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Game Warden

The 25 dollar donation - does it make a difference?

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I wonder just what 25 dollars gets you these days? For instance a night out at the cinema for two including a big box of popcorn and a drink each... does that sound about right? Not that I have a lot of time to get to the cinema nowadays so somebody correct me if I'm wrong. (At least the last film I saw was Africa based, The Blood Diamond with Leonardo di Caprio and Djimon Hounsou).

 

Does that night out really make a difference to your life? Will you look back in perhaps a year's time and think - that was money well spent? I doubt it - and that amount of money you will barely miss. Yet imagine a different scenario where those 25 dollars do make a difference and help to bring a change in Africa. To someone's life, the welfare of a distressed animal, the removal of a snare or a game warden's lunch parcel high up in the Virunga National Park. Imagine if those 25 dollars help educate a child in the importance of wildlife and habitat conservation and that child grows up to be an acclaimed conservationist - instead of a poacher who only places importance on the value of an ivory tusk or leopard's skin. Imagine for a moment that money helping to feed an orphaned baby animal which in a few years might be released back into the wild and breeds successfully.

 

It's not a fantasy: 25 dollars does make a difference and by donating this amount you will be able to look back in hindsight and think it money well spent. Especially if you can see for yourself exactly how that money was utilised. The purpose of this article over the coming months will be to examine how such a small amount can help, can make a change: consider the prospect of ten people making such a similar donation, twenty, thirty. You won't miss 25 dollars, and nor will the next person who decides to donate: on it's own that small amount does make a difference - think of how big that difference will be if more people do the same. I'll be including information from the different groups featured in Safaritalk and talking with their directors to see why those 25 dollars do make a difference and then you can see for yourself just what an important contribution it is.

 

So I've done it, started off - donating 50 UK pounds to the Chipembele Wildlife Education Trust in Zambia, (www.chipembele.org) and in another article will be following the money from the initial online donation to how it is spent on the ground by Anna and Steve Tolan in the Luangwa Valley.

 

But for now, let's meet some people involved on the ground in Africa and see what 25 dollars means to them.

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Anna Tolan is a trust director of The Chipembele Wildlife Education Centre in Zambia.

25 dollars. Here's what Anna Tolan would spend that amount on:

 

Just to give you an idea of how far $25 would go, it could pay for:

  • A pair of good leather school shoes for a school going child
  • A full set of uniform for a secondary pupil
  • School fees for a secondary pupil for 1 year
  • 2 x 25 kg bags of mealie meal (the staple diet) enough to feed a family of six for a month
  • 2 good quality blankets (most children don't have one and sleep on a mat on the floor)
  • 4 mosquito nets to help prevent malaria

Best wishes

 

Anna Tolan - www.chipembele.org

 

To see further examples of what a donation to Chipembele will buy click here. This takes you to the donations page of www.chipembele.org and by clicking this link you have not made any commitment to donate.

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Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick is head of The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust based in Nairobi.

25 dollars. Here's what Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick would spend that amount on:

 

Below is a short list of what US$25 could pay for

  • 2 tins SMA Goldcap
  • some medicinal Essential Oils
  • Some Veterinary drugs for stomach bacterial infections
  • 2 blankets
  • Some oatmeal porridge or dessicated coconut - all used daily on the infant Elephants in the Nairobi Nursery

Best wishes

 

Dame Daphne Sheldrick - www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org

 

To see how you can make a donation to The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust click here. This takes you to the donations page of www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org and by clicking this link you have not made any commitment to donate.

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Louise Joubert is the founder trustee of the SanWild Wildlife Trust in Limpopo Province, South Africa.

 

SanWild is the only known charity that have taken on the innocent victims of the sordid canned lion hunting industry in South Africa themselves. They have construced a large predator holding sanctuary where lions are kept until safe foster homes can be found for them; either to be returned to the wild or to live out their lives in large holding camps ranging from 300 – 500 hectares in size. Presently the Trust takes care of and supports 21 lions.

 

Here's how a $25.00 donation can help the SanWild lions.

