xyz99

Peru Aug/Sept 2018

45 posts in this topic

@lmonmm, that was my original thought too - put Cusco in between, as it seems all departures to Manu are early in the morning from Cusco. We'll need to see how all the logistics fit into place and decide then. No Spanish speakers here :(

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Posted (edited)

@xyz99 I'd say Cusco can just about be seen in a day, Sacsayhuaman isn't to be missed but there are many others and you're probably best having 2 nights there to make best use of time. 2 days in the Sacred Valley is the minimum as there is so much to see there.

 

Weather in September was great, we had no rain the whole 2 weeks and most of the time it was T-shirt with a light sweater/jacket for when it got cloudy & in the evenings, ideal for wandering round.

 

As others have said, the potential for an adverse reaction to the altitude shouldn't be underestimated though, we flew into Cusco from Lima (OK, the worst way to do it) and our first afternoon was pretty much a write-off due to altitude sickness.  Both my wife & I had really thick/woosy heads that first afternoon & were just wandering aimlessly, unable to concentrate on doing much more than putting one foot in from of the other!! After a nights sleep I was fine but my wife continued to suffer until she started taking Diamox tablets and was generally OK after that, including up at Lake Titicaca (3,800m, 12,500ft), the highest point on our trip was 4,100m but that was towards the end of the trip as we were heading towards Arequipa so were well acclimatised by then.

Edited by AfricIan
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@xyz99 now that I think about it, we did MP from Ollantaytambo which together with MP is at a lower altitude than Cusco. Our guide walked us slowly around a few of the sights in Cusco before deciding that we wouldn't have any problems with high altitude. I enjoyed Cusco and would recommend at least a one night stay unless you have problems with altitude sickness. 

 

We stayed at Manu Wildlife Center in 2013 and would recommend it as a comfortable place with very good food. However, I would be having a close look at the new Manu Birding Lodge before deciding between the 2. The maps on this link show the relative locations of the Manu Lodges, and there was another place near Cocha Blanco and Cocha Camungo, however I can't remember the name right now. Peru Birding Tours may be a viable alternative to Manu Expeditions and Inkanatura for booking these lodges. Cesar Bollaty was out guide tin 2010 and I would highly recommend him for his exceptional knowledge of all living things in Manu, his gentle nature and good-humoured company.

 

Have fun with all the planning!

 

 

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Peru is amazing!

 

My 2c worth - spend as little time as possible in Lima!  We loved Cusco but didn't stay in the Sacred Valley so can't compare.

 

Gosh, the new restrictions around MP are tough.  I just checked and we spent nearly 10hrs there.  Be warned that it can sometimes take a while for the cloud to clear off in the morning - but it was so spectacular being slowly revealed, then hidden, then revealed again . . . It's an enormous site so 6hrs would just fly past.  We spent one night in Aguas Caliente, headed up MP for the 6am opening, back down at 4pm to be on the 6pm train, then bus back to Cusco.  Back to our hostel at midnight - shattered!

 

Manu was amazing but it's not easy travelling - a lot of time in vehicles and then canoes.  There were definitely a lot of hours of being hot & rather uncomfortable where nothing much happened but then boom!  Something amazing.  I had my ebook in a plastic bag and did a lot of reading on the river.  

 

Some of the highlights:

Cock of the Rock, grey breasted mountain toucan, golden headed quetzals (very distantly), ornate hawk eagle, parakeets, parrots, macaws, Greater Potoo.  Wooly monkeys, brown capuchin monkeys, howler monkeys, saddleback tamarin, squirrel monkeys, spider monkeys, white faced capuchins, night monkeys.  Giant river otters, capybara, peccaries, gorgeous butterflies & moths, turtles, caiman, bats in the eves of the "cabins."  The night walks were wonderful - all sorts of creepy crawlies including scorpion-spiders, the one & only snake & a vast array of beautiful frogs.  Others in our party saw an ocelot.

 

If we were to do it again we'd be much fussier about guides and group size - the first part was great with just four people and a really passionate guide who was right into birds.  The second part was with a much bigger group which was a nuisance at times (though lots of fun at dinner!)  Ideally you'd spend more time in Manu NP itself, but the sheer distances involved makes this pretty challenging, unless they've started flying in and out.

