kittykat23uk

Bornean Mammal Tour 2017 - A Quest For The Elusive Mammals of The Bornean Rainforest

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Our next night drive started fairly slowly with a sleeping prinia.

 

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P2271201 copy2 yellow-bellied prinia by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

A common palm civet was seen later on, and spent quite a while hunting on the ground darting in and around some deep ruts in the track. Unfortunately at that point in the drive my camera decided that the current battery was suddenly drained and that it didn't want to recognise the other two spares. I tried to clean the contacts as best I could and managed to coax the camera back to life. This sadly impacted on my ability to get decent shots of this little civet but I tried my best.

 

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P2271202adj copy Common (Island) palm civet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2271205adj copy Common (Island) palm civet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2271209adj copy Common (Island) palm civet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2271210adj2 Common (Island) palm civet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We passed back through camp and I picked up my other camera and lens and stuck one of the "dead" batteries on charge. Heading further our of camp we heard a very strange noise which we eventually tracked down to a flock of roosting Bushy-crested Hornbills

 

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P2271224 (2)adj Bushy crested hornbill by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Mike then spotted a pretty green vine snake, so we piled out of the truck to get a better view.

 

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P2271239 Green vine snake by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We then managed to track down some semi-cooperative elephants, and I finally got a couple of passable shots!

 

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P2271242 adj copy Bornean Pygmy Elephants by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2271244 adj 2 copy Bornean Pygmy Elephants by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Just as my eyelids were getting desperately heavy, we turned a blind corner and found eye-shine in front of us in the road. We could see straight away what it was - a Malay Stink Badger, (or Sunda Skunk, as it is apparently called now). It trotted from one side of the road to the other and back again, seemingly unsure of what to do.

 

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P2271250 Sunda skunk by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2271252 Sunda Skunk by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2271261 copy Sunda skunk by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We stopped and everyone got out to take pictures, the animal passing in front of the assembled photographers at ridiculously close range. (Mike told us afterwards that he was half expecting it to squirt us with its malodorous scent!). Then it finally disappeared into the undergrowth to our right. But it hadn't quite finished its performance and re-appeared on the road behind us. It could scarcely have been more obliging! Yet another "mammal of the trip". :D

 

 

With that sighting in the bag, it was time to hit the sack!

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Sweet dreams after a night like that. Your batteries may have been dying, but they clicked off some elusive mammal shots.

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Wow - the Stink Badger has an Aardvark-looking snout.

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You really saw a wonderful variety of creatures. Obviously, the marbled cat takes the cake, but there are so many other stand-outs to me.

 

Spotting a rarity is thrilling, but I'm finding myself getting excited over the common occurrences as well. Let's put it this way: Any place where one can see and get great shots of the buffy fish owl as often as you did, and label it as "common," is a place I'm apt to like.

 

You are helping to push Borneo to near the top of my short list. @@Atdahl, don't wait too long on that trip report. I usually find myself walking in your footsteps.

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"The first four nights had really produced only common species and we were starting to get a bit twitchy." Common but very impressive. Then the marbled cat! Look what sacrificing a beard can do.

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Thanks everyone, Jens got a lovely shot of the Badger which is in the PDF version of the report.

 

28/2 When we got back after seeing the Stink Badger we has a quick celebratory Rum substitute (a local spirit called Arrack)

 

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FB_IMG_1487725279466 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We were having no luck with our main target, the Clouded Leopard and drastic measures were called for, so Margarita decided to sacrifice the image of a Bay Cat in the hope that the leopard God would look favorably upon us.

 

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20170228_003613 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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20170228_003559 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

32441814674_795cbd21bd_c.jpg20170228_073717_008 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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20170228_073811_006 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2281277 Misty morning by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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20170228_074604 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We wanted to get some early morning scenic shots so took a drive out in the morning - it was also a good opportunity to check our camera traps. There hadn't been much activity.

 

We did find some pitcher plants though:

 

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P2281287 Pitcher plant by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2281301 Parthenos Sylvia - Clipper butterfly by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2281304 Pitcher plant by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2281307 Pitcher plant by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2281315 Pitcher plant by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

A little spiderhunter played peekaboo behind a bush near camp

 

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P2281334 Little spiderhunter by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2281339 dragonfly by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2281344 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

A frenetic green leafbird was flitting around between the trees..

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P2281358 Green leafbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

But a Bornean black magpie proved less cooperative.