 

Just to give you an idea of how far $25 would go, it could:

  • Feed an adult lion for a day.
  • Feed two sub-adult cubs for a day

Kind regards

 

Louise Joubert - www.sanwild.org

 

To see how you can make a donation to The SanWild Wildlife Trust click here. This takes you to the Afritrust donations page and by clicking this link you have not made any commitment to donate.

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Dr. Laurie Marker is Co-Founder and Executive Director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) based in Namibia and in 2000 was recognised as one of Time Magazine's Heroes for the Planet.

 

Here is how a $25 donation could help the Cheetah Conservation Fund.

  • Feed two cheetahs for a day
  • Feed one dog for 2.5 weeks
  • Feed and house four school students at CCF camp for 1 day
  • Cover one day of training 1.5 farmers
  • Buy 2 blankets for the Clinic
  • Provide some medications for domestic and wild animals housed at CCF
  • Retread two tires for CCF vehicles

Best regards,

 

Laurie Marker - www.cheetah.org

 

To see how you can make a donation to The Cheetah Conservation Fund click here. This takes you to the donations page of www.cheetah.org and by clicking this link you have not made any commitment to donate.

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Paul Hart is Director of the Drakenstein Lion Park near Cape Town.

 

Here’s what 25 dollars could do for our animals:

  • Pay for the care costs of one of our rescued lions for 5 days. This includes food, veterinary and housing costs.
  • Pay the wages of one of our animal care givers for one week.
  • Pay for 1.5 meters of new fencing.
  • Contribute towards the rescue costs involved in rehoming an abused lion to our sanctuary.

Best Regards

 

Paul Hart www.lionrescue.org.za

 

To see how you can make a donation to The Drakenstein Lion Park click here. This takes you to the donations page of www.lionrescue.org.za and by clicking this link you have not made any commitment to donate.

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Will Snell is founder of Harambee Schools Kenya.

 

Here's how $25 could benefit HSK:

  • Buy enough textbooks to teach one subject to 10 children
  • Provide a free school lunch for one child for four months

Take care,

 

Will Snell www.hsk.org.uk

 

To see how you can make a donation to Harambee Schools Kenya click here. This takes you to the donations page of www.hsk.org.uk and by clicking this link you have not made any commitment to donate.

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Michele and Ian Merrifield founded and are directors of The Daktari Bush School and Wildlife Orphanage, based in the Limpopo Province, South Africa.

 

With us, $25 could:

  • feed and accommodate one child at the orphanage for five days
  • pay for the fuel for the vehicle to collect six under-privileged children from their school (65Km away = 130Km round trip) on a Monday and return them to their village on the Friday(also 130Km round trip)
  • feed six dwarf ostriches for one month
  • feed one caracal and one serval for one month
  • feed two blind duiker for six months
  • feed one blind impala for three months
  • buy two solar powered garden lamps to light the pathways
  • buy one solar powered motion detector spotlight for the waterhole or entrances to chalets
  • buy one solar powered (8 x LED) , pull string, light for a chalet

Regards,

 

Ian and Michele Merrifield, www.daktaribushschool.org

 

To see how you can make a donation to The Daktari Bush School and Wildlife Orphanage click here. This takes you to the donations page of www.africanorphanage.com and by clicking this link you have not made any commitment to donate.

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Albert Schenk has been the field manager in Thuma Forest Reserve for the Wildlife Action Group since 2005.

 

With 25 US$ W.A.G. can:

  • pay 2 weeks salary for a scout; that is 2 weeks straight protection of wildlife in the field.
  • buy 1 pair trousers and 1 shirt (= 1 uniform) for a scout.
  • organize a conservation awareness day in one of the communities around Thuma F.R..
  • employ a group of villagers from one community to do one or two days piece work in Thuma F.R., like for example road maintenance.

Indeed 25US$ can already make a significant difference!

 

Keep in touch,

 

Albert Schenk www.wag-malawi.org

 

To see how you can support The Wildlife Action Group, Malawi click here. This takes you to the Wildlife Action Support Group Europe's (www.wildlife-malawi.org) donation page and by taking this action you will not have made any commitment to donating.

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Luca Belpietro runs an eco-tourism lodge, Campi ya Kanzi in Kenya in association with the Maasai and the Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust which seeks to promote the well being of the Maasai community and to protect the wildlife and habitat essential to the survival of the animals and the Maasai.

