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Posted (edited)

Hi all

As some of you on here know, my wife and I were planning a trip to Zambia for July this year (previous post in this section) , but we had to back out of it following the follow-up scan Rachel ( my wife) had, which required further chemo treatment and follow-up surgery.  

It turns out the chemo worked so well that no surgery is required, and currently no further treatment, although another scan in three months time could change that.

This has left us with the opportunity to have a much needed holiday in this period and so we plan to go to Northern Tanzania in October, which means we have very little time to sort everything out. 

We've excluded the Zambia option because we wanted to go there when it was greener, and not so hot, and so we have settled on Northern Tanzania because we researched it a lot a couple of years ago (prior to chosing south and west Tanzania back then), and went on safari to Northern Tanzania back in January 2001, meaning we know enough already to decide where want to stay, etc.

 

Therefore we have already decided precisely what we want to do and intend to get that booked with ATR this coming week. I'll post details of our intinery in a couple of days time when its sorted (we intend to stay in Lake Manyara, Ngorongoro and Serengeti), but we do have a few questions that we really would like answers to quickly, so your advice would be very much appreciated.

 

Flights

 

Plastic bags in Kenya - Flying from the UK it seems most flights transit through Nairobi ( at least on the return flight even if not on the outward). Does the Kenya plastic bags ban affect people in transit through Kenya ( ie plastic bags in your luggage)  ?

 

We could use BA flights which go out via Qatar but they still go back via Nairobi.

 

Which flights/routes would any of you recommend going from the UK?

 

Electronics on Planes

 

Are there any restrictions on flights from UK to Tanzania regarding travelling with cameras, etc on the plane?

 

Any recent new restrictions?

 

Luggage restrictions on light aircraft 

 

We will be having a few air transfers - Is restriction still 15Kg total per person, and do they weigh it in Kilimanjaro/Arusha ( wherever first departure point is)?

 

Yellow Fever

 

Although only transiting through Kenya, is this likely to be checked? ( it wasnt when we traveled two years ago. We have certs but it was done in 2006 and cert states valid for 10 years , even though we have been assured we do not require another vaccination as ours was the same as vac currently used, and is now valid for life)

 

Also is the Cholera outbreak in Kenya of any significance if transiting through?

 

VISAS

 

Any issues experienced with obtaining a Tanzanian visa by post (ie delays)?

 

Weather Conditions

 

We will be there second half of October - are we actually likely to experience much rainfall?

What has the Northern Tanzania weather been like this year ( ie typical or rather unusual)?

 

Tsetse Flies

 

Are they likely to be a problem in October? 

 

What anti-histamine would be helpful ( Rachel got quite a bad reaction to these bites on our last safari)?

 

Currency/Tipping

 

We took US $ ( all bills later than 2006) for all cash purchases and tipping two years ago . Is this still OK?

 

First day- overnight Arusha

 

We intend to spend our first night in lodge/hotel in Arusha to catch up on sleep as flight highly likely to be overnight flight.

Any recommendations?

 

Also our first air transfer will need to be to to Lake Manyara airstrip - Do these transfers go from Arusha or Kilimanjaro or both?

 

Locations

 

Anything specific/unusual/ problems/etc  happening recently that we should be aware of in Manyara/Ngorongoro /Serengeti?

Edited by Julian

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Posted (edited)

I had no problems carrying electronics in my hand luggage flying between Edinburgh and Dar last month. Yellow fever is very unlikely to be checked even if it is a supposed requirement. I've had it checked once when crossing a border overland (can't remember which countries I was crossing between). By the time I'd dug it out of my luggage the woman that asked me for it had knocked off for lunch.

Edited by Csaba
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I had my YF cert checked going from Rwanda into Kenya at Kenya Airport as we got off the plane (before immigration and luggage), so Kenya does check if you're coming from a potentially YF country.

 

I always pay and tip in local currency, especially in Africa where those I'm tipping may not have ready access to banks to exchange.  I also don't want to pass the cost of converting on to them, decreasing the value of whatever I'm giving.

 

We spent landing day/overnight and departure day at Arumeru River Lodge, which I recall being close enough to easily catch flights at the airport.  I remember more the wonderful grounds and accommodations though.  It was quite idyllic and nice to walk around amongst the many birds and dik diks running about.