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P2281368 copy Bornean black magpie by Jo Dale, on Flickr

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After a slow start it seemed that things were picking up. The evening got off to a good start with a Long-tailed Porcupine at very close range beside the road. It even had its full tail - many of its kind having often deliberately lost them in last ditch escapes from predators.

 

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P2281374 adj Long-tailed Porcupine by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2281370 Buffy fish owl by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We went looking for some flying frogs.

 

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P2281378 frog by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2281383 Harlequin flying frog by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2281385 Harlequin flying frog by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2281386 Harlequin flying frog by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P2281388 Harlequin flying frog by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

There had been torrential rain the previous night and all through the day and so everything was very wet and there were big roadside pools everywhere. It was at one of these pools that Mike again brought us to an abrupt halt. A few metres to our left we just had time to see two, possibly three, compact dark bundles of fur disappearing into the long grass. They squeaked as if they were juveniles and Mike called out "Civet", then "Otter".

Well, they didn't look much like either to us. What Civet is all dark with a short compact body? What Otter has a short tail? But we had misheard him. He was telling us that they were baby Otter Civets. Two of the animals briefly re-appeared a short distance away in the open revealing (very briefly) what seemed to be a flash of white around the mouth. Then they doubled back and hid behind a stand of grass only four metres from the vehicle.

We decided to wait them out. Surely they would either bolt or their mother would come to rescue them? We got out of the vehicle and stood in silence to await events. Mike crept around their starboard side and confirmed they were still present.

 

Then, a pair of orange eyes appeared ten metres away on the edge of the really thick stuff. The mother was returning. But she was nervous and wouldn't come closer. Still we waited but when we later checked to see if the babies were still hidden they were missing. They'd obviously slipped away to re-join their mum without us noticing. Jens and Margarita had some photographs, snatched in the seconds when the animals were slipping through the grass. None of them will win prizes but they were enough to confirm our identification. We had had a glimpse of two baby Otter Civets!

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1/3 In the morning I took a walk with Jens towards Domingo's management trail and the first sighting we had was of the same orangutan feeding once again by the generator. We spent some time enjoying his company before he finally moved off.

 

A plaintive cuckoo perched up briefly.

 

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P3015620 (2) copy Plaintive cuckoo by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3011406 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3011428 Dragonfly by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3011439 dragonfly by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3011451 flower and bee by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3011459 flower and bee by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

I photographed a few dragonflies and then we hiked Domingo's management trail spotting a troup of Sabah grey langaurs, who unfortunately didn't pose for photographs but their little pink faces and mohicans were so adorable!

 

I finally managed to see a trogon, but only briefly, as that had been pretty elusive this trip.

 

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P3011475 Scarlet rumped trogon by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

That evening we found Malaysian Moon Moth that flew into the restaurant.

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P3011495adj copy Malaysian Moon Moth by Jo Dale, on Flickr

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P3011512 Sunlit leaves by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

On our night drive we found another slow loris.

 

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P3011515adj copy Slow loris by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3011521 adj Slow Loris by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

A rather distant Barred Eagle Owl

 

 

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P3011546 adj Barred eagle owl by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

As well as common stuff such as Small toothed palm civet, Malay civet and Common palm civet, but it was generally quite quiet.

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Wow !! Spectacular moth ! I like your interest in little creatures.

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@@kittykat23uk your tenacity continued to pay off with great sightings of Bushy-crested hornbills, pygmy elephants, Sunda skunk and the Malay Porcupine. This surely must be one of the best safaris for little seen mammals and gorgeous birds.

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Thanks @@Treepol.

 

2/3 Margarita left today whilst the three of us stayed on for a final night. it was a misty start, but a large woodshrike perched up on one of the telegraph wires.

 

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P3021576 Large Wood Shrike by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

At the function room there were a pair of red-bearded bee eaters- a stunning bird which until that moment had not been very cooperative. Thankfully these beautiful birds showed very nicely whilst a group of Japanese tourists were taking breakfast and so I couldn't pass up the opportunity to join the bee eater paparazzi!

 

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P3021591 copy Red-bearded bee-eater by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021606 copy Red-bearded bee-eater by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021617 copy Red-bearded bee-eater by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021636adj2 copy Red-bearded bee-eater by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021649 copy Red-bearded bee-eater by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

The plaintive cuckoo was also being quite cooperative this morning and posed for me on this sign

 

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P3021687 copy Plaintive cuckoo by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

And the White-fronted Falconet (Bornean Falconet) allowed a close approach as it also perched up on the lines.