 

$25 with us will:

  • buy a desk for 2, with bench, for primary school
  • pay 1 week salary of a game scout, protecting lions, wildlife, desnaring, etc.
  • pay 1 week salary to a kindergarten nurse

Ciao

Luca www.maasaitrust.org

 

To see how you can support the Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust click here. This takes you to the Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust's donation page and by taking this action you will not have made any commitment to donating.

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Rebecca Klein is project coordinator of Cheetah Conservation Botswana: CCB is a long term conservation program incorporating research, community outreach and education. One of the projects focuses is on reducing cheetah / livestock conflict and improving the attitudes of the farming community and their methods of predator control. Ultimately, supporting the survival of free ranging cheetah, the habitat on which it depends and ensuring the spirit of the Kalahari remains for future generations.

 

With CCB 25$ can:

  • pay for a medical check and anaesthesia for 1 adult cheetah.
  • feed an orphaned cheetah for 1 week.
  • sponsor 2 farmers to attend a Living with Predators workshop.
  • provide 10 predator educational booklets to schools.
  • print 20 awareness raising posters.
  • pay a local volunteer to train and work with CCB for 1 week.
  • run a CCB project vehicle for 1 week to carry out essential community outreach activities.

Thanks! Rebecca www.cheetahbotswana.com

 

To see how you can help Cheetah Conservation Botswana click here. This takes you to Cheetah Conservation Botswana's donation page and by taking this action you will not have made any commitment to donating.

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Johnny Rodrigues is Chairman of the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force. The Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force (ZCTF) was formed in April 2001 by a group of Zimbabweans, who were desperately concerned about the unacceptable levels of poaching as well as the destruction of the environment due to the break down of law and order in Zimbabwe.

 

He writes:

 

With regard to the things we could do with USD25:

  • It would pay for fuel to pump water into one pan in Hwange for a whole day
  • It would buy 5kg of glucose for Tatenda, lasting him a week
  • It would buy 1,5 litres of vitamin syrup for Tatenda lasting him 2 weeks
  • It would pay a month's salary for a rhino guard or a pump attendant in Hwange

Thanks a million for everything you're doing. I really appreciate it.

 

Best wishes, Johnny Rodrigues.

 

The Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force can be found on Facebook here:

 

www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=15148470211

 

Where banking and donation details are listed.

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Cathy Dean has been Director of Save the Rhino International since 2001. Save the Rhino supports rhino- and community-based conservation projects in Africa and Asia.

 

US $25 can go a long way:

  • 1 sleeping bag for a game scout, so that they can stay out on overnight patrols
  • 2 inflatable mattresses to give to rangers to ensure a good night's sleep!
  • 3 mosquito nets for members of the Rhino Protection Units in Indonesia, who work in malarial forests
  • 12 boxes of pencils for schools taking part in an environmental education programme
  • 20 days' rations for a bloodhound, who can follow a poacher's scent for up to 36 hours

Hope one or two of these are different enough to be appealing!

 

Best, Cathy Dean www.savetherhino.org

 

To see how you can help Save the Rhino International click here. This takes you to Save the Rhino International's donation page and by taking this action you will not have made any commitment to donating.

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Excellent, this is one of the most positive posts I have had the pleasure to read on all the "Eco Safari" sites.

 

Well done to Game Warden for the work put into this.

 

Next time you have $25 dollars burning a hole in your pocket now you know the good it could do.

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Anthony May is a Trustee of the charity Predator Conservation Trust

 

Here's how we could use 25 US dollars:

  • Anti Poaching Unit scouts wage for one week.
  • A pair of boots for Anti Poaching Unit scout.
  • A months food rations for Anti Poaching Unit.
  • One weeks supply of food for 4 dogs at the Painted Dog Project rehabilitation facility
  • One weeks salary of Painted Dog Project rehabilitation facility staff member.
  • Cost of one child attending Painted Dog ProjectChildren’s Bush Camp.
  • One days fuel for tracking Wild Dogs.
  • 1 small hyena bait (goat or sheep)
  • 5 tranquilizer darts (2ml)
  • 100 charges for tranquiliser dart gun
  • 2 tyre repairs
  • 5 visual ID collars for spotted hyenas

Thanks and take care, Anthony May www.predatorconservation.com

 

To see how you can make a donation to The Predator Conseravtion Trust click here. This takes you to the donations page of www.predatorconservation.com and by clicking this link you have not made any commitment to donate.