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I wouldn't imagine that plastic bags would be an issue if you are only transiting through Nairobi, the news report I listened to, the Kenyan woman interviewed said that they weren't intending to prosecute ordinary people; their objective was to force the manufacturers to stop producing bags in the first place. I hope in time this will be a success and lead to the demise of what is jokingly referred to as Kenya’s national flower the plastic bag bush, Rwanda banned plastic bags completely in 2008. Tanzania should also have banned plastic bags, they were due to do so in January but the decision was delayed so I'm not sure if it is in force yet. Whatever the case I don’t think it will be a problem in either country for tourists.   

 

For flights you could co KLM because they direct fly to Kili, from recollection the Amsterdam – Kili flight is at 10:00 a.m. so even if you decide to stay the previous night at Heathrow, this necessitates a very early start to catch the flight to Amsterdam which leaves London at 06:30, however you can get around this by flying the previous evening and staying the night at one of the airport hotels at Schipol instead of one at Heathrow. Then you don’t have get up far too early and can either have breakfast at your hotel or maybe go slightly earlier to Schipol and have a leisurely breakfast there. If you’re not based anywhere near Heathrow, then I suppose a flight from your local airport to Amsterdam the previous evening could be very convenient if you decide to stay the night in Amsterdam, I imagine it shouldn't be too difficult to fly to there from most parts of the UK. 

 

I don’t recall ever having my hand luggage weighed at Arusha so I've never had a problem with the weight limit, but they do x-ray all of your luggage, I once arrived there on a flight from Ruaha and discovered I had left my Swiss Army knife in my pocket, when no one was watching I put in my camera bag sent it through the machine and fortunately no one spotted it or if they did it wasn't problem.  I was a bit concerned so if you have a knife, try not to make the same mistake.

 

Generally they should only be interested in checking your yellow fever certificate if you are coming from a country where yellow fever is endemic, the certificate should indicate that you can’t be a carrier. The virus is spread by Aedes mosquitoes so all countries that have these mosquitoes, but don’t yellow fever will ask for a certificate if you've been in country that does have it. So going direct from London to Nairobi it shouldn't be an issue. I wasn't aware of the cholera outbreak but I wouldn't be concerned about this even if you were going to Kenya, I don't think cholera poses much danger to the ordinary safari tourist 

 

I've not had a problem applying for a Tanzanian Visas by mail; you can also get visas on arrival.

 

I've not been in October so can’t comment on weather or tsetses at this time of year, I can say the worst place I have been in the north for tsetses is Tarangire but that was on a February trip and some years ago and you’re not going there. So I wouldn't worry, I've not encountered bad tsetses in the Serengeti and none in the Crater but if you’re going to an area where there’s a fair bit of woodland then there might be a few.   

 

Not necessarily the quickest place to get to but I've stayed a few times at Ngare Sero Mountain Lodge which is outside Arusha in the forest at the base of Mt Meru. If you’re not just looking for a bed, but will have a few hours of daylight there before leaving, it’s a beautiful place, it was an old colonial farmhouse and has a nice garden and grounds with a small lake/pond out in front and surrounded by forest full of birds and Kilimanjaro black and white colobus  and Sykes monkeys. It also has a pool if you want one however it is a bit further from Kilimanjaro Airport and from Arusha Airport than the other options which may also be cheaper. It’s only really worth going if you have long enough to appreciate the monkeys, birds etc, if the weathers clear you can also get views of Mt Kilimanjaro as well as Mt Meru, there’s no guarantee that you will see Kili and obviously you won’t if you are leaving too early. Whether it’s worth considering may depend on what flights you decide to go for with KLM you would be arriving at Kili in the evening so you wouldn't get there until well after dark so you’d have quite a late night.  If you then have to get an early flight from Arusha somewhere else closer to the airport would be better. However if you were on a different airline and arriving on a morning flight into Kili or flying up from DSM then you would get to Ngare Sero in time for lunch and have a whole afternoon there.   

 

I haven’t actually been to Manyara but I just happened to have a look at the TANAPA website for some other reason and the first thing I saw on their homepage is that they have built a canopy walkway in Manyara’s forest which is interesting. This is the first canopy walkway in Tanzania and only the third one that I know of in Africa, the first is in Kakum NP in Ghana and the second in Nyungwe NP in Rwanda, I haven’t heard of any others.  You might already know about this, I wouldn't know how much wildlife you are likely to see from the walkway, but if you've got sufficient time in Manyara NP and you are okay with heights then it would be worth checking out.       

