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Self driving Namibia...the way to go!

Namibia self drive

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#21 xelas

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 12:51 PM

From fluffy white to heavy black, clouds are always making the photos better!

#22 Peter Connan

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 04:39 PM

You are making me very excited about my own up-coming trip Dave! Great stuff already, and you've hardly started.

If an X-trail can manage the road to Grootberg it must be a lot easier than i had believed.
Ek oefen skelm.

#23 Dave Williams

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 08:38 PM

You are making me very excited about my own up-coming trip Dave! Great stuff already, and you've hardly started.

If an X-trail can manage the road to Grootberg it must be a lot easier than i had believed 

@PeterConnan The X-trail didn't even need the 4x4 anywhere else. If you are camping I can see the point of hiring a Hillux otherwise it's O.T.T for most people in my opinion. It seemed some people see them as a status symbol and you were more likely to see one of them speeding than any other vehicle although in fairness they were probably in the majority too. They are the White Van Man we see in the UK. They think they are invincible driving a tank and to a certain extent they are. I saw one on it's roof as a result of driver error though. Driving too fast on gravel and hitting the brakes. Result:Skid,hit side bank of gravel, flip over, write off the vehicle. The rear cab saved the occupants from injury, they were lucky.

Right, hard hat on and I'll take shelter from replies to my opinion!



#24 Peter Connan

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 03:46 AM

Jip, that's me. The big 4x4's (mostly) feel very planted and serene on bad dirt roads, but if they start sliding and hit an obstruction, they are far more likely to roll.

 

Seriously though, the local farmers pride themselves on their dirt-road driving ability, and often do 120+ on these dirt roads, at the same time deriding the tourists for their ineptness.

But I suspect the local experts may be a big contributing factor, because a nervous tourist is likely to do the wrong thing in the cloud of dust kicked up by a speeding vehicle.


Ek oefen skelm.

#25 Dave Williams

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 09:04 AM

This was the day I had been looking forward to for a long time. The excitement of getting close to one of these magnificent beasts was something I would treasure forever, well provided we found one! 

There are no guarantees and we didn't expect one either, they are wild animals after all and unlike some places they don't have electronic tracking devices on them although if it gives them extra protection I wouldn't mind if they did.

Our alarm went of at 5.00am, we were due to leave at 6.00am. In fairness to the Lodge they lay on a full and proper breakfast from 5.00am onwards. As it happened there were only 4 of us taking the trip so plenty of space on the vehicle.

The early morning light was quite spectacular

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The outlook for the day looking very promising indeed!

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It was a fairly long drive from the Lodge to where we would begin searching so the first stop was an opportunity for a loo break.

This is it.

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You have been warned!

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Claire can't decide if she can hang on for what could be hours!

Anyway, after everyone has decided we move on and to my surprise suddenly come across a small settlement in the middle of nowhere.

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The anti-poaching unit have made camp here.We pick up a couple of the team who will accompany us so there are now 4 "guests". 2 trackers, 2 from the anti poaching unit and 1 driver. Not quite as much space in the vehicle now but it didn't last for long. 

We stopped, flushing what I think was a Lanner Falcon in the process 

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Two Black-backed Jackals soon made off from a nearby otherwise hidden location too. Another first for me!

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The trackers and the A-P team all got off and spread out to look for tracks, we carried on driving coming across a Zebra 

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and a pair of Kudu as we went. ( Another first, things were looking up!)

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We went so far then the driver turned the vehicle around and headed back the way we had come. He had received a message that the trackers had found a Rhino.

This was great news. We were with them in minutes and we were ushered a short distance to a safe viewing point on top of some huge boulders.

There she was, she's called Elizabeth, and in my opinion she's beautiful.

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We had been warned to keep as quiet as possible as they have good hearing, they also have a good sense of smell but very poor eyesight.

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The wind was carrying our scent directly to her and she was obviously a bit nervous. She moved back a bit.

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Luckily not too far away though. I don't know how long we stayed to watch, probably no more than 5 minutes as we didn't want to disturb her and she was obviously not happy we were there. She moved behind a bush and just stood there and there was little point in staying longer. We had however had some terrific views and a chance to get very close to her too. Perhaps within 30 metres.

All this and it was only 9.30 a.m.