 

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P3021697 (2) Bornean falconet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021700 (2) Bornean falconet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021701 (2) Bornean falconet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Rhinoceros hornbills, stunning birds, were not as cooperative and sadly kept their distance compared to my last trip but they were seen flying over on occasion.

 

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P3021742 copy Rhino hornbill by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021770 Rhino hornbill by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021780 adj Chestnut breasted Malkoha by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We'd seen various Squirrels throughout the trip, the best of which was undoubtedly the somewhat rare Ear-spot Squirrel. This little gem appeared outside the kitchen in the afternoon as we were all lazing about in the restaurant. Mike came in and announced that there was a "Plantain Squirrel" outside. On closer inspection however it had the diagnostic white spot behind the ear. We then spent a very happy ten or fifteen minutes photographing it from every conceivable angle.

 

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P3021856adj copy Ear-spot Squirrel by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021928adj Ear-spot Squirrel by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021928 copy Ear-spot Squirrel by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021928adj copy Ear-spot Squirrel by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021948 copy Ear-spot Squirrel by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021967 Ear-spot Squirrel by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3021978adj Ear-spot Squirrel by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We took our final night drive in the desperate hope that this would deliver our much sought-after clouded leopard. Alas it was not to be and Margarita found that she could rest easy for not having missed out on "the big one" this time. We did find a pair of Malay Porcupines on the River Road on the last night, a nice way to finish the trip.

 

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P3025638 (2) adj Malayan porcupine by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We took the opportunity to photograph some of the other common species on our final drive.

 

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P3025644adj Bornean Flying Fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3025649adj Thomas's flying Squirrel by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3025666adj Small-toothed palm civer by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3025685adj Crested serpent eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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P3025686adj Crested serpent eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr

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@@kittykat23uk fabulous photos of the stunning Red-bearded bee-eaters!

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Great bird shots in that last series. The red-bearded bee eaters are spectacular, and the crested serpent eagle is lovely. Rhinoceros hornbill is a dream bird for me.

 

I've been meaning to ask, since you have so many night shots: A lot of them appear to be illuminated with just a flashlight (oh, sorry, "torch" ). Is that the case? If so, do you recall what strength it was? Just curious, because I'm about to give up on using even lower-powered fill flash at night unless it's absolutely essential -- I'm tired of the "devil eyes" I get in return.

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Great bird shots in that last series. The red-bearded bee eaters are spectacular, and the crested serpent eagle is lovely. Rhinoceros hornbill is a dream bird for me.

 

I've been meaning to ask, since you have so many night shots: A lot of them appear to be illuminated with just a flashlight (oh, sorry, "torch" ). Is that the case? If so, do you recall what strength it was? Just curious, because I'm about to give up on using even lower-powered fill flash at night unless it's absolutely essential -- I'm tired of the "devil eyes" I get in return.

That's exactly what I was going to ask and then I saw the question already posed. Your night shots are outstanding. That red bearded bee eater has ridiculously brilliant colors. The Rhinoceros hornbills put on a flying-in-formation show for you!

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Thanks both. The spotlight is powered by the car I believe. It's very powerful. I had to try and experiment between using flash and not. My flash often doesn't seem to work too well , it really is hit and miss to be honest. Obviously without flash your iso level is very high and pics very noisy as a result. Also the mist and rain are a big problem with flash, as is position in vehicle with risk of light bouncong off the vehicle and spoiling pics.

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3/2/17

So only a few hours left before we headed homewards. More chances to photograph the stunning red-bearded bee eater

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P3032001 adj Red-bearded bee eater by Jo Dale, on Flickr

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P3032043 adj Red-bearded bee eater by Jo Dale, on Flickr

Coucal

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P3032074 copy Greater Coucal by Jo Dale, on Flickr

Falconet

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P3032077 Bornean falconet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

Local flora

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P3032050 Lianas by Jo Dale, on Flickr

and some scenic shots


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20170303_075406 by Jo Dale, on Flickr


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20170303_075413 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

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20170303_075422 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

Outside of the reserve, things are not so rosy

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20170303_084558 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

The scourge of palm oil is everywhere

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20170303_093940 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

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20170303_094022 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

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20170303_094137 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

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20170303_094409 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

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20170303_100610 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

My Malaysian Airlines flight to Kota Kinabalu was rescheduled back by two hours. This meant that I had very little time to make my connection and I literally had to race round the airport to collect my bag and recheck it. When I got to the Royal Brunei bag drop I was told I was the last one to check in and that I should go straight to the gate as they planned to leave early! Nightmare!!