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Hi Julian.  I've taken two routes over the last 8 years going back and forth.  KLM through Amsterdam.  Always easy and rarely any problems but once.  I've also flown Qatar twice and really liked this but the connections to where I go in the US from Doha are not good.  There is always a really long layover for me in Doha.  But, the advantage was it arrives mid-afternoon in Kilimanjaro instead of the evening or middle of the night.  I used Qatar in June and the flight into Kili and out of Kili connected directly to Doha.  No stop either way.  I noticed that this depended on the day I was leaving Kili.  On certain days there was a stop in Nairobi or Zanzibar.  On other days there was not. 

 

I always get my Visa at the airport.

 

I have flown Coastal air to Seronera airstrip from Arusha.  They did weigh our bags although it was a "collective weight".  They did not weigh any hand held items but these have to be small. 

 

I was in northern Serengeti in mid October a couple of years ago.  No tsetse that I remember and they are a real problem for me.  If I do get bit I take a half of a tablet of diphenhydramine and it does seem to help.  But take it right away.  If I'm going in an area with lots of tsetse I take it before I go. It did pour with rain on two afternoons.  And I mean pour.  Closed the Kogatende airstrip one day.  But the storms last only 30 minutes or so, then it was beautiful and sunny.  And very green.  

 

I've slept in several places in Arusha from the more upmarket to the very budget.  Rivertrees Lodge is very nice but expensive if you are only going to be there one night, probably not worth it.  Arusha hotel was also nice, although not as nice as Rivertrees.  Breakfast there was awesome.  Outpost Lodge but can not recommend it any more.  Accommodation there varies greatly.  Some good.  Some really bad.  Tumaini hotel was economical and nice but too far out of the way if your not staying in Arusha for a while.  My most frequent choice now is Mvuli hotel.  It is not luxury.  Basic.  But very clean.  Great air conditioning.  Very helpful staff.  They will pick you up from the Kili airport if needed and charge less than the standard rate, but your safari company will probably handle this anyway.  They can also take you to Arusha airport and it is fairly close.  I think the fee for all of us was something ridiculously low like $10.  Breakfast is not luxurious but what they do offer is very good.   Cost is about $50/night so I usually choose this place if I just need someplace to sleep.   

 

Have a great trip!

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I encountered quite bad Tse Tse bites in Kogatende in June.  Outside of the open areas, they always seemed to be around (except in the early morning hours when it was cooler) ...... Ditto in Southern Serengeti in the wooded areas.  In October, I suppose you will be in Kogatende?

 

Visas - if you are able to do it in advance, I would recommend that.  The wait at the airport in queue could be avoided.

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Thanks very much  for all of your replies  - I'll comment on each in the next day or so. In the meantime, I have one more question:

 

Ethiopian Airlines 

 

Our choice of flights is limited ( unless we paid a lot more) as its only a few weeks away. Looking at Ethiopian.

Anyone have experience of using these , including what the airport is like in Addis Ababa as we would be changing planes there, and have six hours there on the way back.

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I mostly use Ethiopian. Flights are always fine and on time. Addis airport is not very pleasant, it can be extremely crowded. It was always quite fine when transiting through in the morning, but in the evening it can be a challenge to find a free seat anywhere.

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21 minutes ago, michael-ibk said:

I mostly use Ethiopian. Flights are always fine and on time. Addis airport is not very pleasant, it can be extremely crowded. It was always quite fine when transiting through in the morning, but in the evening it can be a challenge to find a free seat anywhere.

 

I agree with what Michael says ...... The airline itself was good - on time, good service etc etc., but, the airport was extremely chaotic.  For those who have been to the old Mumbai airport in the 90s or before ....... it pretty much reminded me of those times!

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Thanks @amybatt , @Csaba, @inyathi, @kilopascal, @madaboutcheetah, @michael-ibk

 

You have all provided helpful information - I wont comment in more detail  as I have now completed booked our safari booking with ATR,

and some of the concerns became irrelevant (eg  not transiting through Nairobi, so concerns re plastic bags and Yellow Fever cert  no longer matters).

Our itinery, including why we have chosen the places we will stay, will follow later today.  

