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Zambia’s state of conservation and development, and the way forward.


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#1 I. P. A. Manning

I. P. A. Manning

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 01:01 AM

The state of conservation in Zambia - something affecting mainly rural people, is parlous: rampant poaching to supply the bushmeat trade and the ivory market; the illegal alienation to developers of state land having the highest protective status; the demise of a National Park and the impoverishment of a cattle owning people as a result of a hydro power barrage and 30 years of managerial apathy; the pollution of a major river; the gathering clouds of future river impoundments - probably by China, in one of the best watered countries in Africa; the irresponsible invasion of our rural areas by donated mosquito nets, now sown together and used to pillage the fishery on which the bushfolk depend; the sport hunting of elephant when all concerned had recommended it should not be allowed; the poorly managed safari hunting industry, milked without much thought for conservation - and now undergoing nationalization by stealth; the failure to recognize the traditional rights of the hunter-gatherers and shifting agriculturists who are in the throes of their Neolithic Revolution; the failure to support conservancies which, under suitable Trust models, point the way to a liberation of the people from a failed and corrupt western capitalist model clamped upon the increasingly irrelevant (to the bushfolk) urban areas. But what is the way forward ?

Zambians must, out of the long night of their community and survival traditions - their culture, discover their future, one more Karl Marx than Adam Smith. This does not lie in looking to the West and China for support in embracing industrialization, in escaping the Malthusian Trap by a futile attempt to make all Zambians in the image of the waPajero - that small group of westernized Zambians who are in a mutualistic parasitic relationship with the donors and direct foreign investors. It lies in an appreciation of rural Zambians, of their distinct culture, where people, despite all the propaganda to the contrary, do live happy lives - though they have few schools, medicine and other facilities, and where the land does provide for them. But open access regimes inevitably destroys the ecology on which a community depends: so ownership of the natural resources is the key, the decentralization of a highly centralized western model to a system where traditional areas have greater autonomy. Such talk is considered seditious in Zambia, though it is what the Constitution and various Acts of Parliament supports - not least the numerous International Conventions to which Zambia is signatory.

#2 Thembi

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Posted 04 February 2008 - 07:34 PM

...the failure to recognize the traditional rights of the hunter-gatherers and shifting agriculturists who are in the throes of their Neolithic Revolution; the failure to support conservancies which, under suitable Trust models, point the way to a liberation of the people from a failed and corrupt western capitalist model clamped upon the increasingly irrelevant (to the bushfolk) urban areas. But what is the way forward ?

Zambians must, out of the long night of their community and survival traditions - their culture, discover their future... Such talk is considered seditious in Zambia, though it is what the Constitution and various Acts of Parliament supports - not least the numerous International Conventions to which Zambia is signatory.


Thanks Ian for this insight into the state of Conservation and community in Zambia - I have just read the book 'White Man's Burden" by William Easterly and his analysis of the top down western models for governance and aid raises very important questions. Particularly the tying of economic develeopment models to the opening up of economies and how this is then hijacked by corporate interests - such as we are seeing all over Africa by the Iinternational Monetary Fund, the World Bank and big interests such as one in the Chinese investment strategies for "natural resources".

What I like about the work Hammer Simwinga is doing is the absolute underpinning of local empowerment, sustainable alternative livelihood as a means to wildlife protection and conservation. I interviewd Hammer here: http://safaritalk.ne...p?showtopic=936

There are similar arguments re: Neolithic Revolution for the crisis in the traditional communities of Australia's indigenous peoples - to impose western models (reaching back to the Ancient Greeks and Romans and involving hundreds of years of patriarchal develeopment and governance and laws) onto ancient idigenous cultures, similar to the first people of the Kalahari is genocidal in fact if not in actual intent. The disenfranchisement, the bamboozling and stealing of their traditional use of land, therefore their spiritual connection to place or "Country" and then branding them backward and micromanaging their lives in the name of progress is appalling.

Could you expound on the models you see that work the best and the way forward for Zambia (seditious or not!)?

Jude

#3 I. P. A. Manning

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 04:41 AM

Sorry, but I have only just seen your reply ! Apologies.....here follows my model:


Manning, I. P. A. 2012. The Landsafe Socio-Ecological Development Model for the Customary Commons of Zambia: Evolution and Formalization, 52 Nat. Resources J. 195. http://lawschool.unm...nrj/current.php
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