It was a very magical but also a very poignant experience. Isn't it tragic that these stunning animals are killed to satisfy an ignorant,stupid, inadequate somewhere in some far off place. Whoever creates the demand though cannot surely be uneducated. They have to be rich. What's the matter with these people. Words fail me.

Thankfully there are some who do their best to protect them.

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The guides wouldn't tell us how many Rhinos there were... for obvious reasons. They did tell us that they were relocated from Etosha to what was seen as a safe environment 13 years ago. Surrounded by mountains it was decided this place would be ideal to help protect them but the risk is always there and several Rhino's have met a grisly fate in this district.

To add to the risk from poaching, for the last 7 years there has been a critical lack of water which has created a food shortage for all the wildlife living there.

After we left Elizabeth we drove around for another 2 hours or so and found very few signs of life but quite a lot of dead carcasses, mainly Zebra.

Rhino can and do survive better than most as they can eat a wider variety of leaves and grasses, other species are less fortunate.

With mammals seemingly non existent we did spot a Skink, well the guide did.

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 Up in the air a pair of very distant  Verreaux's Eagles

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and the brilliant flash of colour on the other side of the valley caught my attention and I asked the driver to stop.

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With only a 100-400 lens a full frame camera, even with a 1.4TC added, it was along way off for anything more than a record shot.

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I must admit I was feeling frustrated at the lack of opportunities. 

We picked up some fresh Rhino tracks but despite them telling us they were less than an hour or so old we didn't pursue them. Instead we headed away and found a spot for lunch which was way out of the valley and on the way back to the lodge.

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That was it then.

I have mixed feelings about the whole trip.

We actually saw more wildlife on the way back and much closer to the Lodge

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A small herd of Giraffe as well as a large troop of Baboons.

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We were back at base very early afternoon.

The morning's adventure had cost us £250. A fair amount and off the top of my head, probably the most I have ever spent on a single event ( topping the £90 it cost to watch Liverpool loose the League Cup final at Wembley last year!). 

You can't compare the two of course. Standing watching the Rhino, even if it was only for a few minutes was something very, very special. I had been humbled in it's presence to be honest, ashamed and hugely annoyed at what mankind can and has done to them.

I guess my expectations hadn't been met in other ways though. We had only walked 30-40 metres from the vehicle to see the Rhino, hardly a trek. We had seen very little wildlife at all and the whole trip was over pretty soon.

On the other hand, if there is little in the way of wildlife there is little point in carrying on looking. The aim to show us a Rhino had been met so why go looking for another and in turn disturbing it.

I reasoned with myself that if the £250 went towards Rhino conservation it was worth every penny. Hopefully it does.

A few days later I spoke to some people who made the trip after us. They were out until 6.00pm having not found a Rhino until late afternoon. They had also walked for miles to the point of exhaustion. They though felt satisfied with the experience.

I guess the more the effort the more the reward.

Anyway, the good news I guess was that I now had a free afternoon back at the Lodge for a bit of birding!

On our arrival we had been warned not to stray away from the paths that lead to the huts/rooms. Lions were present. A Zebra kill had taken place in front of one of the rooms only a few days ago, the lions had also been known to visit the swimming pool for a drink. Really?

Believe what you may. There were certainly Zebra very close to the rooms

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I felt that the hype about the dangers was more to do with the attempt to push us towards a guided walk. Anyway, I didn't bite and I didn't stray very far at all.

I spent an hour or two hanging around waiting to see what might turn up on two wings, especially hopeful of fly-by eagles but it was very quiet indeed.

The Rock Hyrax came out of their hiding places in the boulders below the restaurant balcony and despite their size managed to not only climb the trees but have thin branches support them.

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They seem to survive on a diet of these leaves

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I was using the 600mm and tripod to photograph them which was a total overkill as you could walk right up to one and use a phone camera if you wanted to. They are so used to people.

One or two of the birds seem likewise. The African Red-eyed Bulbul being one of them.

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While I'm trying and failing to get an unobscured shot whilst one is sat in the tree, Claire takes shots with her phone when it shares her table at the bar looking for crumbs !

The Pale-winged Starling co-operated a little better.

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Wandering off to the car park I had a brief encounter with a couple of birds, one escaped my camera, the other gave a very brief opportunity. 

