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Wildlife Photography Tutorial


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11 replies to this topic

#1 Soukous

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 09:46 AM

If, like me, you are always seeking to improve the quality of your photography you might find it worthwhile reading through this online tutorial put together by Robert Andersen for Photograpy Life

 

Wildlife Photography Tutorial


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"if you think you're too small to make a difference, try spending the night in a closed room with a mosquito."

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website: www.wildlifephotographyafrica.com

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#2 taylorqobrien

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 01:40 AM

Thank you! I will read through this in anticipation of our upcoming trip.



#3 Earthian

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 05:41 AM

If, like me, you are always seeking to improve the quality of your photography you might find it worthwhile reading through this online tutorial put together by Robert Andersen for Photograpy Life

 

Wildlife Photography Tutorial

 

Read all the chapters. Very well written and most of the experiences are so familiar! Thank you for sharing.


Lives of great men all remind us
   We can make our lives sublime,
And, departing, leave behind us
   Footprints on the sands of time.
  

#4 pault

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 07:58 AM

@Soukous. That's a really good article. Very personal and open and the successes and failures he describes ring true. Thanks for posting it.

If you're wondering whether it is worth reading, it definitely is. Whether you agree with everything or not and even if you are not he target audience (a lot of it is aimed an pretty obsessive folks with expensive equipment) I reckon most people will find something to make them think in there.
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#5 janzin

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 08:13 PM

thanks, this looks interesting...I've bookmarked it to read when I have some time!



#6 Kitsafari

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 07:18 AM

Like I told a brilliant photographer who attempted to teach really techno-challenged me (he really laid it all down in very simple terms, but my eyes glazed when shutter speed and ISO was mentioned together) how to use the camera besides AI mode, if Anderson's tutorial succeeds, he'll be a miracle worker.

 

But never say never, so I'll give it a shot at the tutorial anyway! thanks for sharing Martin. :)


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#7 Alexander33

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 04:44 AM

"You need to have a reason to be a wildlife photographer, a passion that drives you to get better and better. You don't have to be a pro to take great wildlife photos. In fact, there are many great photographers out there who are not pros. You are going to take crappy photos, don't sweat it, learn from your mistakes and keep improving, it takes time."

Truer words were never spoken. I look at photos I took a few years ago, and just cringe. My more recent photos are much better. But, then I realize the cycle will start all over again. The photos that I'm happy with today will likely end up looking as bad to my eyes in the future as those that I took a few years ago do to me today.

But regardless of one's expertise, nothing can surpass the simple joy of being in the field, of pursuing opportunity, of making new discoveries. If in the course of that journey you make some great photographs, then that is only an added benefit.

I personally love devoting my time and efforts toward nature photography. There are those who state people of my breed never actually experience the scene in front of them, because they are so focused (no pun intended) on making photographs, but I find that my anticipation of what might be the next shot actually makes me more alert, more aware, and more open for unexpected discovery than I used to be before I

Edited by Alexander33, 29 March 2017 - 04:50 AM.

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"Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."  -- Unknown 


#8 russell

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 07:36 PM

Like I told a brilliant photographer who attempted to teach really techno-challenged me (he really laid it all down in very simple terms, but my eyes glazed when shutter speed and ISO was mentioned together) how to use the camera besides AI mode, if Anderson's tutorial succeeds, he'll be a miracle worker.
 
But never say never, so I'll give it a shot at the tutorial anyway! thanks for sharing Martin. :)



@kitsafaris

Most DSLRs these days can be configured to reduce the complexities. Without getting too technical, you use auto ISO, set a minimum shutter speed and all you have to concern yourself with is depth of field, your aperture.

(Yes some exposure compensation too, but it makes life a lot easier)

Au revior ST - its been a pleasure, see you in 2015!


#9 kittykat23uk

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 08:58 PM

I read a lot of it, it's a really good tutorial. A lot of the observations i find quite intuitive , like making sure the eyes are sharp, effect of light etc. The trouble is when writing trip reports I find I can't just show only the best, most perfect shots. I want to give a whole picture of what i saw and experienced. That means my photos on Flickr are a complete mixed bag.

Maybe i need to set up a separate website to start showcasing only my best shots. :)
If an experience is amazing enough to be "once in a lifetime," I want to do it every year.
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#10 AmyT

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 11:43 PM

We checked in today to part two of the family vacation to Orlando at Disney's Animal Kingdom Lodge.  My only reason to switch hotels is to practice taking photos of African animals with my new awesome lens.

 

Can someone give me a quick tip or two on  how not to fog up your glasses while trying to take photos?  I am not used to the humidity so it's a different experience from what happens at home in my desert Southern California environment.

 

Thanks!

 

Edited to mention that I have read some of his previous articles and will be reading this when the light fails tonight!


Edited by AmyT, 29 March 2017 - 11:47 PM.

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#11 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 12:43 AM

if it is really not I use a swat band on my forehead

 

you will take better photos  if you intently watch the animals to see what they doing


Wild Africa is in my blood. All life is sacred and interconnected. for the animals are fellow nations caught in the splendor and trevail of the earth.


#12 pault

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 01:50 AM

@AmyT Do you mean the glass on the lenses or the glass over your eyes. Actually both may be an issue and I recommend that you post that question as a separate thread because it can be an issue in Africa sometimes too.You will need to watch out for it at Ol Pejeta.


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