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@amybatt, @Csaba, @inyathi, @kilopascal, @madaboutcheetah, @michael-ibk

 

Thanks once again for all your replies  ( I've finally figured out how to get the@ name link to work om my PC)

 

Our Northern Tanzania Itinerary: - 21st October to 3rd November

 

Day1:  Rivertrees 

Days 2-4: Manyara Tree Lodge 

Days 5-8: Ngorongoro Highlands Camp

Days: 9-13 Namiri Plains Camp

 

 

Who we booked with and why:

 

Booked with ATR. We decided all the camps and length of stay bat each before speaking with ATR.

They were , as usual, extremely helpful, efficient, prompt and were completely at ease with all our choices and plenty of minor alterations we made.

As always with ATR the itinerary is broken down into every separate price element for each day - so you know exactly what you are being charged for everything - camps, transfers, National Park fees, etc,etc. 

We were charged slightly the daily rack-rate for each of the safari camps or slightly less, including special offers ( we got a free night at Namiri as Asila are doing 6 for 5 on any combination of their camps - saving over £1400),  and the published cost for things like air transfers, park rates, etc.  

Three of our transfers are by Coastal Air - Arusha to Manyara, Manyara to Seronera and Seronera  to Kilimanjaro.

They state that they only allow a mall camera bag or hand bag that sits on your lap in addition to the hold luggage.

ATR indicated the option of booking an XL seat instead of standard - which gives you 30Kg luggage allowance instead of 15Kg.

 

Therefore on each flight we have one of us on the standard ticket and one with XL. It costs about 25% more for the XL seat. This means a lot to us as we always struggle with the 15kg limit and worry if they will want to weigh the camera bag as well (which isnt huge but neither is it small). Its the camera equipment, accessories, and toiletries that always take up so much of the limit. We will probably only have about 5 to 7kg over the 30kg  but it will make packing far less of a concern. 

The total cost for the extra luggage allowance on the three flights worked out at £115.

 

Our international return flights are with Ethiopian Airways  -Heathrow, via Addis Ababa to Kilimanjaro and cost £719pp. 

We didnt really have any of other flight choices, booking rather close to when we travel, unless we wanted to nearly  double the cost.

 

This isnt a cheap safari - the camp rates were all fairly similar and averaged out at about £650pp per night.

The total cost for the 12 night safari, plus I night in Arusha, plus all transfers and all eaxtras (excluding flights from the UK) worked out at  just over £9000 per person.

 

Insurance was going to be difficult - to get Rachels 'pre-existing medical conditions' included -  but we eventually found one that would cover all the cancer circumstances - 'Allclear Insurance Services Ltd'.

  

Why we chose Northern Tanzania, and these specific locations and camps: 

 

Two weeks ago we had no idea we would be able to go on any holiday in the foreseeable future as Rachel was still having Chemo treatment which was due to be followed by surgery ( lung nodule) to remove what was still left , probably followed by more treatment.

All that changed when the consultant told us the treatment had worked much better than anticipated, the remains appear to be dead cells, and no further treatment would be required - pending the results of a further scan in three months time ( which may confirm clear or otherwise.). The consultant also confirmed it would be fine for us to go on holiday , on a safari, prior to the next scan.

 

So after nearly two years of not being able to plan ahead for anything we obviously jumped at the chance to go back to Africa.

We needed to decide quickly. The Zambia safari we had hoped to have back in July ( Rachel's 50th birthday) had to be shelved due to Rachel's cancer, but we didnt want to go to Zambia in late October - far too hot, dusty, etc.

Also we needed the safari to be a fairly easy going, relaxed safari and, for the  first time for us , maximising the wildlife viewing was not the highest priority - although Namiri may well turn out to be one of the best for wildlife.

 

Our last safari in 2015 was to Southern and Western Tanzania and at that time we also researched all the Northern locations as that was a consideration.

Also we went to Northern Tanzania on our first safari together in January 2001 - a somewhat different safari to the type we now do - a package safari with Kuoni, with a guide driving us from Arusha to Lake Manyara , where the last 20 miles - in the minibus - were on broken rocks. We also went to Ngorongoro and central and western Serengeti - all the lodges/ camps we stayed in were Serena owned.

We had always wanted to go back to Manyara and Ngorongoro, so it was an obvious easy choice for us to get the safari sorted very quickly.

 

Lake Manyara - Tree Lodge:

 

Lake Manyara NP doesnt seem to be rated highly by hardly anyone, but we loved it when we went there in 2001.

Yes- now at the northern end where the entrance is it can be very busy , and we understand there is now a sizeable town and lots of traffic just outside  - but thats why we chose Manyara tree lodge - right down in the south of Manyara - the only camp located in the park and almost exclusive game driving area. The rooms are also rather nicely designed.  WE dont expect to see big cats but there is plenty of other wildlife.