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I have decided it's a Carp's Tit but I might be mistaken. Could be Southern Black Tit. Either way it doesn't matter really. This was the only one I saw in Namibia as far as I was aware and it's a first!

Our next door neighbours chalet seemed to attract a Mountain Wheatear but it steadfastly refused me a better photo opportunity.

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I was beginning to get frustrated. I'd been in Namibia for nearly 5 days now and hardly taken a decent shot of anything.

If there wasn't anything about I would go and find something elsewhere so informing Claire I was taking the car off I went.

The lodge has a waterhole a few hundred metres from the buildings and to my delight there was a Kudu there taking a drink. Excellent!

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It was obviously malnourished poor thing. You only had to look around and see the total lack of vegetation. It was soon joined by a troop of Baboons, must have been 20 or 30. Probably the ones we saw earlier had come up out of the valley.

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The big male kept an eye on me whilst having a drink

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In terms of distance and view point this was probably the best waterhole we visited in the whole of Namibia. At last the photo opportunities were coming my way.

They must be eating enough to breed though as there was a very young one amongst them.

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The light was starting to deteriorate as the skies clouded. Although fitting the Kudu in the frame was tricky with a 600mm lens, for the Baboons it was perfect.

I decided I had to tell Claire what she was missing, besides it was no longer sunbathing weather so I popped back to the room to tell her. She decided to join me in the car. 

By the time we got back the Baboons had moved away from the water but we were soon joined by the rest of the Kudu family.

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We now had three youngsters as well as two adults.

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One of the adults munched on a few leaves but for the youngsters they were probably out of reach.

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We noticed both adults visited and licked at a something on the ground. I presume it's a salt lick provided by the lodge.

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After all had had their fill of water they wandered off. We weren't quite done yet though!

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Both a Speckled Pigeon and a Chestnut-backed Sparrow-lark made visits.

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Again, they would be the only ones I would see in Namibia so on a numbers game it was a success.

The dark skies started to drop a little rain so we decided to head back to the lodge and a pre-dinnorial drink.

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Once again we took in the stunning view but it was starting to look a bit menacing.

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Within a few minutes the views were almost totally obscured and the heavens opened.

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Mass panic as all the guests head towards shelter!

That evening instead of enjoying a sunset we stood around the wood fire by the bar but it gave us all a conversation point and once again we were one of the last in to dinner having spent time sharing our adventures with other guests.

With hindsight, again our late arrival the previous day and now rain meant that our time in Grootberg from a photo point of view had been more limited than expected. Getting up and out at 6.00am meant the morning had passed by there too.

The next day we were moving on heading towards Etosha N.P. 

My luck would change there for sure.

TBC.


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#26 xelas

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 09:41 AM

@Dave Williams , just being in Namibia is being lucky!

Did you ask the the lodge if you are allowed to drive your car around the plateau?! Because in 2014 they said only lodge cars are allowed to drive the tracks.

The X-Trail is not much smaller to Hilux. If you would drive a VW Polo, then that would be a different story. BTW what was the daily rate for the X-Trail? Do you have a full size photo of the model? Was it. 4WD or a 2WD version?

#27 Dave Williams

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 10:28 AM

@Dave Williams , just being in Namibia is being lucky!

Did you ask the the lodge if you are allowed to drive your car around the plateau?! Because in 2014 they said only lodge cars are allowed to drive the tracks.

The X-Trail is not much smaller to Hilux. If you would drive a VW Polo, then that would be a different story. BTW what was the daily rate for the X-Trail? Do you have a full size photo of the model? Was it. 4WD or a 2WD version?

@xelas You are of course absolutely right Alex. Not everyone has had the luck I have! Just being able to visit Namibia is indeed lucky.

The car was a 4x4. Nice comfortable ride over the bumpy surfaces and the extra ground clearance is certainly a benefit although we did have a few grating sounds from underneath on occasion (shh!). I booked it through Rentalcars.com, speaking to someone on the phone from their UK office.. They told me it was £880 for 25 days less 1 hour. This included the extra insurance to cover the excess and any other damage not in Avis's policy cover. They took a £55 deposit immediately, the rest was to be paid 1 month before picking it up. 

This they duly did and my credit card was charged £825 in January so I had paid them £880 in total. However, on the same statement they also gave me two credits, one £55, one for £5. Perhaps because they give a lowest price guarantee. The hire therefore cost me £820 which works out at £33 per day( roughly 530NR). With unleaded petrol at only around 11NR per litre even with a total mileage of 4764kms the fuel bill was only 4066NR in total. 

