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COSMIC RHINO

vertebrae modern and wooly rhinos possible decline

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study of museum specimens of the spine of both woolly and modern rhinos gives rise to concern

 

the cervical rib is absent  this is often associated with inbreeding and adverse environmental conditions during pregnancy

 

it has been recently found that mammoths had a rate  of this condition 10 times greater  than modern elephants 

 

the team considers that this could  been connected to the  extinction of both species

 

there is also concern about the lack of diversity in modern rhinos , and it is recommended that  their spines be monitored

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Can you provide the link to this study please @COSMIC RHINO ? Thank you

 

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Posted (edited)

sorry  I forgot

 

  1. van der Geer and Galis. High incidence of cervical ribs indicates vulnerable condition in Late Pleistocene woolly rhinoceroses. PeerJ, 2017 DOI: 10.7717/peerj.3684

PeerJ. "Woolly rhino neck ribs provide clues about their decline and eventual extinction: Fossils point to rare condition in the extinct species, possibly caused by inbreeding and harsh conditions during pregnancy. Monitoring vertebrae in modern rhinos could indicate the level of extinction risk." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 August 2017.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Edited by COSMIC RHINO
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Posted (edited)

for  modern rhinos please see 

 

http://www.nature.com/articles/srep41417.pdf

 

 

Y Moodley and others   OPEN  ACCESS  Extinctions, genetic erosion and conservation options for the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis)

Edited by COSMIC RHINO

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