that had lost the herd, and by next morning when I saw it next the lions were just finishing the last few bits. The next day I watched a warthog lying in the hot sun - an hour later I went back and it was down to the last few mouthfuls for some hungry lions - I think they must have been following my car and eating anything I took a photo of B);)

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Personally I would not buy game meat and like gorilla girl, I would not eat what I photograph but in Africa you just don't know what you get especially when you order "beef" and you never really see that many cows...

 

Ross

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you just don't know what you get especially when you order "beef" and you never really see that many cows...

Well, assuming you're mostly there to see wildlife, and therefore are in game parks/ reserves, you're not likely to see much cattle... which is a good thing! But some countries, such as Bots, produce a LOT of beef, I believe. And yes, it's from cows! :)

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I admire gorilla girls stance. Many people eat meat, yet they are not prepared to chop a chickens head off to do so. As long as you have distanced yourself from that act of killing, then you are comfortable to eat meat.

 

The issue of game meat brings about the question of hygiene and animal rights. It’s not possible to herd wild animals into a truck and transport them to the nearest abattoir. Wild animals have to be shot while they are in the bush. Any game meat that is sold, should be processed in a licensed facility even though they are slaughtered in the wild.

 

All meat needs to be stamped, but the stamp only sticks to the fat and game meat has no fat so it cannot be stamped. It is well known that game meat is better for you than any other meat. It is very low in fat and high in protein. The problem is it is difficult and time consuming to prepare.

 

To cut a long story short, by eating game, you are doing something for the environment. No genetic modification, no insecticides, no hormones, no herbicides, encouraging reclamation of natural habitat etc.

 

Next time you drive past a farm and see a cow think of a burger or a succulent steak. But its better not to think about those things, because being a vegetarian is just too much trouble and I like meat.

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Vegetarian?....Hmmmmm!

 

Every vegetarian I have met, & I admit not many, have become vegetarian for animal rights reasons!

Yet continue to use animal products, leather, milk, cheese, butter, products with gelatin & the such!

 

IMOH

If it is for animal rights that a vegetarian becomes a vegetarian then they should be Vegan but that is a difficult belief to follow & one that I greatly admire.

 

If a person has a vegetarian diet because they believe meat is not tasty or not good for them then that is their choice & I would back their wishes all the way.

 

We eat animals, we are predators but that does not give us the right to inflict cruelty on them.

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Speaking of cruelty, if any of you have seen or get the chance to see the movie "Fast Food Nation", it's an eye-opener on what goes on behind the scenes of a beef processing plant.

 

It does make you think twice about eating game meat vs. cows/beef as dik-dik mentioned.

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"Hoteliers push for lifting of game meat sale and import ban" reports www.businessdailyafrica.com.

Licensed game meat sellers in Kenya are rethinking their business models following a continued sales ban and refusal by the government to allow imports from South Africa.

 

A restaurant such as the Carnivore which has been selling game meat since the early 1980s has now become more of an events-hosting entertainment facility rather than a game meat haven it has been known for.

 

Sale of any game meat was banned in Kenya in 2004 because of concerns over poaching, forcing game meat outlets to restrict themselves to selling crocodile and ostrich meat whose sale remains open.

To read the full article click here.

 

Do you think such a lifting of a ban, whether it be for imports from SA or allowing commercial bushmeat from in country to be sold could and would add to the illegal bushmeat trade? Are restaurants such as The Carnivore a hang over from the past, or do safari goers to Kenya still visit it in the hope of sampling game meat? Have you been there? And how does Kenya compare to South Africa, where a large amount of game meat is consumed?

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Do you think such a lifting of a ban, whether it be for imports from SA or allowing commercial bushmeat from in country to be sold could and would add to the illegal bushmeat trade? Are restaurants such as The Carnivore a hang over from the past, or do safari goers to Kenya still visit it in the hope of sampling game meat? Have you been there? And how does Kenya compare to South Africa, where a large amount of game meat is consumed?

 

I think given the levels of poaching and particularly corruption then opening up a legal market for game meat will make it easier for commercial poachers to sell their illegal game meat. Its basically impossible to tell if an impala steak is legal or not, so any corrupt person in the supply chain can introduce illegal meat easily.

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Ask yourselves this:

 

What makes more ecological sense:

 

(1) raising and eating herds of non-native domesticated animals that usually demand more of the environment than it can offer, or

(2) raising, in less abundance, and then eating native antelope that can be pretty much left alone to fend for themselves until it's time to become lunch.

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Ask yourselves this:

 

What makes more ecological sense:

 

(1) raising and eating herds of non-native domesticated animals that usually demand more of the environment than it can offer, or

(2) raising, in less abundance, and then eating native antelope that can be pretty much left alone to fend for themselves until it's time to become lunch.

 

 

Turning vegetarian?

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Turning vegetarian?

Never!

 

I'm a firm believer that my number (2) makes far more sense than (1), and therefore I have no qualms about eating the occasional tasty kudu or gemsbok.

 

Being a vegetarian obviously makes even more ecological sense, but I'm not going there.

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I'd rather see some of the abundant game in the Masai Mara hunted for food and eliminate some of those very destructive cattle herds - but try convincing the Masai!

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Ellie, I'm glad you don't have a say in the Mara.

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I prefer not to, just as I prefer not eating cows and pigs over here. Good question that would likely arise at least once during most safaris when kudu or ostrich makes its way onto the menu. I did find it odd when I shared a vehicle with people who commented on our various sightings with the quality of the flesh the creature possessed.

 

Consuming a local antelope or bird may leave a smaller carbon footprint than a hamburger.

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Turning vegetarian?

 

Being a vegetarian obviously makes even more ecological sense, but I'm not going there.

 

I disagree. Growing vegetables makes less ecological sense than 1 and 2.

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Posted (edited)

Turning vegetarian?

 

Being a vegetarian obviously makes even more ecological sense, but I'm not going there.

 

I disagree. Growing vegetables makes less ecological sense than 1 and 2.

 

 

 

 

Really? I thought cattle rearing was the worst in terms of carbon footprint?

 

I think for certain blood types or ethnicities, their bodies don't digest protein very efficiently and it ultimately, leads to a host of diseases including cancers.

Edited by madaboutcheetah

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