Speaking to some people who hired locally from ASCO for a Hillux looking truck, they paid less and were driving it through Botswana too. Their truck though would have been totally unsuitable for us as it only had two seats in the cab and a box behind. Great for securing your luggage but for photography pretty useless as you need one in the front, one in the back seat to allow clear viewing both sides.

These particular folk had made a previous trip but camping. They said that the cost of camping was higher than you first think as hiring the gear is expensive.I know that camp site fees are 400NR a night inside the park, much less outside apparently. I love my touring caravan but tenting in the rain would have been no fun at all. Mud everywhere! 

I'll stick a photo in an episode of the blog just for you too Alex!


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#28 xelas

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 07:29 PM

Thank You, @Dave Williams! It is so true what you have said about back seat bench; Zvezda would go ballistic if I would not hire a Double Cab; she also loves the wide square rear door windows, and higher seating (photographing) position of the Hilux.

 

In 2014 and 2015, for 2 weeks the daily rate was 1120 NAD (800 + 320 for insurance) with zero excess, tires and windscreen protection and fridge (Advanced Car Rental, Windhoek)

In 2016, for 2 weeks the daily rate was  1280 NAD fully insured, with fridge and coolbox (Kalahari 4x4, Upington)

In 2017, for 3 weeks the daily rate is 970 Nad with basic CDW, 30.000 NAD excess and camping equipment for 3 persons

 

That makes X-Trail half the price of a Hilux, and I might follow your example on our next trip to Namibia. Just where to put the fridge and its battery??


Edited by xelas, 09 March 2017 - 08:26 PM.

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#29 Dave Williams

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 08:22 PM

If you are camping @xelas the X-trail isn't going to be big enough. We had two holdall style bags in the 'boot" and there wasn't much room for anything else. My two camera bags were on the back seat when we were travelling from one place to another. I presume the reason for a Hillux is the tent is on the roof?

The back windows don't wind ( retract, they are electric!) all the way down in a Nissan either as they don't with so many cars. Not that much of a problem though.

If you are not camping you could save £27 per day on the car and £25 on the campsite and put it towards accommodation. We had 7 nights at under £50 for the room.

 

When I booked the Hyundai which morphed in to a Nissan on collection I seem to remember that a Hillux was nearly twice the price. What's interesting is the price you paid in 2016 which was a lot higher than this year or was that in South Africa?


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#30 xelas

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 08:28 PM

That high price was for Hilux collected in Upington, South Africa. However, that price was also full covered insurance, I have corrected my mistake.

 

We have used Hilux twice without RTT; maybe over the top for the routes and roads we did, but like it a lot. Not obligatory, for sure, but comfortable. For RTT, Hilux or Landcruiser. 

There is one more candidate, it should be even cheaper: Toyota Avanza! Very roomy and also higher seating position then regular cars.


Edited by xelas, 09 March 2017 - 08:31 PM.


#31 PeterHG

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 10:45 AM

We travelled with a Hilux without RTT last month. Due to the rains in the Kgalagadi the 4x4 came in handy a few times, though even in 4x4 mode we got stuck once. In all fairness a good car with enough clearance could have managed the trip, I think. The Hilux was a very comfortable ride, though and both the double cab and the fridge (with second battery) were very useful. In Augrabies and Fish River canyon we did a few trails that were only accessible to 4x4, so that was a bonus.  We used the Avanza a few years ago. Nice car with enough clearance. The only drawback was that it is a rear wheel drive, which felt a little unstable on one or two sand roads. We'll take a look at the x-trail, too, next time, though I agree with @xelas: what about the fridge? I understand from this discussion that, even as a 4x4, the x-trail comes cheaper than a Hilux. That's with looking into.


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#32 PeterHG

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 10:52 AM

Love your photo of the deck in the downpour @Dave Willams! That would have been a spectacle. It's a pity you had little time in Grootberg for more photography, but you certainly came away with some good ones! Looking forward to your next episode!



#33 Dave Williams

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 01:33 PM

Don't get me wrong I enjoyed our visit to Grootberg, what was there not to like about it ? OK the weather both on the way there and in part whilst we stayed might not have been the best but we did experience something a bit different from the norm in that respect and in it's own way it was a bit special.

