Game Warden

Private or group safari - your preference.

   65 members have voted

  1. 1. Please choose from the below options:

    • Private
      56
    • Group
      4
    • Not bothered
      5

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103 posts in this topic

Hi Sangeeta,very, as a matter of fact ,as I would love nothing more than to help other ST members do what I (we) love best, at the best possile price.

 

You do realise we all have to pitch our own tents and chip in with cooking etc :P ,but I do have a helper ( KG ) is his name. who helps as well ,he does the dishes ,fire, cleans around the camp,makes sure rubbish is burnt or discarded .

 

I would suggest that,depends on how many of us there are ,we hire an extra 4x4 or two from Brenda at Maun self drive,this way ST members can fly direct to Maun ,I will be there to meet you all ,and then proceed from there.It is a long and painfull drive from JHB to Maun,roughly 1400km.

 

If Jochin joins us, he would need his own 4x4 :D :D .We ,Jochin and I have permission from the warden at Poha gate Chobe, to camp at a few pvt camp sites they have in and around Nogaatsha area and other areas,these are not open to the general public.So closer to the time or when ever you want,we could work out a route that all those that want to participate can dicuss here on ST and see if we can come up with a route we can all relate to.

 

Sure you could get one or more ST members to join you on the canoe trip.

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I would imagine then that given we will need to set up camps etc that spending seveal nights in just a few camps would be a good idea to maximise the time we can spend on the game viewing. But this is straying away from the subject of this topic so I'd suggest we start a separate thread on this. :)

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Yes, Andre, do please start up a new topic for this adventure: sure Dikdik will join in when he gets chance.

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Okay will do,sorry we got a bit carried away.

 

I think I scared dikdik away. :P

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No, Jochen's snoring did that...

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I think he's off in the congo somewhere..

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Thanks Kittykat ,will start new thread,hopefully he will pick it up. :D

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I think I scared dikdik away. :P

 

They are shy, elusive creatures.

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Just has to be private for me. Private and self drive.

 

The time I am able to spend in the African bush is limited and precious.

 

It may sound selfish, but I want to do what I choose all the time.

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Private for the same reasons @@Whyone? outlines. No self drive though.

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lol. bit worried now really only a learner at this safaris thing we have done 3 (Total 42+days getting longer each time we go ) but all with hubby and my mum and dad then as well our teenage boys came 1 year .so just us doing our thing with the same driver .

now

Going to south africa and all the lodges are quite small but we are sharing a vehicle from each lodge .

what's the etiquette in a shared van, what if they like taking pictures of flowers or every bird we see, what if they have young children ,what if they want to go back for breakfast instead of following the leopard tracks .can we still shout out if we see a rock lion slumbering in the sun ,

Maybe i will win the lottery before we go so i can have my own van .

And i apologise in advance if anybody is in our van when we get there. :rolleyes:

julie.x

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It depends ...

If you are happy with the group people nothing is better than that ..on my trip to ngorongoro there were few people in the car ...all the time they tried to persue the driver to watch leopards ... in ngorongoro we have leopards few in number in lerai forest ...we searched alot for them in day time..during the 5 hour trip 2 hours were spend on that ..due to which we lost the chance to see other animals..so if the geoup people are adjusting and sensible no issue... if u have strong taste for watching some particular wild animal ..must go for private luxurious safari...

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..... if u have strong taste for watching some particular wild animal ..must go for private luxurious safari...

 

Not necessarily.

 

You can go to the other end of the scale and self drive - that way you can spend as long as you wish looking for, and watching, whatever you like without feeling any pressure whatsoever to compromise to other guests wishes.

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Self drive & private lodge vehicles are the only way to go w/ specialized interests ( photog and only certain species ) and quiet vehicle. worth every penny.

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This is an extremely interesting as well as pertinent discussion for me. As "Private and customized" is our niche.

I would like to hear an little more definition on what "private" is to you.

We do not buy blocks of time to fill with groups and transportation between locations is a private vehicle with personal driver. If you want to deviate on your

itinerary and accommodations allow, feel free, as you are not interfering with anyone else's trip.

With this being said, most of the lodges we utilize accommodate twelve to sixteen people so their may be another family or group dining with you

or joining you for game drives. Private game drives can be arranged for a relatively small additional fee and we often do so. Reserving an entire camp, which

we have done, is costly. Would you consider the above "private" or group?

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~ Either type of safari is fine for me.



My first safari was a 3 day/2 night joining safari in Masai Mara, yet it was a delight from start to finish.



The subsequent seven safaris have all been private safaris with one guide and one van, stating in lodges and tents according to circumstances.



If the only available option was another joining safari I'd gladly take it.



What I love most is simply the joy of being on safari.



There's no imperative for me to control anything, as I fully trust my guide.



I'm there to savor life.



Safaris are a gift for which I'm ever so grateful.



Thus private or group would be fine with me.



Tom K.


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~ Based on the safari in Masai Mara, earlier this month, there is a time when a group safari might appeal to me.



I spoke with a large group from India — two extended families traveling together — about their experience.



Oddly, they'd observed no lions during a day when Anthony and I photographed 21 lions.



Their children were well-behaved, polite, and full of enthusiasm for the safari experience, jumping with joy to see a Vervet monkey raiding the dining room.



Being with a group of younger family members on their first safari might be a deeply fulfilling experience.



True enough, I wouldn't expect optimal photography conditions, but their energy and happiness in the bush would be a joy in and of itself.



