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Tulips

Kenya Plastic Bag Ban from August 28

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@Tulips  I didn't see anything in the article about ziplock bags. This is a ban on those larger plastic bags from stores. Ziplocks should be fine. Rwanda has had a similar ban and I used plastic bags to wrap my boots in and had no problem.  As long as you leave with them, I don't think they care.

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Posted (edited)

I read additional guidance on this over the weekend and it specifically said it is targeting the temporary, disposable type you'd get at shops or stores. I took the packing Ziplocs to Rwanda which also has a similar ban,with no ill effects.  I think you'll be fine.

 

Edit follow this link "Clarifications-Alternatives-Exemptions" :  Here you go

 

Edited by amybatt

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Thanks @lmonmm and @amybatt.  I see the list does refer to grocery store bags and garbage bags.  I don't quite see where it exempts zip locks though.  I know everyone has said they aren't a problem in Rwanda, but I don't think Rwanda arrests people for such things.

 

Its the whole bit about arresting people for a plastic bag that has me freaked out.  

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The point is the heavy duty packing ziplocs are not what they are targeting.  I wouldn't think twice about using them to pack when I go back.

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@Tulips It is clearly talking about large garbage bags and store shopping bags. Seriously, you will not be arrested for having a ziplock bag in your luggage. It is not in Kenya's best interest to start arresting tourists for having ziplock bags in their luggage. I have travelled with ziplock bags of all sizes since I began traveling- never had a problem. And like I said, even the "damned" grocery bags around my boots- no problem. The target of this ban, as it has been in the US, is to keep these bags out of the landfills and littering the streets. You won't be doing that so honestly, no worries.

 

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Well, you both seem very confident and I value your opinions.  So if you dint think it an issue, I will go with the ziplocks and something else for my laundry as I normally use a plastic bag.  LOL!

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5 hours ago, Tulips said:

Yikes!  Was going to do Ziplock bags.  Don't think I will chance it now.

 

http://www.premiumtimesng.com/foreign/africa/241040-kenyan-govt-arrest-charge-anyone-caught-plastic-bags.html

In fact, ziplocks are required for your liquids on the airplane.  I am sure you'll be fine if you don't litter, which you wouldn't anyways.

 

So much for one of my standards that I always take on every trip--a garbage bag.  Thanks for the warning.

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I likely won't be popular for this, but I saw this on Twitter and Facebook

 

 

 

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@Tulips do whatever you feel comfortable with.  I'm done beating this horse! LOL!  I'm not exactly sure how you'll comply with the 3-1-1 liquids bag rule if it's not a Ziploc bag!  But good luck trying!

 

@Atravelynn I usually take a now-banned shopping bag to put the bush-bathroom waste in, which I then dump in my tent when I return.  Guess I'll be switching to paper lunch bags!

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I am glad to see this ban going into effect.  

 

It should greatly reduce "takataka" in Kenya's environment.

 

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Wales was the first country which is a part of the UK to introduce a compulsory purchase price on every new plastic carrier bag used at the checkout in all stores. The money raised goes to charity.

Scotland, Northern Ireland and eventually England followed suit although unbelievably England still allows small shops to give them away with purchases. 

At first visitors to Wales complained that they had spent x amount and were expected to pay for a bag on top. They miss the point.

Large supermarkets boast about how much they have raised for charity. They miss the point.

Manufacturers continue to sell foodstuffs wrapped in plastic so you are at the supermarket checkout loading your purchases into your "bag for life" which you have now hopefully started bringing to the supermarket and nearly everything you put in it is covered in some form of plastic. They miss the point.  

 

Look at places like India and Africa where organised waste disposal doesn't exist. Rubbish lying around everywhere.

Look were it is collected. It's dumped in to ever decreasing availability of landfill sites where it will take a 1000 years to decompose.

There has to be a solution, and it needs implementing worldwide and soon.

 

Generations to come will wonder why we missed the point when we could have done something about it.

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, amybatt said:

@Tulips do whatever you feel comfortable with.  I'm done beating this horse! LOL!  I'm not exactly sure how you'll comply with the 3-1-1 liquids bag rule if it's not a Ziploc bag!  But good luck trying!