 

If you don't have time to get right into the NP, the lodges we stayed in on the outskirts were pretty good for sightings - we especially enjoyed Pantiacolla and Blanquillo - but this was back in 2012 so I"m sure a lot has changed.

 

Aww man, this has started me rereading our blog and I'm on to Colca Canyon and I just want to go back!

 

 

 

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1)      Is it true that Tambopata/Manu is similar to Pantanal? 

Pantanal has the most abundant wildlife, but not the clay licks for the flocks of red and green macaws.  Manu is more remote and takes more time/effort to get there of the spots listed. The cock-of-the-rock is by far most likely in Manu.  If you go to the right places, jaguars are much more likely in Pantanal.

2)      If yes, is 5 nights enough for Amazon? Land or boat in Aug/Sept?

That’s a good amount of time for Tambopata, Manu, or Pantanal.  I would say that’s the minimum I’d do.

3)      If not, which one: Tambopata or Manu? As these are in the general area where we'll be. We don't need luxury, but definitely private bathrooms and hot water.

http://safaritalk.net/topic/13705-manu-national-park-and-biosphere-reserve-in-peru-october/

Posts #14 and #15 detail differences

Both were great.  But there are some differences.

 

4)      Another thought is to try to see spectacle bears - where? how?

For @Treepol

5)      Logistically, is there a better way to organize the order of destinations of this trip?

I structured my trip similarly, with the Tambopata part at the end.  Used a guide for first day of MP, then on my own with the early arrival and Sun Gate the next day, hanging around until afternoon.  I wanted 2 days in case one day was rainy or very cloudy.  More time = better odds of good weather conditions. Aug-Sept is drier than most times.  My Aug trip had 0 rain.  I saw references to new rules in this thread.  At least from the top of MP, even when there were lots of people roaming around, it did not distract from the structures and lush green environment, which overpowered the tiny bodies below.  Again, from a distance, you can hardly even make out the people except for some bright clothes.

6) Any guide recommendation?

  I loved my InkaNatura guides.  I did not book directly with them because I had been told it was better to use an agent.  My experience definitely confirmed this along with the experience of another person or two.  Twice I used Green Tracks in the USA, who worked with InkaNatura.  Because InkaNatura publishes prices, it was the same cost.  For most of Manu, I used Manu Expeditions and booked directly with them. The guide and trip were outstanding.  The communication and booking part was not at all.  But it all worked out well in the end.  Manu Expeditions, InkaNatura, and Green Tracks will all do private trips.  About 10% of all the Peru travel I did was private.

single organizer for the entire trip (not a group though), or several, one for each area? 

On one trip I did all InkaNatura, booked through Green Tracks and the other trip both InkaNatura booked through Green Tracks and Manu Expeditions.  Either works.  You can see if you get a price break staying with one company.

 

Have fun planning and traveling in Peru!

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On 7/11/2017 at 4:52 AM, AfricIan said:

@xyz99 I'd say Cusco can just about be seen in a day, Sacsayhuaman isn't to be missed but there are many others and you're probably best having 2 nights there to make best use of time. 2 days in the Sacred Valley is the minimum as there is so much to see there.

 

Weather in September was great, we had no rain the whole 2 weeks and most of the time it was T-shirt with a light sweater/jacket for when it got cloudy & in the evenings, ideal for wandering round.

 

As others have said, the potential for an adverse reaction to the altitude shouldn't be underestimated though, we flew into Cusco from Lima (OK, the worst way to do it) and our first afternoon was pretty much a write-off due to altitude sickness.  Both my wife & I had really thick/woosy heads that first afternoon & were just wandering aimlessly, unable to concentrate on doing much more than putting one foot in from of the other!! After a nights sleep I was fine but my wife continued to suffer until she started taking Diamox tablets and was generally OK after that, including up at Lake Titicaca (3,800m, 12,500ft), the highest point on our trip was 4,100m but that was towards the end of the trip as we were heading towards Arequipa so were well acclimatised by then.

 

@AfricIan, I think the plan as of now is 3 nights for Sacred Valley...and maybe we'll try 2 in Cusco after that, after we're acclimatized to the altitude. Also, getting to Manu from Cusco is easier than from other towns. 

Diamox...I'll make sure to talk to my doctor about it, thanks.