 

Ngorongoro Highlands Asilia Camp:

 

We thought about the Nomad camp on the Crater rim but were really taken by the Highlands camp - not only bacause of the Geodysic 'tents' ( which do look amazing), but even more importantly , the precise location meaning they enter Ngorongoro crater via the far less busy Northern descent road, and they have a private site for lunch in the crater. There are also walks to Olmoti and Empakaai crater.

 

There is always a lot of comment about how busy the crater is, but it is packed with wildlife, and for me it is just such a stunning awesome place. It is the only place I have ever been where upon seeing it for the first time ( from the famous viewing point) I can truly say it was jaw-dropping. In fact we think its so good that we are going to have two trips to the Ngorongoro crater ( in case one day doesnt live up to expectations or it rained a lot) on our 2nd and 4th days at Highlands.

 

Serengeti - Namiri Plains:

 

I dont really need to say much about why we are ending our safari with five nights here - the Trip Report section on this forum already has the many fantastic photos and reports from several on here who have already had the wonderful experience of going there. We like all the wildlife , but we do really like the big cats - and judging by others opinions (including the many reviews on Tripadvisor)  - we will be very unlucky if we dont get excellent big cat viewings over five days.

 

We are naturally very excited !- very busy on all the other preparations......... and counting the days down......... 44...

 

Be interested to know any of your comments regarding our choices

 

 

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Posted (edited)

@Julian how fantastic that this trip came together for you and Rachel so quickly. Your itinerary looks wonderful, just 4 accommodations that will allow for plenty of rest and having a good look around the area you are staying. Rivertrees is a scenic and restful lodge, they have a wonderful vegetable garden there where a lot of the food for the kitchen is grown - or it was in 2008.

 

I'm with you, I quite like Lake Manyara NP possibly because it has so much water running through it to the lake that sometimes attracts animals and birds to take up places close to the road. One day, I hope to stay at the Tree Lodge. I like the sound of the Highlands Camp, using the quieter northern access road and the private lunch spot are definite bonuses. I wonder if someone has explained the idea of 'private' lunch spot to the Whistling Kites?

 

Its interesting isn't it how we look back on our first, modest safari itinerary (in my case) and measure how far we have grown (in safari terms) with preferences for private guides and small camps? I did a Serena-based Northern Circuit safari in 2005, which gave me a taste for private safaris because I was the only one booked on the trip.

Edited by Treepol
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@Julian  I just honestly don't know what to say. I'm feeling a little weepy, nostalgic, whatever. I am in complete and total awe of both yours and Rachel's perseverance and determination to grab life by the balls. Your reasoning for why you have chosen what you have is brilliant. It speaks to both of your heightened joy of life. And, in particular, your love of Africa. From your first safari together in 2001 to the trips in between. Tanzania is a perfect choice. Despite all the negatives, Ngorongoro is a jaw dropping place. The sheer geological aspect alone makes it so. My memories of this magical place helped shape my total love of Africa as a continent. I can say the same of the Serengeti. This was my first trip ever and I remember never wanting to sleep in case I'd miss something. Bliss. After many trips to Africa now, it's now all about seeing what I see, hearing what I hear, smelling what I smell.....it is now about a peace that helps heal my soul when I go there....no matter what I see or smell or hear. Maybe I'm wrong, but I interpret that it is this peace that is desired. And this trip will provide that. You have chosen perfection.

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I can't say it any better than @lmonmm did.  I'll just add how happy I am that you finally get to go and savor your Africa with each other.  Wishing you the best of safaris, you've certainly earned it!  

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FYI - Namiri Plains ....... Great great spot in the Serengeti!!!!  I'm just booked to return there for 7 nights next April.

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10 hours ago, Treepol said:

@Julian how fantastic that this trip came together for you and Rachel so quickly. Your itinerary looks wonderful, just 4 accommodations that will allow for plenty of rest and having a good look around the area you are staying. Rivertrees is a scenic and restful lodge, they have a wonderful vegetable garden there where a lot of the food for the kitchen is grown - or it was in 2008.

 

I'm with you, I quite like Lake Manyara NP possibly because it has so much water running through it to the lake that sometimes attracts animals and birds to take up places close to the road. One day, I hope to stay at the Tree Lodge. I like the sound of the Highlands Camp, using the quieter northern access road and the private lunch spot are definite bonuses. I wonder if someone has explained the idea of 'private' lunch spot to the Whistling Kites?