The good points are that the location is spectacular but not my favourite, the food was pretty good but not the best, the room likewise was well appointed but not as good as some we were to experience. The Rhino trekking was well ... I have explained that already. Our final bill worked out at £605 for two nights D,B&B, the trek and a £30 bar bill, in my book expensive at an average £300 per night.  We had diverted a long way to get here, changing our original journey plan to accommodate it. 

Was it worth?

Yes, I suppose it was. Would I do it again? Probably not. Been there, done that , writing the story.

But the story isn't quite over yet!

The weather had improved dramatically overnight and the rains cleared again. Rain had produced a flurry of activity. Insects suddenly appearing and with them their predator birds. 

Some new species to add to my list too!

Check out from the Lodge is by 10.00am so I was keen to get some photography in before we left. To save duplicating the walk to and from the car park more times than necessary I decided to put a few things in the X-trail on the way to breakfast.

Oh no!

A wheel jack had been laid out on the floor next to my back wheel to point out I had a flat tyre. 

Great stuff. Not.

My spirits were immediately lifted with the arrival of someone who offered to change the wheel for me. Not only that, he'd take it to his workshop and repair it too. All for 200NR or £12.50. Done deal. I left him the keys and headed off to join Claire at breakfast. 

No longer having to change a tyre I could then indulge myself whilst Claire packed our bags.

Standing on our balcony I managed to add a surprising number of photographs to my trip list.

Yellow-bellied Eremomela

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Cape Bunting

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and Bokmakierie were all 'lifers " too.

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The Pale-winged Starling offered a nice wing display.

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The Mountain Wheatear almost co-operated fully!

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The Tawny-flanked Prinia was gone in an instant.

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But the White-fronted Canary gave a good enough view to realise that yesterday's Black-throated Canary wasn't in all probability.

With my car keys returned with an explanation that the side wall had been repaired we were ready for the off. Etosha N.P. here we come!

In the car park a quick check on the tyre and for the life of me I couldn't see any signs of a repair and I wasn't going to check the inside sidewall so to this day I'm not 100% convinced. Strange that there was someone capable of repairing a tyre in the Lodge car park which is miles from anywhere and that he was waiting at 7.00am in the morning. Ah well, who cares.

We had one last challenge to look forward to, the return down the track from the lodge.

Coming up I said it was a piece of cake, we had been down again when we went on the trek but it had been dark.  I decided we'd take a video to demonstrate so for all those intimidated here's the proof. ( you need to click on the photo to send you to Flickr to view)

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Piece of cake!

Our journey eastwards took us on to the gravel C40, a fairly uninspiring journey scenically but not from an avian prospective.

First a Pale-chanting Goshawk just had to be photographed even if it's perch was man-made.

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but what I spotted next had the cry to Claire, who was now driving,of

Stop! Stop! Stop! ( a command, in the nicest possible way, she would learn to live with later in the holiday!)

There it was , magnificent, a truly impressive bird.

Martial Eagle. Fantastic.

I'd seen one in The Gambia recently but despite efforts to get a photograph by walking 100's of metres through tall undergrowth, I'd failed. Here I just had to nip over a wire fence, avoid being seen ( hopefully by both the Eagle and the landowner), get on the right side for a frontal shot with the sun behind me and bingo.

Handholding the 600mm isn't the easiest but despite a couple of out of focus shots I got a couple I can live with happily.

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What a bird! Thanks Claire for putting up with me while I leave you on your own sitting in the car in the baking hot sun. The result was worth the suffering!!

I only asked her to stop one more time. I mean it can get tedious on a journey, this was on the tarmac'd section of the C40 when I spotted a White-backed Vulture flying over head.

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We had stopped at Kamanjab to re-fuel for the third time just to keep the tank topped up. This was the only place I seem to recall that stated they didn't take credit cards but as I was paying cash it didn't matter. Interesting that they chose to fill the car with the fuel nozzle that displayed the meter on the opposite side of the pump so hidden from view. Interesting no receipt was offered.... or asked for. It was only afterwards that I wondered. Suspicious? Me? Of course not! Fuel consumption would have been above average for the previous section as it was so mountainous. Wouldn't it?

Ah well, we were heading to my long awaited destination so I had other things on my mind.