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On 7/11/2017 at 5:56 AM, Treepol said:

@xyz99 now that I think about it, we did MP from Ollantaytambo which together with MP is at a lower altitude than Cusco. Our guide walked us slowly around a few of the sights in Cusco before deciding that we wouldn't have any problems with high altitude. I enjoyed Cusco and would recommend at least a one night stay unless you have problems with altitude sickness. 

 

We stayed at Manu Wildlife Center in 2013 and would recommend it as a comfortable place with very good food. However, I would be having a close look at the new Manu Birding Lodge before deciding between the 2. The maps on this link show the relative locations of the Manu Lodges, and there was another place near Cocha Blanco and Cocha Camungo, however I can't remember the name right now. Peru Birding Tours may be a viable alternative to Manu Expeditions and Inkanatura for booking these lodges. Cesar Bollaty was out guide tin 2010 and I would highly recommend him for his exceptional knowledge of all living things in Manu, his gentle nature and good-humoured company.

 

Have fun with all the planning!

 

 

@Treepol, another vote for Cusco then...we will try to stay there for a couple of nights, and hope for the best. With Diamox and coca tea we should be fine :)

As always, great links and maps, thank you! The Manu lodge is still TBD - I think we're sure it's going to be Manu, but not decided yet which lodge. Manu Wildlife Center, Manu Birding Lodge, Pantiacolla...I think these are the 3 we are considering.

 

We are also considering a couple of nights in Aguas Caliente at the Inkaterra hotel and try their morning birding tour. Not sure how to fit that in though...as we would need an early morning for the birds and an early morning for MP. Maybe 3 nights there? Seems too long...decisions....decisions....

 

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I went to Cusco in 2014.  I really enjoyed it and certainly preferred it to Lima.  It's best to spend an easy day there to acclimatize.   I took diomox with me but didn't bother with it in the end.  I was afraid I'd have to use the bathroom too much since it's a diuretic.  I kept hydrated  and paced myself and didn't have any issues I'm the end.

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15 hours ago, Feliz said:

Peru is amazing!

 

My 2c worth - spend as little time as possible in Lima!  We loved Cusco but didn't stay in the Sacred Valley so can't compare.

 

Gosh, the new restrictions around MP are tough.  I just checked and we spent nearly 10hrs there.  Be warned that it can sometimes take a while for the cloud to clear off in the morning - but it was so spectacular being slowly revealed, then hidden, then revealed again . . . It's an enormous site so 6hrs would just fly past.  We spent one night in Aguas Caliente, headed up MP for the 6am opening, back down at 4pm to be on the 6pm train, then bus back to Cusco.  Back to our hostel at midnight - shattered!

 

Manu was amazing but it's not easy travelling - a lot of time in vehicles and then canoes.  There were definitely a lot of hours of being hot & rather uncomfortable where nothing much happened but then boom!  Something amazing.  I had my ebook in a plastic bag and did a lot of reading on the river.  

 

Some of the highlights:

Cock of the Rock, grey breasted mountain toucan, golden headed quetzals (very distantly), ornate hawk eagle, parakeets, parrots, macaws, Greater Potoo.  Wooly monkeys, brown capuchin monkeys, howler monkeys, saddleback tamarin, squirrel monkeys, spider monkeys, white faced capuchins, night monkeys.  Giant river otters, capybara, peccaries, gorgeous butterflies & moths, turtles, caiman, bats in the eves of the "cabins."  The night walks were wonderful - all sorts of creepy crawlies including scorpion-spiders, the one & only snake & a vast array of beautiful frogs.  Others in our party saw an ocelot.

 

If we were to do it again we'd be much fussier about guides and group size - the first part was great with just four people and a really passionate guide who was right into birds.  The second part was with a much bigger group which was a nuisance at times (though lots of fun at dinner!)  Ideally you'd spend more time in Manu NP itself, but the sheer distances involved makes this pretty challenging, unless they've started flying in and out.

 

If you don't have time to get right into the NP, the lodges we stayed in on the outskirts were pretty good for sightings - we especially enjoyed Pantiacolla and Blanquillo - but this was back in 2012 so I"m sure a lot has changed.

 

Aww man, this has started me rereading our blog and I'm on to Colca Canyon and I just want to go back!

 

 

 

@Feliz, your Manu highlights are fantastic!!! What a diversity, wow! Hope we will be as lucky as you were, especially when it comes to monkeys. And the ocelot :) And the birds :)

We'll see if we ca do a private guide (financially), as that seems to be the best option for wildlife. 