 

@Atravelynn I usually take a now-banned shopping bag to put the bush-bathroom waste in, which I then dump in my tent when I return.  Guess I'll be switching to paper lunch bags!

Good plan.  Now if only my state would institute a similar ban.  But that won't happen because about 3 years a law was passed that outlawed the outlaw of plastic bags.  It's like they are being worshiped.  We pray at the alter of the plastic bag.

Edited by Atravelynn
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2 hours ago, Dave Williams said:

Look at places like India and Africa where organised waste disposal doesn't exist. Rubbish lying around everywhere.

Look were it is collected. It's dumped in to ever decreasing availability of landfill sites where it will take a 1000 years to decompose.

There has to be a solution, and it needs implementing worldwide and soon.

 

Generations to come will wonder why we missed the point when we could have done something about it.

 

@Dave Williams my eyes were opened wide in Rwanda, which is, hands down, the cleanest country I've ever been to, from top to bottom, from capital city to volcano-side.  But they have the plastic bag ban AND the mandatory "cleaning day" once a month where everyone is required to clean up around their cities/towns for 3 hours.  Politicians included.  If that isn't a textbook case of "this can work if you just try", I don't know what is.  I saw so many citizens picking things up off the ground randomly, it was as if this mandatory effort has made them realize that if they don't pick it up now, someone will have to later.  If only our first world countries could take a page out of this book.  (I also appreciate their car-free days, where everyone walks or bikes or just stays home for a half-day rather than pollute with vehicles)

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1 hour ago, Atravelynn said:

Good plan.  Now if only my state would institute a similar ban.  But that won't happen because about 3 years a law was passed that outlawed the outlaw of plastic bags.  It's like they are being worshiped.  We pray at the alter of the plastic bag.

 

That's dreadful. The USA certainly isn't leading the way on green issues as a whole nation that's for sure. You do wonder who is though to be perfectly honest. It doesn't seem to have made international news but there is a big public uproar in Germany as it's been discovered that the government has been colluding with all their car manufacturers hiding the truth about emissions. Then they criticise Trump for pulling out of climate change agreements.

Two faced or what?

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3 minutes ago, amybatt said:

 

@Dave Williams my eyes were opened wide in Rwanda, which is, hands down, the cleanest country I've ever been to, from top to bottom, from capital city to volcano-side.  But they have the plastic bag ban AND the mandatory "cleaning day" once a month where everyone is required to clean up around their cities/towns for 3 hours.  Politicians included.  If that isn't a textbook case of "this can work if you just try", I don't know what is.  I saw so many citizens picking things up off the ground randomly, it was as if this mandatory effort has made them realize that if they don't pick it up now, someone will have to later.  If only our first world countries could take a page out of this book.  (I also appreciate their car-free days, where everyone walks or bikes or just stays home for a half-day rather than pollute with vehicles)

 

The Gambia does something similar but I'm not sure how effective it is. Still rubbish in many places but not a patch on India which is absolutely awful.

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Just now, Dave Williams said:

 

That's dreadful. The USA certainly isn't leading the way on green issues as a whole nation that's for sure. Worse than just not leading, we're now cheerleaders for climate change deniers and polluters.  But some individual states (unfortunately not mine) and businesses are bucking the trend from the top and continuing to pursue green measures that also $ave them $$$$!  You do wonder who is though to be perfectly honest. It doesn't seem to have made international news but there is a big public uproar in Germany as it's been discovered that the government has been colluding with all their car manufacturers hiding the truth about emissions. This was an uproar in the US with huge lawsuits against Volkswagen. Then they criticise Trump for pulling out of climate change agreements.

Two faced or what?  There's one thing our species has perfected and it is hypocrisy.

 

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Interesting discussion.  It's no better in Canada.  Places have tried to ban the bags, but if it isn't done everywhere, the ban fails.  Stores have even tried charging per plastic bag needed.  But they stop because other stores don't follow suit.

 

Personally I hate the bags, but keep a few on hand for travel (laundry, to put shoes in).  I have a whole bunch of reusable bags I keep in my car for groceries.

 

 

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