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offshorebirder

Climate Change Threatens the World’s Parasites (That’s Not Good)

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https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/13/science/parasites-extinction-climate-change.html

 

"Recently, scientists carried out the first large-scale study of what climate change may do to the world’s much-loathed parasites. The team came to a startling conclusion: as many as one in three parasite species may face extinction in the next century.  As global warming raises the planet’s temperature, the researchers found, many species will lose territory in which to survive. Some of their hosts will be lost, too.

 

“It still absolutely blows me away,” said Colin J. Carlson, lead author of the study and a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley.

 

He knows many people may react to the news with a round of applause. “Parasites are obviously a hard sell,” Mr. Carlson said.  But as much as a tapeworm or a blood fluke may disgust us, parasites are crucial to the world’s ecosystems. Their extinction may effect entire food webs, perhaps even harming human health.

 

Parasites deserve some of the respect that top predators have earned in recent decades. Wolves were once considered vermin, for example — but as they disappeared, ecosystems changed.

 

Scientists realized that as top predators, wolves kept populations of prey in check, which allowed plants to thrive. When wolves were restored to places like Yellowstone, local ecosystems revived, as well."

Edited by offshorebirder
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That interconnected-ness in CR's signature is being tinkered with by us. 

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long before there was more precise research done, a scientist stated that in Australia everything above Lismore in nthn New South Wales could be affected by malaria

 

the current situation is for zero risk

 

in climate chane we are creating our own monster

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Predicting the future is complex , researchers need new statistical models that incorporate both climate factors and the climate-disease relationship, accounting for uncertainties in both.

 

 

 Report continues    

 

Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. "To predict how climate change will affect disease, researchers must fuse climate science and biology." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 September 2017.

 

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/09/170918123547.htm

 

 

open access article  http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/284/1860/20170901

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