 

Colca Canyon...that will definitely be a destination on out 2nd Peru trip. See? Already planning a return...

 

 

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9 hours ago, Atravelynn said:

1)      Is it true that Tambopata/Manu is similar to Pantanal? 

 

Pantanal has the most abundant wildlife, but not the clay licks for the flocks of red and green macaws.  Manu is more remote and takes more time/effort to get there of the spots listed. The cock-of-the-rock is by far most likely in Manu.  If you go to the right places, jaguars are much more likely in Pantanal.

 

2)      If yes, is 5 nights enough for Amazon? Land or boat in Aug/Sept?

 

That’s a good amount of time for Tambopata, Manu, or Pantanal.  I would say that’s the minimum I’d do.

 

3)      If not, which one: Tambopata or Manu? As these are in the general area where we'll be. We don't need luxury, but definitely private bathrooms and hot water.

 

http://safaritalk.net/topic/13705-manu-national-park-and-biosphere-reserve-in-peru-october/

 

Posts #14 and #15 detail differences

 

Both were great.  But there are some differences.

 

 

 

4)      Another thought is to try to see spectacle bears - where? how?

 

For @Treepol

 

5)      Logistically, is there a better way to organize the order of destinations of this trip?

 

I structured my trip similarly, with the Tambopata part at the end.  Used a guide for first day of MP, then on my own with the early arrival and Sun Gate the next day, hanging around until afternoon.  I wanted 2 days in case one day was rainy or very cloudy.  More time = better odds of good weather conditions. Aug-Sept is drier than most times.  My Aug trip had 0 rain.  I saw references to new rules in this thread.  At least from the top of MP, even when there were lots of people roaming around, it did not distract from the structures and lush green environment, which overpowered the tiny bodies below.  Again, from a distance, you can hardly even make out the people except for some bright clothes.

 

6) Any guide recommendation?

 

  I loved my InkaNatura guides.  I did not book directly with them because I had been told it was better to use an agent.  My experience definitely confirmed this along with the experience of another person or two.  Twice I used Green Tracks in the USA, who worked with InkaNatura.  Because InkaNatura publishes prices, it was the same cost.  For most of Manu, I used Manu Expeditions and booked directly with them. The guide and trip were outstanding.  The communication and booking part was not at all.  But it all worked out well in the end.  Manu Expeditions, InkaNatura, and Green Tracks will all do private trips.  About 10% of all the Peru travel I did was private.

 

 

single organizer for the entire trip (not a group though), or several, one for each area? 

On one trip I did all InkaNatura, booked through Green Tracks and the other trip both InkaNatura booked through Green Tracks and Manu Expeditions.  Either works.  You can see if you get a price break staying with one company.

 

Have fun planning and traveling in Peru!

@Atravelynn, your organization skills left me speechless. Love your spreadsheet and I will study it in great detail. So much info there, thank you!!!

 

I think the Inkaterra hotel in Aguas Caliente has a short spectacled bears tour (not wild, but hopefully not caged - I'll need to read more about it).

 

About MP and the 2 days suggestion...did you buy tickets for 2 days? With the new rules, should we do 2 mornings? Or 1 morning and 1 afternoon?

 

InkaNaturra did not respond to my emails, but I'll wait and also contact GreenTracks and Manu Expeditions and see if we can get a private guide in Manu (and the cost of it). Did you do MP and Sacred Valley with them too? Or just the Manu portion? I so wish we could stretch this trip longer, but 2 weeks is all we can manage. 

 

The thing that surprised me about Peru (not in a good way, and it has nothing to do with Peru itself) is how inconvenient all flights are, at least from the east coast. It's either a non-stop to Lima that gets there at 9 pm, so you need to spend a night in Lima, then fly to Cusco next day, or with 2 stops as an overnight flight to Cusco. Coming back home is not easier...

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32 minutes ago, Tulips said:

I went to Cusco in 2014.  I really enjoyed it and certainly preferred it to Lima.  It's best to spend an easy day there to acclimatize.   I took diomox with me but didn't bother with it in the end.  I was afraid I'd have to use the bathroom too much since it's a diuretic.  I kept hydrated  and paced myself and didn't have any issues I'm the end.