I've written elsewhere in Safaritalk that I especially admire those who bring children on safari of an age who might appreciate the experience.



Tom K.


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For those looking for the quiet and peaceful time out in the African bush, then private is the way to go. Its is quit costly but it can be made possible and would depend on a few things:

 

1. The accommodation choices - You can compromise and not go for the extremely high end camps/lodges and cut back on the cost of accommodation. While that might mean being in a camp with people you don't know, I look at it as an opportunity to mingle with other travellers which can also be interesting.

 

2. Type of vehicles used - In Kenya you have two options, you either do a 4x4 land cruiser or land rover safari, or go for the mini - van safari. The land cruiser being the expensive one, the van being the cheaper option. So depending on the season, if you are sure you won't get stuck in the mud somewhere in the bush or breakdown after a few kilometres in a horribly corrugated road, then a mini - van safari might be the way to go if the aim is to have a private safari with a vehicle for your private use

 

3. Number of days spent out on the bush - It is possible to make a shorter trip a private one as obviously less days could mean less money spent.

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For those looking for the quiet and peaceful time out in the African bush, then private is the way to go. Its is quit costly but it can be made possible and would depend on a few things:

 

1. The accommodation choices - You can compromise and not go for the extremely high end camps/lodges and cut back on the cost of accommodation. While that might mean being in a camp with people you don't know, I look at it as an opportunity to mingle with other travellers which can also be interesting.

 

2. Type of vehicles used - In Kenya you have two options, you either do a 4x4 land cruiser or land rover safari, or go for the mini - van safari. The land cruiser being the expensive one, the van being the cheaper option. So depending on the season, if you are sure you won't get stuck in the mud somewhere in the bush or breakdown after a few kilometres in a horribly corrugated road, then a mini - van safari might be the way to go if the aim is to have a private safari with a vehicle for your private use

 

3. Number of days spent out on the bush - It is possible to make a shorter trip a private one as obviously less days could mean less money spent.

 

~ @@Ndaro Teddy

 

This is what I've done, which has resulted in highly satisfactory safaris.

BTW: I'm continuing to mull over in my mind what you wrote about Shimba Hills.

Tom K.

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@@Tom Kellie

 

It really depends on your tour operator/agent. Some people are not so lucky because they never get someone to advise them on their safaris and itineraries. This applies to safari greehorns who have little or no experience in planning for their safaris. I am glad to hear that there is someone who is really looking after you well while in my country Tom. This is what the industry need so as to built trust and a good reputation for the industry in Kenya.

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~ Based on the safari in Masai Mara, earlier this month, there is a time when a group safari might appeal to me.

I spoke with a large group from India — two extended families traveling together — about their experience.

Oddly, they'd observed no lions during a day when Anthony and I photographed 21 lions.

Their children were well-behaved, polite, and full of enthusiasm for the safari experience, jumping with joy to see a Vervet monkey raiding the dining room.

Being with a group of younger family members on their first safari might be a deeply fulfilling experience.

True enough, I wouldn't expect optimal photography conditions, but their energy and happiness in the bush would be a joy in and of itself.

I've written elsewhere in Safaritalk that I especially admire those who bring children on safari of an age who might appreciate the experience.

Tom K.

 

 

@@Tom Kellie travelling on safari with children is a blast - they see everything from such a different perspective - make sure you arm them with a camera so you can see the things that they see.

http://www.wildlifephotographyafrica.com/kids-on-safari-get-them-involved/

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@@Tom Kellie

 

It really depends on your tour operator/agent. Some people are not so lucky because they never get someone to advise them on their safaris and itineraries. This applies to safari greehorns who have little or no experience in planning for their safaris. I am glad to hear that there is someone who is really looking after you well while in my country Tom. This is what the industry need so as to built trust and a good reputation for the industry in Kenya.

 

~ @@Ndaro Teddy

 

I've been richly blessed with a series of positive experiences during all eight Kenya safaris.

No complaints whatsoever.

I admire your sincere concern for the reputation of your country with regard to safari visitors.

Tom K.

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@@Tom Kellie travelling on safari with children is a blast - they see everything from such a different perspective - make sure you arm them with a camera so you can see the things that they see.

http://www.wildlifephotographyafrica.com/kids-on-safari-get-them-involved/

 

~ @@Soukous

 

What you've written above is delightful! While reading through Safaritalk, I've found myself frequently wondering: ‘What about kids?’, as their unique perspective is precious.

If I may say so, you bring to Safaritalk substantial on-the-ground practical experience with all manner of safaris, not to mention the recent Primitive Trail.

Yet from that rich store of experience, you emphasize the delights of children on safari, that's a powerful endorsement, in my book.

What you pointed out above — the importance of equipping children with cameras — is a factor that I hadn't considered.

Their vantage and ours are different, not only as to height, but as to values and perceptions.

I really like what you've explained.

Thank you.

Tom K.

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too kind @@Tom Kellie

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@@Tom Kellie

 

Thanks Tom. The country and the industry needs to build on this and Kenya needs to know that travellers expect the very highest standard of services when it comes to handling visitors and there is a lot of room for improvement.

 

@@Soukous

 

I agree with both you all the others about children on safari. I have had lots of experience with families travelling with children on safaris, and I love just how happy and excited they all are when they see the wildlife. One girl in particular from Poland, about 8 years old, was exceptional with her knowledge of birds. I agree that equiping them with a camera would be a great way to see through their photos how their viewed the whole experience. I will try to suggest it to my clients in the future. Great idea.

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