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When you see this thread, you realise what a diverse range of deserving enterprises there is (and ask yourself how many others there might be), and how difficult it is to decide which to put at the top of your personal list.

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Rachel McRobb is the CEO of the South Luangwa Conservation Society (SLCS).

 

25 dollars? Here's what Rachel McRobb would spend that amount on:

 

  • 2 x 25kg's bags of mealie meal (one bag would be enough for 6 scouts on a 10 day patrol)
  • A pair of rain boots for a scout for rainy season patrols
  • a set of rations for a 10 days long patrol (including cooking oil, salt, sugar, relish, tea)
  • cover the bonus for a scout who managed to apprehend a poacher
  • Reward for an informer who turned in a muzzle loading gun
  • cost of fuel to drop off a patrol
  • sleeping bag for a scout on patrol
  • first aid kit for two long patrols

 

with thanks,

Rachel McRobb - www.slcs-zambia.org

 

____________________________________

 

You can make a $25 donation now.

 

Donations are made via UK based *The U foundation who have kindly partnered with SLCS for the purposes of donations

 

2) Make donation via Just Giving UK - U Foundation page here: www.justgiving.com/Ufoundation

 

3) Send an email to slcs@iwayafrica.com and info@theufoundation.org include the JustGiving receipt number and state you have made an SLCS donation for The Safaritalk $25.00 Appeal.

 

____________________________________

 

*Click here to read more about the U Foundation

 

Image used with permission Rachel McRobb

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Jason Turner is a Lion Ecologist & Scientific Advisor for the Global White Lion Protection Trust (WLT) operating in the greater Timbavati bush region of South Africa. To find out more about the Trust visit their website here: www.whitelions.org.

 

“Days of Freedom Program”

 

Your donation will contribute* towards a ‘Day of Freedom’ for a white lion in their natural endemic habitat:

 

Scientific Research

Radio-tracking collars and telemetry equipment ensure that the reintroduced lions can be monitored at all times for scientific and safety reasons.

 

Anti-poaching & Security

Anti-poaching teams patrol the boundary fences daily, checking for snares and repairing fence-lines when necessary.

 

Reintroduction Program

The scientific research team and monitoring vehicles are vital for the program to reintroduce white lions to their natural endemic habitat.

 

Lion Predation

Shattering all misperceptions the white lion pride is hunting at a mean rate of a kill every 2,5 days. The prey base in the primary reintroduction area therefore needs to be supplemented at times.

 

Habitat & Wildlife Management

Fundamental to conserving the white lion is protecting their prey, and therefore the habitat of that prey. This includes alien plant control, bush-thinning and erosion control programs.

 

Veterinary Care

The WLT uses specialist wildlife veterinarians when immobilizing the lions for immunization, translocation, radio-collaring and contraception.

 

To see how you can help the Global White Lion Protection Trust (WLT) click here. This takes you to the Global White Lion Protection Trust (WLT)'s donation page and by taking this action you will not have made any commitment to donating.

 

* A ‘Day of Freedom’ for a white lion costs the Global White Lion Trust: $45

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Lindy Wafula, 3rd from left.

Lindy is founder and director of Project Africa which supports social and economic empowerment for women and girls living in rural Africa through education and training, health care, and provision of resources needed for enterprise development. To find out more please visit their website here: www.projectforafrica.org

 

I wish to share with you what USD 25 can do for the work of Project Africa.

  • can buy up to 20 postage stamps for the Rafiki Program Letters.
  • can Buy 500 envelopes
  • can buy 1000 writing letter heads
  • can buy 50 note books
  • can buy 200 pens
  • can pay travel allowance for one adult education teacher for one month ( 4 sessions)
  • can pay classroom rent for one week

Look forward to speaking soon, Lindy.

 

To see how you can make a donation to Project Africa click here. This takes you to the donations page of www.projectforafrica.org (via www.paypal.com) and by clicking this link you have not made any commitment to donate.

