jeremie

China's new protected areas network model

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China is working to establish a new model of national park, with much higher standards that the current protected areas of the Chinese nation.

 

The first national park would be Sanjiangyuan, one huge area located in Northern Tibet that would protect about a thousand of snow leopards, tibetan antilopes, wild yaks. The area is currently protected as a nature reserve. It is one site where the Panthera NGO is working to conserve the mighty cat.

 

I have been really close to the area in 2011, I saw huge herds of chiru and tibetan gazelles, tibetan foxes and tibetan wolves.

 

 

 

 

  • Sanjiangyuan National Park is expected to open in 2020 as China’s first park in its new national park system.
  • As many as 1,500 endangered snow leopards (Panthera uncia) live in the area. The cats are subject to poaching and persecution in retaliation for their predation on livestock, which are edging out their natural prey.
  • The new park seeks to capitalize on the reverence many local Tibetan Buddhists have for wildlife, employing a conservation model that engages the public and attempts to ease tensions between people and predators.
  • The new national park system is intended to create a more effective kind of protected area than currently exists in China.

 

https://news.mongabay.com/2017/05/chinas-first-national-park-an-experiment-in-living-with-snow-leopards/

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thanks for sharing a rare positive story about China's wildlife!

 

You've been there before - how did you go about organising it? Are there wildlife guides or nature treks organised for this area and is this a difficult place to visit and move around?

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Very interesting. Thanks @@jeremie

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Very interesting observation from a large number of Chiru's seen by @@jeremie. Their wool known as Shahtoosh (king of fine wool) is the name given to a particular type of highly valued shawl, reaching extremely high prices of $ 5,000 to 10,000 per unit, depending on the purity of the fabric, in the West and the Middle East Markets . A "commodity". Their possession and use is a symbol of power and prestige. Their commercialization is prohibited, an endangered species under CITES control.

 

Until a few years ago, many of the traffickers went unpunished because of the difficulty of 100% reliable recognition that the shawl contains Chiru fibers. The police "technique" used for identification consists of passing the Shawl through a wedding ring, however, this practice is not recognized in court. A test done in an overseas laboratory is necessary to prove and serve as a procedural test in the courts. Its number in the early twentieth century revolved around one million to less than 50,000 or 60,000 today.

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thanks for sharing a rare positive story about China's wildlife!

 

You've been there before - how did you go about organising it? Are there wildlife guides or nature treks organised for this area and is this a difficult place to visit and move around?

 

 

@Kitsafari:

 

I have traveled for a month and a half in 2012 in Central, Northern and Western Tibet. I did not focus on wildlife, rather on culture, history and landscapes.

I took the train from Xinning to Lhasa. You can see in the middle of the trip huge herds of gazelles and antelopes from the train. I have no picture of this part of the trip.

 

In Western Tibet, I saw another herd of chirus and a wolf no too far from the road, in the Kailash area.

 

10091930056_ced0598208_k.jpgTroupeau d'antilopes chiru proche du Gyantsu Tso, Ngari, Tibet by Goulevitch Jérémie, sur Flickr

 

8048153846_a0db8c5c93_k.jpgLoup du Tibet, Ngari, Tibet by Goulevitch Jérémie, sur Flickr

 

All the pictures of the trip are on my flickr account:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/40746420@N03/albums/72157631679644894/page1

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Posted (edited)

As with all Chinese P.R. statements (especially those concerning Tibet):

 

A. I can't help wonder at ulterior motives (perhaps an excuse to move Tibetans out of an area Chinese special interests covet).

 

and

 

B. I will believe this when facts on the ground indicate it's really true.

 

And I find the notion of Han Chinese helping Tibetans conserve wildlife / habitat somewhat upside-down. Kind of like Donald Trump helping Bhutan conserve wildlife / habitat.

 

And if the National Park is in Tibet, I consider it to be illegally occupied by Chinese invaders who by rights should not be calling the shots there anyway.

Edited by offshorebirder
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@offshorebirder

 

I really understand why you are pessimistic, it is true chinese have not done great things in Tibet until now, they are constantly destroying the Tibetan culture, exploiting the rich underground, building massive dams on the main tibetan rivers... The main geopolitics assets of Tibet, that is to say the Chinese nº1 reason for invading Tibet under Mao, was to take on the water castle of Asia, giving them the position of controlling the biggest rivers of South East Asia and the Indian sub-continent (apart from the Irrawaddy and the Ganga rivers).

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Hoping this is authentically good news.

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