Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
offshorebirder

Indian House Crows spreading inland - a grave threat to E. African ecology

3 posts in this topic

I received word that Indian House Crows have recently been seen at Kilimanjaro Airport and also Iringa, Tanzania.  

 

The spread of this invasive species is worrisome indeed - they are having terrible effects on native birds and other wildlife in coastal Kenya.  

 

Experts say that if Indian House Crows reach Lake Victoria and its A] unlimited fresh water and B] unlimited food like fish scraps and garbage - that their population will rapidly explode across Uganda and western Kenya.

 

There is talk of trapping and/or poisoning schemes but the sense of urgency just isn't there on the part of the powers that be in Kenya.   Probably the same in TZ.  Very short-sighted if you ask me.  They should have House Crow control squads going round shooting the "scouts"  on the inland edge of the species' current range.  Combined with active control measures in areas they have become established.  Many livelihoods and entire industries are at risk if this isn't addressed.

 

The more one knows, the more depressing it all is...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope they don't resort to poisoning as that could do an awfull lot of damage to non-target species. They trap them in large numbers in Dubai, and this would be a much more sustainable method of control

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

19 hours ago, Irish Elk said:

I hope they don't resort to poisoning as that could do an awfull lot of damage to non-target species. They trap them in large numbers in Dubai, and this would be a much more sustainable method of control

 

Potential plans I have heard involve putting the poisoned baits in a dispenser that only the House Crows are able to open / access.  Obviously fast-degrading poisons that don't bio-accumulate up the food chain would be needed.  

 

Dubai is a pretty different situation - almost no fresh water and bleak  + highly limited available habitat ,etc.     Hiring people to check the traps over a MUCH wider area in Kenya would be prohibitively expensive...

Edited by offshorebirder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


© 2006 - 2017 www.safaritalk.net - Talking Safaris and African Wildlife Conservation since 2006. Passionate about Africa.