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COSMIC RHINO

Estrogen in zebra finches possible impact on human medicine

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Figuring out how these natural processes work in songbirds paves the way for study in mammals, to figure out potential therapies and ways that humans can make use of estrogen to slow brain degeneration and inflammation, the kind that results from injury such as stroke, Alzheimer's or Parkinson's.

 

for report please see

 

American University. "Songbird study shows how estrogen may stop infection-induced brain inflammation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 August 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170831113021.htm>.
 
all very interesting, shows how much humans have in common with the rest of life, but this will need a whole lot of work before there is a clinically useful theraphy
Edited by COSMIC RHINO
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 The title is definitely not something you'd see every day.

 

This could help stroke, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's sufferers.

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sciencedaily covers a great range  of science news  in a non technical way  with a link to the research paper

 

everything is broken down  into broad subject areas which then go down to sub topics

 

I subscribe to several different bulletins for environmental and health news

 

I think that  I  first came across them on the Save the Elephants news

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