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Tom Kellie

Behavioral Energetics of African Leopards — A Detailed Study

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http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ecs2.1850/full

 

https://news.ucsc.edu/2017/06/wilmers-leopard.html

 

~ This June, 2017 research article published in Ecosphere, a well as the explanatory news release from the U.C. Santa Cruz News Center, presents findings of a study of African Leopards at the Mpala Research Centre in Laikipia, Kenya.

 

Leopard energetics including determining caloric demand were measured for five leopards wearing collars equipped with both GPS and accelerometer devices. Energy expenditure while hunting, predatory drive and interaction with the ecosystem were assessed.

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@Tom Kellie,

 

It seems you have cited a perfect example of interesting academic research that affords little of use to wildlife managers.  The results, dressed in fancy language, were entirely in line with those that could have been predicted by any competent nutritionist without ever having done the field work (based on basic theory).  Mpala provides a base for visiting researchers. Perhaps the exercise was planned to give a research student practice or a more senior researcher a cheap holiday.

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7 minutes ago, douglaswise said:

Perhaps the exercise was planned to give a research student practice or a more senior researcher a cheap holiday.

 

~ @douglaswise

 

Or both?

 

When I read the article, the thought occurred to me that using their methodology, a field study of energetics that I would like to read would be concentrating on any of the dormouse species.

 

While their range is small, and there'd be limited practical benefit, I've understood that there peregrinations are remarkable, for the sheer frenetic energy of going up and down, back and forth, over any under.

 

That may be why they hibernate, to recover from their pell-mell activity.

 

As has been noted elsewhere, scarce research funds might best be devoted to habitat preservation, rather than satisfying my idle interest in the lives of dormice.

 

Tom K.

 

 

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