For the record the C40 looks something like this for most of the way we travelled.

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Fast, traffic free..... and a bit tedious.

I had already decided to get to our destination, Etosha Village near the Anderson Gate, I would turn left off the C40 and take a more scenic short cut on the D2694 followed by the D2710. For anyone who tries this beware! The first turn right, the D2696, is clearly marked but definitely not the way to go. Our turning wasn't marked at all as far as I'm aware. By the time we realised it was too late to turn back. Our scenic shortcut ended up adding time although probably not too much mileage to the journey. 

This back route though demonstrated that the rains had arrived further east than Grootberg.

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Today though was stunning. Beautiful blue skies and sun for the most of it.

It was mid afternoon when we arrived at Etosha Village and we were most impressed. 4 nights here cost £365 for D,B&B. £90 a night. For that you get a bungalow chalet that is huge, complete with your own private garden area.

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Well appointed room complete with lots of electric sockets for recharging and a fridge too! There is even another outdoor covered sitting area outside the French windows.

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Excellent bathroom with a very large walk in shower.

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and what is really good is you can park right outside the door so you don't have to struggle far with your luggage.

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That's just the room though. The restaurant has a huge variety of food in the self service buffet. This was just my salad starter. 

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If that wasn't enough to make me happy the big screen TV behind the bar was showing my team playing live.

Liverpool vs Spurs and we stuffed them. Our run of bad form was finally ended with a superb display.

With Etosha to come in the morning,could I have been happier going to bed?

No!

T.B.C.


Edited by Dave Williams, 10 March 2017 - 01:39 PM.

  • africawild, michael-ibk, Peter Connan and 7 others like this

#34 Tdgraves

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 02:11 PM

@Dave Williams any idea why your photos are squashed/stretched in this thread and not in your big year?

#35 Dave Williams

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 04:24 PM

@Tdgraves In a word No! They don't look too different to me so I can't really see what you mean I'm afraid. They all come from Flickr but the shots taken with the Olympus are straight from the camera whereas the others were shot in RAW and processed, re-sized to 5x7 and converted to jpeg. Maybe Flickr has re-sized differently? I know the iPad/iPhone shots can be in different shapes and sizes.

Anyone else see a difference? Maybe screen viewing size changes things too. I'm looking at a desktop monitor.



#36 offshorebirder

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 10:57 PM

Excellent report @Dave Williams.    As a keen birder, I always appreciate the bird-centric trip reports. 

 

Thanks also for the detail you provide about car hires, places to shop for groceries, and other key details.  That is one of the great values of Safaritalk and you are doing it right.


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#37 Treepol

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Posted 11 March 2017 - 07:39 AM

@Dave Williams I'm really enjoying your report so far, thanks for the fine detail.

 

I'm looking forward to an Etosha fix as this is one of my favourite African parks.


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#38 PeterHG

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Posted 11 March 2017 - 08:13 AM

@Tdgraves In a word No! They don't look too different to me so I can't really see what you mean I'm afraid. They all come from Flickr but the shots taken with the Olympus are straight from the camera whereas the others were shot in RAW and processed, re-sized to 5x7 and converted to jpeg. Maybe Flickr has re-sized differently? I know the iPad/iPhone shots can be in different shapes and sizes.

Anyone else see a difference? Maybe screen viewing size changes things too. I'm looking at a desktop monitor.

 

The aspect ratio of the images is perfect when viewed on a desktop, but a little distorted when viewed on an iPad (well, on my iPad anyway)



#39 Tdgraves

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Posted 11 March 2017 - 09:17 AM

It it the iPad I have an issue with, but on his big year pages on the iPad, it is fine....

#40 xelas

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Posted 11 March 2017 - 12:14 PM

@Dave Williams

 

Our run of bad form was finally ended with a superb display.

 

Unfortunately, not the case  :angry: ! Reds can beat the top guys but they underperform with underdogs. Hopefully my words will be put back into my mouth tomorrow  :P .

 

Thanks for showing me the X-Trail. That is what I was afraid of,; those rounded style is just not my style. I will stick tot the Hilux if not able to hire the old style X-Trail. 

 

@Tdgraves it must be the iPad problem as iPad safari has stretched images and iMac safari don't. Go look at the report on an iMac, photos really deserves to be viewed in its full glory!







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