I couldn't even get a nice drink on the way home, but at least the first leg was empty enough that I could have a row to myself so I stretched out and got my head down for a while, until we reached Dubai.

Well that was the end of the trip, and we have had plenty of clouded skies but no Clouded Leopard unfortunately. Considering how frequently sightings have been coming out of Deramakot (and to a lesser extent Danum Valley) one could be easily fooled into thinking that a trip of this length with extensive night drives is almost guaranteed to deliver a Clouded Leopard. Indeed, there were sightings only two weeks before we arrived and further sightings about a week or two after we returned- and Mike's frequent Facebook updates have continued to provide additional frustration to us as a steady stream of sightings has been reported. Mike was very confident at the start of the trip that we'd get the leopard early on, but sadly this trip has proven that it is by no means easy or guaranteed!!

It wasn't for lack of trying. Mike and Lang couldn't have worked harder and there were several evenings when we finished at gone 03.00am with everyone completely exhausted. Our luck was out. According to Mike there is no particular pattern or "good" time of year. The Leopards come and go.

Sometimes they seem to disappear for weeks on end. Then they re-appear with a rash of sightings, though not always in the spots they were being seen previously. It really does seem to be a lottery and all you can do is keep plugging away, hoping your number eventually comes up.

A birding group were lucky enough to see both Marbled Cat and daytime sighting of Binturong the day before we arrived at Deramakot. We heard the news on our arrival at Base Camp and didn't know whether to laugh or cry. We put the Marbled Cat to bed a few days later but sadly couldn't find a Binturong, as the figs on the particular tree had just gone over.

We live in hope of one day seeing a Sun Bear but it wasn't to be this time. Apparently it was the wrong time of year, August through October being the key time. And, one day, some of us might see a Moonrat. Other "specials" that eluded us include Banded Linsang, Malay Weasel (both of which I saw in Danum on my first trip), Yellow-throated Marten and Thick-spined Porcupine. Their day will come (we hope!).

In total we saw 47 species of mammal and 93 species of birds. A full list of birds and mammals and other notable wildlife can be found in the PDF version of the report

 

 

So, I need to return to Borneo soon, to find the clouded leopard, but first I have the joys of South Africa to look forward to in September and on the horizon for next year will hopefully be a return to Brazil. Anyone who might be interested in joining me in my search for Maned Wolf, Giant Anteater and a host of other goodies please drop me a PM as I'm always keen to share costs!

 

The end.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks for a great report. Sorry you didn't find the clouded leopard. It certainly wasn't for lack of trying, was it? You gave it the best you could -- and certainly more than most people would be willing. Here's hoping you return soon and have the sighting of your life with it.

 

As for me, I'm extremely impressed with what you did see. Borneo is definitely on my list! In the meantime, best wishes for a wonderful visit to South Africa, and thank you again for sharing your Bornean experience with us.

Edited by Alexander33
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Great report Jo! I think those Bee-eaters like to get their picture taken since I had one pose nicely for me at Deramakot as well. It's great to read about a place you have just been but from a different perspective. It's sad but your pictures of the palm oil plantations tell an all too real story. I wish I had stopped to take some pictures but I forgot.

 

Anyway, here is hoping we both get back there soon.

 

Alan

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Thanks! :)

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An excellent detailed report with quite a few sightings. I look forward to hear more about Borneo from you. Perhaps one day you'll consider Papua New Guinea as well.

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Thanks!  New Guinea would be a dream destination for me but it is sp expensive! :(

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finally found the time to read the TR in one gulp. your photos were great and you did have such great sightings too - leopard cat, a skunk in a jungle! that stunning beeater - a Tarsier for goodness sake! they are so adorable. the marbled cat was gorgeous and i had turned to my cat and asked why he couldn't have been marbled as well. he just gave that indifferent look. 

 

thanks for sharing Jo!

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You're welcome!  I will definitely have to go back, but first I  go to South Africa  and  hopefully  Brazil after that! Might fit something else in between  these two trips though :) 

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Sold!! I definitely need to go to Borneo now. Those langurs are incredible and I so desperately want to see proboscis monkeys. Your trip looked amazing. The bird life that you saw was so varied and striking. I had no idea that Borneo had so much to offer in terms of wildlife!! 

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Thanks, yeah borneo has plenty of cool critters to see! :)

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