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Call me old fashioned, but any amount helps these days. While 25 bucks may only be enough to buy a couple shamwows, it's better than nothing.

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Welcome to safaritalk, Savenature. I've never seen currency converted to Shamwows. :rolleyes:

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We at NWHS assist numerous conservation field organizations in Africa, Ecuador and currently expanding into India (more to come on that soon). We actively promote our allies and their wildlife and habitat efforts, along with providing a means to donate for most of them (all but one). We continue to add and assist field organizations who are in direct contact with wildlife and wildlife habitat (including helping indigenous local people).

 

We do not utilize this ally program in assistance of "advocacy only" organizations. Not that we don't think they have value, we know they do. We simply have a charter to interface with organizations on the ground, in the field. Our org motto is Keeping It Real.

 

Since I am a newbie here, I won't be so bold as to post info on these organizations, such as prior posts by seasoned members. I will say though, all donations to these organizations, through NWHS, are passed on 100% (less fees, eg PayPal, Network for Good, SWIFT wire costs). These fees are minimal. NWHS is a US Federal 501c3, so American donors receive tax credit for their donation.

 

The $25 dollar donation? It's awesome. Send NWHS, or one of our allies, 1000's of them ;)

My point is, of course, many $25's make a huge difference. $25 USD amounts to a lot in third world nations, because of the favorable exchange rate. People in the UK, Australia, Canada, USA, etc. would be amazed at what $25 means in the African bush, or a local village in Ecuador. Add many more together, and true change can happen. I see it all the time.

 

Many of these smaller, hard working organizations in the field, ask for mailed donations from outside their country, or to Swift (wire) the funds to their bank. Mailing a donation check to a 3rd world country is outside many people's comfort zone. Some nations are "out of bounds" in the USA because of the Homeland Security Act.

 

A foreign wire fee is typically $47.50 in the USA (I know that well, lol) and even more in other developed countries. It's difficult for people to justify an almost $50 wire fee, to donate $25. That is why WildlifeDirect set up their donation handling program, with a NYC, USA office and nonprofit corp. When they were no longer unable to offer that service (their blog role reached 140 groups) due to huge costs, NWHS stepped up to handle the service for a few orgs that desired it, and/or approved by our Board. We can accumulate many of those $25 donations, and wire it direct with much less "fee impact".

 

So as to not use a lot of space at this fine community forum, describing each of the field orgs we assist, interested members can simply view our website. Each ally has their own page, and each donation box is coded to keep allies donations separate. That removes the need for a staff (and costs) to keep it all straight. Each of the ally's pages has pertinent info concerning their projects, location, and operational direction, along with their own video. This allows potential donors to make informed decisions, even if only donating $10.

 

The donors also receive a Thank You email (as a US tax reciept) from us, and their donation is posted in the Thank You box on that ally's page (first name, last initial only, for internet privacy). The ally receives a CC of the donor's receipt, to notify them of the donation. 100% transparency for all involved. The ally can also check on available funds 24/7 on their NWHS page.

 

Here is the Milgis Trust Ally page to see what it looks like.

http://www.humanewildlife.org/milgistrust.html

 

Am I using this thread to promote our allies? Yes, I guess so.. :)

No more than any other posts, pointing out the awesome work of other wildlife field orgs. though. They do truly good work (or they wouldn't be an NWHS ally). NWHS does much more than just acting as a funding conduit, we also conduct fundraisers, internet promotion and outreach (like this post) and even handle some of their online efforts (such as a Facebook Fanpage and Cause app for one, and developing and hosting another's website).

 

So, in my usual verbosity, those $25 donations can be the backbone support for small dedicated field orgs, especially in this very harsh economic climate.

 

So, whether you choose other dedicated field orgs listed here, NWHS allies, or the multitude of non-mentioned field orgs "getting sandy", by all means, reach into your pockets and throw a $10 or $20, whenever you can. Yes, it's just a night at the cinema (or considering a $10) a fast food meal, but it means soo much to those out there doing what we all here talk about. As Game Warden mentioned, at the end of the year you will never miss it.

