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amybatt

So now they're poaching in zoos?

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This is just sickening. I find this hard to believe.

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@@amybatt Very sad, but I have to say I don't find this hard to believe at all, the only thing that surprises me about this is that it has taken until 2017 for this to happen. The last time I visited a zoo was in 2010 when I went to Marwell Wildlife (formerly Marwell Zoo) near Winchester where they use to have an annual wildlife art exhibition, I remember walking passed their three southern white rhinos lying out in their paddock and thinking that their sizeable horns must be worth a huge amount of money. A white rhinos horn can average 4kgs and be worth around 300,000 USD, it would not surprise me at all if these rhinos had between them anything from 600,000 to 1 million USDs worth of horn. As far as I could see the rhinos were simply locked in a shed at night making them in my view a very tempting target for any criminals aware of the value of rhino horn, for some years now criminal gangs have been stealing horns from museums and private houses that have old hunting trophies, it's not a huge leap to start thinking about killing captive rhinos once you worked out how to sell the horns. I'm sure that the only reason this happened before is because armed criminal gangs in European countries didn't have sufficient knowledge of the rhino horn trade and how to sell the horns, because it struck me when I saw the rhinos at Marwell that breaking in and killing them and taking the horns would not be that hard at all.

 

This is not the first time that zoo animals have been poached tigers in a number of zoos in Asia have been killed at least as far as I can recall this has happened more than once. I hope that this incident in France will lead all zoos that have rhinos to review their security, after all if even captive rhinos aren't safe what hope is there.

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The only words I can find "it is terrible".

 

As we went 3 years ago to the National Historical Museum in Bern (Switzerland) all Horns of Rhinos in the expedition where replaced to wooden dummies. The big African mammals in the expedition in Bern date back to a collection of Bernard von Wattenwyl, burgher of Bern, artist and big game hunter, then resident in London, collected during an expedition with his daughter Vivienne in the years 1923-24 and donated to the museum in his home town.

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I agree with @@inyathi. I'm amazed it has taken so long given the high value of these horns.

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When I read this earlier today all I could think was "this planet is doomed". I just felt such a wave of hopelessness and just can't take all this bad news about what is happening to our precious home, Earth, and its wildlife inhabitants. Ugh. Some days there just isn't enough wine. :(

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  • this is aweful

security has to be reviewed

being in France there would be concerns for what else people going around with weapons could do

rhino horns have been attacked in museum displays , so it is time to review such displays which go massively against the ideas of current society

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Pitiful.

 

Unlike out in the bush, I would think there would be some surveillance systems that might help catch these folks. Of course, I would have expected any surveillance to prevent this in the first place. Perhaps an inside job?

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@@Atravelynn, I thought the same thing about it being an inside job. In most first-world countries the zoos are really secure and people don't just walk in and get into enclosures. I can't think of one I've been to in the US that doesn't move the animals inside at night into secured facilities. I've heard of instances from keepers where they've had to stay overnight until the animal decides to cooperate and come inside (Washington DC pandas).

 

I have been thinking about this particular incident and I've decided that what bothers me most about it (after the obvious senseless loss of life) is that up to know I've reconciled the any negative feelings I have around zoos and the necessary captivity that comes with them with the benefits of conservation and resulting "security" of a member of a threatened species. In my head, if they're locked up in a zoo, they're safer than out in the savannah. It's that mismatch now that disturbs me. And that it will now give others the wrong idea.

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On 3/8/2017 at 9:49 PM, amybatt said:

I have been thinking about this particular incident and I've decided that what bothers me most about it (after the obvious senseless loss of life) is that up to know I've reconciled the any negative feelings I have around zoos and the necessary captivity that comes with them with the benefits of conservation and resulting "security" of a member of a threatened species. In my head, if they're locked up in a zoo, they're safer than out in the savannah. It's that mismatch now that disturbs me. And that it will now give others the wrong idea.

 

~ @amybatt

 

Until I read your illuminating comment above I'd never thought of the mismatch.

 

Working and living where I do, thinking about hapless captive animals in zoos is something that I avoid to the greatest degree possible.

 

Your comment opens a fresh line of thinking, with additional concerns.

 

Thank you for bringing this out.

 

Tom K.

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