 

@Tulips Interesting, I did not realize Diamox is a diuretic. How are the bathrooms in Peru? How easy is to find one when you need one? I read you ned to carry TP, because most of them don't have any, but are they clean?

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1 hour ago, xyz99 said:

@Atravelynn, your organization skills left me speechless. Love your spreadsheet and I will study it in great detail. So much info there, thank you!!!

 

I think the Inkaterra hotel in Aguas Caliente has a short spectacled bears tour (not wild, but hopefully not caged - I'll need to read more about it).

 

About MP and the 2 days suggestion...did you buy tickets for 2 days? With the new rules, should we do 2 mornings? Or 1 morning and 1 afternoon?  Yes, I had tickets for 2 days.  I'd do 2 mornings.  Though the afternoon was pleasant.  But I think light, lower #s of people and cooler temps give mornings the edge.

 

InkaNaturra did not respond to my emails, but I'll wait and also contact GreenTracks and Manu Expeditions and see if we can get a private guide in Manu (and the cost of it). Did you do MP and Sacred Valley with them too?  I did Cuzco and Sacred Valley with the same InkaNatura guide (Humberto) as MP all booked through Green Tracks.  Or just the Manu portion? On a different trip, I went over the Andes to Cock-of-the-Rock Lodge in Manu on a 2-day trip with Guide William of InkaNatura, booked through Green Tracks.  so wish we could stretch this trip longer, but 2 weeks is all we can manage. 

 

The thing that surprised me about Peru (not in a good way, and it has nothing to do with Peru itself) is how inconvenient all flights are, at least from the east coast. It's either a non-stop to Lima that gets there at 9 pm, so you need to spend a night in Lima, then fly to Cusco next day, or with 2 stops as an overnight flight to Cusco. Coming back home is not easier...

Your comment about weird times is what I recall.  I have memories of sleeping in the Lima airport at very early hours and wearing my wool hat because it was cold.   I was not alone in my attire.

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Yes, @xyz99, Diamox is a diuretic but I don't think it's a particularly powerful one. If you don't like the idea of taking a diuretic then you could always try Viagra instead, it's also meant to be quite an effective anti altitude sickness medication ;)

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31 minutes ago, AfricIan said:

Yes, @xyz99, Diamox is a diuretic but I don't think it's a particularly powerful one. If you don't like the idea of taking a diuretic then you could always try Viagra instead, it's also meant to be quite an effective anti altitude sickness medication ;)

 

LOL, I had no idea. For some reason I find that very funny and I wonder if insurances cover it for this :)

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On 2017-07-13 at 10:44 PM, xyz99 said:

 

@Tulips Interesting, I did not realize Diamox is a diuretic. How are the bathrooms in Peru? How easy is to find one when you need one? I read you ned to carry TP, because most of them don't have any, but are they clean?

I didn't carry toilet paper and bathrooms were available although at Machu Pichu, you would have to go to the entrance to find them.

 

It was incredibly hot when I went so I found my body was sucking up the water rather than it going through me.  I also have an aversion to public washrooms so try to avoid as much as possible.  There were no disgusting bathrooms that I experienced.

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@Tulips, good to know, thanks a lot!

I guess I'll have to see if with the new rules at MP they let you get out to use the bathroom, then back in. There must be a way...

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Posted (edited)

@xyz99

 

Sorry for my delay in responding. We were out of town. 😃

 

Our trip to Peru in 2014 centered on Tambopata and Machu Picchu. I have not been to Manu (would love to go someday) or to the Amazon proper (Iquitos). 

 

A number of thoughts and impressions, in no particular order:

 

1.  With limited time, accessing wildlife from Puerto Maldonado served us well because LAN (now LATAM) had numerous daily flights between Lima-Cusco-Puerto Maldonado. The segment between Cusco and Puerto Maldonado is short, like 45 minutes, and this schedule is a real time-saver when you are trying to combine wildlife and Machu Picchu/Sacred Valley   On our "transfer" day, we went from a morning hike on a trail in Tambopata to lunch in Cusco to dinner and drinks in the Sacred Valley seamlessly. 

 

2.  The flight schedules into and out of Lima are very weird, but we actually worked it to our advantage. There is a hotel directly across from the airport that you can easily walk to by skybridge (Ramada Costa del Sol) with a surprisingly good restaurant. It was really nice to just walk over there after going through immigration for decent food, a shower and some sleep and then starting our trip in earnest the next day. On your return home, you should be able to get back to Lima and your connecting international flight in the evening without having to spend another night in Lima. 