 

Oh, what about NWHS? Are we an "advocacy only" org? NO

NWHS sprung out of Top Of The Rock Wildlife Sanctuary, which started over 20 years ago.

This is the NWHS Global Corp HQ

http://www.topoftherock.org/photopage/office.jpg

 

Yes, laugh at it if you may... It is paid for in full, surrounded by 1.2 million sq acres of mountain wilderness and adjacent to rescued wolves on the right, and tigers behind it. The tigers were placed here by the government, from confiscations they made. We received nothing from that, and we too depend on donations, to operate our organization and sanctuary.

 

This is a video I shot a few weeks ago, of one of those tigers rescued 9 years ago, out in the playground while we clean her enclosure. (I would make it show up embedded, but not sure how)

http://www.humanewildlife.org/raniplays/

 

So yes, NWHS is truly Keeping It Real.

We and our allies will take all those $25 donations we can get.

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Karen Paolillo is Founder Turgwe Hippo Trust Zimbabwe

 

An idea of how we would spent US$25 here right now December 2010.

 

Christmas bonus to each game scout.

 

Bonus payment for poachers apprehended and taken to court.

 

Bonus for confiscation of fishing nets or bows and arrows, as we destroy them after they have been confiscated.

 

Fuel for one day within this Wildlife Conservancy when checking hippos in other river systems, or searching for a missing Turgwe River hippo.

 

Bonus paid for information from locals for poaching infiltration, when poacher is apprehended.

 

Two and a half days of fuel to run the Trust generator to pump water into the two artificial pans as well as provide electricity at Hippo Haven for staff and ourselves to have water, and for communications with Internet and Emails.

 

Take care, Karen - www.savethehippos.com.

 

To see how you can help the Turgwe Hippo Trust click here. By clicking this link you have not made any commitment to donate.

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Jason Turner is a Lion Ecologist & Scientific Advisor for the Global White Lion Protection Trust (WLT) operating in the greater Timbavati bush region of South Africa. To find out more about the Trust visit their website here: www.whitelions.org.

 

“Days of Freedom Program”

 

Your donation will contribute* towards a ‘Day of Freedom’ for a white lion in their natural endemic habitat:

 

Scientific Research

Radio-tracking collars and telemetry equipment ensure that the reintroduced lions can be monitored at all times for scientific and safety reasons.

 

Anti-poaching & Security

Anti-poaching teams patrol the boundary fences daily, checking for snares and repairing fence-lines when necessary.

 

Reintroduction Program

The scientific research team and monitoring vehicles are vital for the program to reintroduce white lions to their natural endemic habitat.

 

Lion Predation

Shattering all misperceptions the white lion pride is hunting at a mean rate of a kill every 2,5 days. The prey base in the primary reintroduction area therefore needs to be supplemented at times.

 

Habitat & Wildlife Management

Fundamental to conserving the white lion is protecting their prey, and therefore the habitat of that prey. This includes alien plant control, bush-thinning and erosion control programs.

 

Veterinary Care

The WLT uses specialist wildlife veterinarians when immobilizing the lions for immunization, translocation, radio-collaring and contraception.

 

To see how you can help the Global White Lion Protection Trust (WLT) click here. This takes you to the Global White Lion Protection Trust (WLT)'s donation page and by taking this action you will not have made any commitment to donating.

 

* A ‘Day of Freedom’ for a white lion costs the Global White Lion Trust: $45

 

"Your donation will contribute* towards a ‘Day of Freedom’ for a white lion in their natural endemic habitat:"

 

This is UNTRUE!

The natural and endemic habitat for WHITE LIONS is the Timbavati Game Reserve.

These poor animals are NOT wild.

They are used to create revenues in the most cruel ways, via emotional weakness of people.

 

There are WILD WHITE LIONS in Timbavati and those we all should do all we can to preserve.

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"Your donation will contribute* towards a ‘Day of Freedom’ for a white lion in their natural endemic habitat:"



This is UNTRUE!


The natural and endemic habitat for WHITE LIONS is the Timbavati Game Reserve.


These poor animals are NOT wild.


They are used to create revenues in the most cruel ways, via emotional weakness of people.



There are WILD WHITE LIONS in Timbavati and those we all should do all we can to preserve.

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