RobC

Human-Elephant Conflict and the use of Honeybees: A South African’s Perspective in Sri Lanka

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Human-Elephant Conflict and the use of Honeybees: A South African’s Perspective in Sri Lanka

"My Master of Science degree, for example, centred on the use of African honeybees to protect marula trees from elephant impact. This research, through the Elephants Alive research organisation, was certainly relevant to the South African form of HEC. What an eye-opener it would be for me then to take over as project coordinator at the Elephants and Bees Project’s Sri Lankan study site earlier in July 2017."

 

http://elephantsandbees.com/human-elephant-conflict-and-the-use-of-honeybees-a-south-africans-perspective-in-sri-lanka/

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Brilliant to hear about this @RobC  You must be feeling very pleased. Africa and Sri Lanka 'applying the science'

 

Congratulations

 

 

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5 minutes ago, wilddog said:

Brilliant to hear about this @RobC  You must be feeling very pleased. Africa and Sri Lanka 'applying the science'

 

Congratulations

 

 

Thank you @wilddog!

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Bravo @RobC!     

 

Question for you:   were Honey Badgers raiding beehives a problem in South Africa?   Did you have to predator-proof any beehives in either S. Africa or Sri Lanka?

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Thanks @offshorebirder 

In South Africa we did not have any issues with honey badgers as the hives were quite a way down from the trees' branches, making it difficult to reach. They are also too high off the ground to reach. We actually did some trial experiments first at a closed facility to ensure that honeybadgers could not reach them. In Kenya back in 2009, the fences around the farms needed to be redesigned to ensure that the hives were out of reach for honey badgers. This meant hanging them higher off the ground. We had no mammalian predator issues in Sri Lanka. The lesser banded hornet was probably the biggest predatory issue there. 

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