 

3. Personally, I highly recommend doing the wildlife portion of the trip first. Whether you go north to Iquitos or south to Manu or Tambopata, it will be hot and sticky. It was sooooo refreshing to go from a week in the rainforest to the cool mountain air of Cusco/Sacred Valley/Machu Picchu. It also gave us time to get daily cups of coca tea and our altitude sickness medication into our system. We had immediately felt the effects of the altitude in Cusco when our flight to Puerto Maldonado stopped there, but when we returned a week later for the second portion of our trip, we were fine and never had any troubles. 

 

4. Tambopata (and I suspect Manu and the Amazon areas in the north) are nothing like the Pantanal. Best comparison to Tambopata I can come up with for you: imagine Bosque del Cabo's landscape, but relatively flat (after you climb up the riverbank) and just as humid, if not more so -- and, at least downriver at the Research Center, much more remote. And obviously no deck overlooking the Pacific!  Wildlife was more abundant and much easier to see in the Pantanal. So glad to hear you are going there. 

 

5. Best memory of Tambopata: the night walks. The jungle transforms, with frogs and insects and night monkeys all coming out, and we had 1 1/2 hours each night to explore this world with nothing but our guide and our flashlights and headlamps. I've never experienced anything like it since. With all due respect to Philip at Bosque del Cabo, the night walk he leads around the lodge there is nothing like actually being on the trail in the jungle at night, and due to the flat terrain at Tambopata, it's relatively easy. 

 

6. Definitely spend two nights in Aguas Calientes. Machu Picchu is spectacular. Why go all that way and then not savor your time there?  The Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo in Aguas Calientes was an expensive indulgence that was worth every penny. They also have a spectacled bear rehabilitation program where they are taking captive bears and slowly reintroducing them to the wilderness in Machu Picchu National Park. It takes real luck to see one that has been fully reacclimated to the wild, but you will definitely see bears in a wild (albeit controlled) setting. 

 

7. Cusco is an amazing and unforgettable historic city. We were really glad we devoted two nights to our stay there. 

 

Well, hope that's a start. Let me know if you have any questions. (I'm now aching to go back to Peru!)

Edited by Alexander33

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@Alexander33, wow, this is great info, thank you!!!

 

Interesting take about doing the jungle firsts, and I understand why. I guess in the end logistics will dictate the order, but this order might work even better. Glad to hear that we don't need to spend a day/night in Lima at the end of the trip, as I'm trying to maximize the time in the other areas. Yes, the flight back is late at night, 10pm or so, so we can travel from Cusco to Lima that day.

 

For now I think we'll try to get to Manu...we have 15 nights in Peru all together, and I'm thinking 3 in Sacred Valley (Ollantaytmbo?), 2 in Aguas Caliente, 2 in Cusco - this leaves 8 for Manu: 2 at the Cock of the Rock Lodge and 6 somewhere else, or 3 + 3 somewhere else... still need to refine these thoughts.

 

Thanks for Ramada Costa del Sol recommendation. Somebody on flyertalk mentioned that you need ear plugs...is it that loud? I guess it's the proximity to the airport.

 

Anything that remotely compares to Bosque del Cabo automatically gets my vote. Yes, the view was a major attraction, we stayed in Congo, but the wildlife was THE thing there. I've tried other places hoping to find something similar, and I'm still looking. 

 

Will keep an eye on the night walks, I wonder if all lodges offer them...need to keep in mind and ask.

 

I'm getting more and more excited about this trip. It's really the 3rd time we're planning it, but this time will happen. 

 

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@xyz99

 

That sounds like a great underlying itinerary.

 

Ha!  You brought back some memories, as, now that you mention it, the Ramada Costa del Sol was very loud, but not because of the planes. It was the damn car alarms going off continuously throughout the night, and not because they were being broken into. Maybe the sound waves from the jets were setting them off, but, whatever the cause, they were incredibly annoying -- all the same brand, the ones that cycle through different types of noises over and over again, so, yes, earplugs might not be a bad idea.....

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@Alexander33

 

Ha-ha, those car alarms....sounds like my neighbors....but that doesn't mean I'm used to it :)

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