Tom Kellie

Fossil Frogs in Western South Africa Reflect Historic Rainfall Changes

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http://www.sajs.co.za/implications-summer-breeding-frogs-langebaanweg-south-africa-regional-climate-evolution-5-1-mya/thalassa-matthews-g-john-measey-david-l-roberts

 

https://phys.org/news/2017-06-frog-fossils-patterns-south-africa.html

 

https://theconversation.com/frog-fossils-tell-us-something-new-about-rain-patterns-on-south-africas-west-coast-78420

 

~ This September, 2016 research article published in the South African Journal of Science presents findings of a study of fossil frog species, including analysis of the history of winter rainfall in the arid west coast of South Africa.

 

 

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The west Coast fossils are very interesting - and they are just starting to see what there is - who knows what else will be unearthed  (excuse the pun) 

I visited some excavations last year. Loved it! 

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6 minutes ago, Elsa Hoffmann said:

The west Coast fossils are very interesting - and they are just starting to see what there is - who knows what else will be unearthed  (excuse the pun) 

I visited some excavations last year. Loved it! 

 

~ @Elsa Hoffmann

 

Wow! You were on-site where these ongoing fossil dig is occurring.

 

That's cool! The research article and the explanatory articles noted that large ungulates were also found.

 

Apparently it's an exceptionally well-preserved fossil trove — another of South Africa's under-appreciated treasures.

 

I trust that no one was snacking on “pofadder” while you were visiting the site!

 

Tom K.

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@Tom Kellie the West Coast Fossil Park is open for visits (not all areas) and it is a working site. Local people are employed to sit day in a day out - sifting thru the "sand" and identify little bones that I you would NEVER guess belonged to a frog, reptile or bird. (see the trays) They are in the process of establishing a conference centre and other facilities at the site, and making it a bigger attraction for visitors. The site was discovered so recently (when building there was planned) - they really have no clue what is waiting - its like a giant dump yard - probably the bones drifted together in a mud slide or similar - a natural thing to happen over millions of years, due to the topography of the area. I seem to recall the University of Cape Town is kind of in charge with the research and I imagine a couple of PHD's will follow as a result. 

160130 West Coast Tour 093.jpg

160130 West Coast Tour 094.jpg

160130 West Coast Tour 097s.jpg

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~ @Elsa Hoffmann

 

You've brought life to this research article with this terrific on-the-scene images!

 

The explanation which you've so kindly offered puts it all in perspective. 

 

The photos are ideal, taking a fairly dry subject and adding interest through bringing out the sense of the site.

 

This is so compelling that I'll show it in classes tomorrow.

 

It's the final week of instruction here. I'm teaching for six hours tomorrow, students who'd benefit from seeing how patience and care yield results.

 

You're burnishing South Africa's luster, Elsa.

 

Many, many thanks!

 

Tom K.

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@Tom Kellie anyway - you are welcome - the ONLY reason (in my opinion) for taking photos is that others can look at them. Wish I had more of the fossil farm! 

 

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