 

Its interesting isn't it how we look back on our first, modest safari itinerary (in my case) and measure how far we have grown (in safari terms) with preferences for private guides and small camps? I did a Serena-based Northern Circuit safari in 2005, which gave me a taste for private safaris because I was the only one booked on the trip.

@Treepol

Thanks for your comments - nice to know that you liked Rivertrees , the ATR photos of it were enough to decide we wanted to stay there - even if it is for only one day. We should be there by mid-afternoon so will have a few hours at leisure.

Forgot to mention Asilia actually have a chef cooking a hot lunch for you in the Ngorongoro crater.

Our first safari was very safaria in 2001 was also very modest - just 6 days and the first day was in Arusha at Lake Diluti lodge.

 

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9 hours ago, lmonmm said:

@Julian  I just honestly don't know what to say. I'm feeling a little weepy, nostalgic, whatever. I am in complete and total awe of both yours and Rachel's perseverance and determination to grab life by the balls. Your reasoning for why you have chosen what you have is brilliant. It speaks to both of your heightened joy of life. And, in particular, your love of Africa. From your first safari together in 2001 to the trips in between. Tanzania is a perfect choice. Despite all the negatives, Ngorongoro is a jaw dropping place. The sheer geological aspect alone makes it so. My memories of this magical place helped shape my total love of Africa as a continent. I can say the same of the Serengeti. This was my first trip ever and I remember never wanting to sleep in case I'd miss something. Bliss. After many trips to Africa now, it's now all about seeing what I see, hearing what I hear, smelling what I smell.....it is now about a peace that helps heal my soul when I go there....no matter what I see or smell or hear. Maybe I'm wrong, but I interpret that it is this peace that is desired. And this trip will provide that. You have chosen perfection.

@lmonmm Thank you for your wonderful comments - they made me feel very emotional, and its always really nice to know there are others who have very similar strong feelings about going on an African safari, and about the beauty of the African landscapes. It is the peace you describe that we need - and we know being on a safari in Africa always melts away any worries and concerns about life back at home.

 

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8 hours ago, amybatt said:

I can't say it any better than @lmonmm did.  I'll just add how happy I am that you finally get to go and savor your Africa with each other.  Wishing you the best of safaris, you've certainly earned it!  

@amybatt Thank you so much for  your kind comments.

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6 hours ago, madaboutcheetah said:

FYI - Namiri Plains ....... Great great spot in the Serengeti!!!!  I'm just booked to return there for 7 nights next April.

@madaboutcheetah I hope it really lives up to expectations. I noticed from a review on Tripadvisor that some guests saw both a serval and a caracal while they were at Namiri. We've not seen either before. ( I think we also have a chance of seeing a serval in the Ngorongoro crater.)

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Posted (edited)

I would appreciate  any comments if anyone on here  has been to Asilia Ngorongoro Highlands camp or to &Beyond  Lake Manyara Tree Lodge.

No concerns, as we are very happy that we will be staying at these camps, but just like to know others experience and feelings about the camps, wildlife and game drives,etc, while there.

Edited by Julian

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@Julian - I have never been ..... but, met several people in June that had been to Highlands ..... They all loved it.  Not great access to the Crater from the camp, but, you will have the chance to get in a lot of lovely Hikes in the area around camp in the NCA. 

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6 hours ago, madaboutcheetah said:

@Julian - I have never been ..... but, met several people in June that had been to Highlands ..... They all loved it.  Not great access to the Crater from the camp, but, you will have the chance to get in a lot of lovely Hikes in the area around camp in the NCA. 

 

@madaboutcheetah thanks for your reply.  We are already prepared for the very bumpy drive of about an hour from the camp to the north descent road of the ngorongoro crater, as there are a lot of reviews on Tripadvisor mentioning this. 

How many hikes we do will be dependant upon whether Rachel feels up to it,, but we are treating this part of the safari as having the longest time to just chill-out, and it does seem a great place to do that.

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Less than a week to go....... the excitement level is rising............

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How exciting this Africa trip is finally on the horizon @Julian. I am sure you and Rachel will have a wonderful time. :)

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@wilddog

thank you Wilddog we are so looking forward to this, and I will also look forward to producing a detailed trip report when we return.

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