Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Soukous

Wildlife Photography Tutorial

14 posts in this topic

If, like me, you are always seeking to improve the quality of your photography you might find it worthwhile reading through this online tutorial put together by Robert Andersen for Photograpy Life

 

Wildlife Photography Tutorial

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you! I will read through this in anticipation of our upcoming trip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If, like me, you are always seeking to improve the quality of your photography you might find it worthwhile reading through this online tutorial put together by Robert Andersen for Photograpy Life

 

Wildlife Photography Tutorial

 

Read all the chapters. Very well written and most of the experiences are so familiar! Thank you for sharing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@@Soukous. That's a really good article. Very personal and open and the successes and failures he describes ring true. Thanks for posting it.

 

If you're wondering whether it is worth reading, it definitely is. Whether you agree with everything or not and even if you are not he target audience (a lot of it is aimed an pretty obsessive folks with expensive equipment) I reckon most people will find something to make them think in there.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks, this looks interesting...I've bookmarked it to read when I have some time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like I told a brilliant photographer who attempted to teach really techno-challenged me (he really laid it all down in very simple terms, but my eyes glazed when shutter speed and ISO was mentioned together) how to use the camera besides AI mode, if Anderson's tutorial succeeds, he'll be a miracle worker.

 

But never say never, so I'll give it a shot at the tutorial anyway! thanks for sharing Martin. :)

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

"You need to have a reason to be a wildlife photographer, a passion that drives you to get better and better. You don't have to be a pro to take great wildlife photos. In fact, there are many great photographers out there who are not pros. You are going to take crappy photos, don't sweat it, learn from your mistakes and keep improving, it takes time."

 

Truer words were never spoken. I look at photos I took a few years ago, and just cringe. My more recent photos are much better. But, then I realize the cycle will start all over again. The photos that I'm happy with today will likely end up looking as bad to my eyes in the future as those that I took a few years ago do to me today.

 

But regardless of one's expertise, nothing can surpass the simple joy of being in the field, of pursuing opportunity, of making new discoveries. If in the course of that journey you make some great photographs, then that is only an added benefit.

 

I personally love devoting my time and efforts toward nature photography. There are those who state people of my breed never actually experience the scene in front of them, because they are so focused (no pun intended) on making photographs, but I find that my anticipation of what might be the next shot actually makes me more alert, more aware, and more open for unexpected discovery than I used to be before I

Edited by Alexander33
5 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like I told a brilliant photographer who attempted to teach really techno-challenged me (he really laid it all down in very simple terms, but my eyes glazed when shutter speed and ISO was mentioned together) how to use the camera besides AI mode, if Anderson's tutorial succeeds, he'll be a miracle worker.

 

But never say never, so I'll give it a shot at the tutorial anyway! thanks for sharing Martin. :)

 

@kitsafaris

 

Most DSLRs these days can be configured to reduce the complexities. Without getting too technical, you use auto ISO, set a minimum shutter speed and all you have to concern yourself with is depth of field, your aperture.

 

(Yes some exposure compensation too, but it makes life a lot easier)

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a lot of it, it's a really good tutorial. A lot of the observations i find quite intuitive , like making sure the eyes are sharp, effect of light etc. The trouble is when writing trip reports I find I can't just show only the best, most perfect shots. I want to give a whole picture of what i saw and experienced. That means my photos on Flickr are a complete mixed bag.

 

Maybe i need to set up a separate website to start showcasing only my best shots. :)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

We checked in today to part two of the family vacation to Orlando at Disney's Animal Kingdom Lodge. My only reason to switch hotels is to practice taking photos of African animals with my new awesome lens.

 

Can someone give me a quick tip or two on how not to fog up your glasses while trying to take photos? I am not used to the humidity so it's a different experience from what happens at home in my desert Southern California environment.

 

Thanks!

 

Edited to mention that I have read some of his previous articles and will be reading this when the light fails tonight!

Edited by AmyT
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if it is really not I use a swat band on my forehead

 

you will take better photos if you intently watch the animals to see what they doing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@@AmyT Do you mean the glass on the lenses or the glass over your eyes. Actually both may be an issue and I recommend that you post that question as a separate thread because it can be an issue in Africa sometimes too.You will need to watch out for it at Ol Pejeta.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

On 3/30/2017 at 0:43 AM, AmyT said:

Can someone give me a quick tip or two on how not to fog up your glasses while trying to take photos? I am not used to the humidity so it's a different experience from what happens at home in my desert Southern California environment.

 

Thanks!

 

 

@AmyT A kind of round about answer to your dilemma.  

I wear glasses, and for years I struggled taking photographs, AND ended up with scratches on every pair. Then a few years ago I decided there had to be a better way. 

I set the diopter on my viewfinder as close as possible to my glasses prescription and simply stopped wearing them. It took a leap of faith to trust that the autofocus was going to get it right, and was delighted to find that it usually does.  

A big added bonus is that it is much easier to hold the camera steady without wearing glasses as I can press it really hard against my eye socket.  I keep the glasses on for spotting but then keep them off as long as I'm using the camera.  I gues it depends on how good/bad your eyesight is and what you are able to see without your glasses, but doing this has really helped me.

Edited by Soukous
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Soukous said:

 I keep the glasses on for spotting but then keep them off as long as I'm using the camera.  I gues it depends on how good/bad your eyesight is and what you are able to see without your glasses, but doing this has really helped me.

 

@Soukous I had that same problem. I wanted to take an image without wearing my glasses but needed my glasses on to read the LCD information and look for subjects (mainly birds). It drove me nuts.

 

My optometrist suggested I try mono vision... where in my dominant eye (the eye I use to look through the viewfinder) I wear a long distance contact lens and my non dominant eye has my natural shortsighted vision to read the back of the camera.  Your brain merges what both eyes are seeing and it can take awhile to adjust.

 

Some people can't handle it but I don't have that problem. Amazingly for me the result is 20/20 vision, though there is some loss of depth of field perception, something I need to be aware of if driving home. If that becomes a problem after a shoot I take the contact lens out and put my glasses on.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


© 2006 - 2017 www.safaritalk.net - Talking Safaris and African Wildlife Conservation since 2006. Passionate about Africa.