Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
COSMIC RHINO

What does trophy hunting contribute to wild lion conservation?

3 posts in this topic

a whole lot of things are unknown  including what would happen to hunting lands if hunting ceased 

 

 

please  see   open access

 

  1. David W. Macdonald, Andrew J. Loveridge, Amy Dickman, Paul J. Johnson, Kim S. Jacobsen, Byron Du Preez. Lions, trophy hunting and beyond: knowledge gaps and why they matter. Mammal Review, 2017; DOI: 10.1111/mam.12096

:

Wiley. "What does trophy hunting contribute to wild lion conservation?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 July 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170731091049.htm
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here is one of the major references  useddsay

 

Nov 28, 2016 - Report on Lion Conservation with Particular Respect to the Issue of. Trophy Hunting. A report prepared by Professor David W. Macdonald CBE, ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@cosmic rhino;

 

I have read the Mammal Review paper by Macdonald et al to which you link.  It discusses all the obvious factors that may impact badly on lions and it is generally anodyne.  However, as is reasonable and to be expected, the authors make great play of the fact that there remain many unknowns.  A cynical wildlife manager might well take the view that this is a typical plea by researchers for more funding so that they can continue doing the things they enjoy doing rather than getting on with practical solutions - an investigative rather than problem solving approach. (Patients would suffer much more if their doctors awaited complete knowledge of a particular syndrome before attempting treatment.  Nevertheless, acquisition of further knowledge is likely to be beneficial in the long run. If funding is likely to be inadequate or limited, one must ask how it should be divided between research and treatment.)  That said, their discussion is well referenced and comprehensive.

 

I became uneasy when I read the authors' comments in the final "Ethics and Hindsight" Section.  By this stage, rather than considering the total picture, they appeared to focus entirely upon the pros and cons of "trophy hunting", giving the impression, belied in their earlier sections, that this was possibly the main factor determining lion conservation.  They went on to state that not all conservationists agreed that a utilitarian perspective on "trophy hunting" is the right one and even questioned whether sustainability was a criterion of good management, stating it to be ethically questionable when "applied to lion hunting (or to any killing of animals for "sport").  I began to wonder, at this stage, how they were defining the term, "conservationist".  Were they including the full range of those who might describe themselves as such from full-blown bunny-hugging animal rightists through to wildlife professionals?  It is apparent that WildCRU has benefited greatly from mining funds from the former and it is reasonable, therefore, to question their objectivity.  When the authors make the statement that "it is clear, though, that, if lion hunters aspire to be tolerated, they must demonstrate radical reform (and that may not be enough)",  they are hardly demonstrating impartiality. Clearly, lion hunting should be sustainable and all causes of lion deaths are likely to be additive.  Nevertheless, by focusing on possibly the least important factor in the declining population, one is showing evidence of cognitive bias.  In my experience, reform with the intention of pacifying the animal rights lobby will never satisfy it and will inevitably lead to total defeat.  Nevertherless, not all "protectionists" have strong animal rights beliefs and many have reached their positions because they believe that their views are compatible with or even necessary for good conservation.  It is incumbent upon those who believe that sustainable use offers the best hope for African wildlife to attempt to convert reasonable "protectionists" to their point of view while accepting that they will always be damned by genuine animal rightists.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


© 2006 - 2017 www.safaritalk.net - Talking Safaris and African Wildlife Conservation since 2006. Passionate about Africa.