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Selfies inside national park


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11 replies to this topic

#1 gagan

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 12:33 PM

Is it ok for us to take selfies while dangerous animals are around inside a national park?

#2 egilio

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 05:50 PM

Safety wise? Or based on the opinion of others?


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#3 Atravelynn

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 02:33 AM

Were you thinking about the selfie stick protruding from the vehicle?  Or maybe just holding the camera at arm's length, but again protruding from the vehicle.  In that case I'd say no, so as not to attract the animal's attention and cause it to take a swipe.  Or so you don't frighten it off.

 

I heard a story about a guide in Kenya pointing something out to a guest with a long tse tse swatter.  The story goes that the lion he was pointing at had been shot at by a gun in the past and took offense and lunged at the car through the window.  All parties escaped intact.


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#4 JohnR

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 01:10 AM

@egilio I only just noticed your avatar is a selfie with a beautiful spotty. I can't decide which is the more handsome :)
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#5 pault

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 01:36 AM

If the animals are actually dangerous then the answer would be the same as "Is it okay to take selfies standing on a cliff?" The answer is that it is more OK than doing it standing on the Autobahn to Berlin while listening to Keaftwerk at high volume but unless you do them with the required degree of irony you are at grave risk of being considered "gauche" by anyone observing you - especially if the pose involves any exaggerated body movements or hand signals. For some, being stomped by an angry bull elephant might be preferable to the derision of the twittersphere that could follow.

I hope that comprehensively answers your question.
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#6 pault

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 01:43 AM

8565156434 bfdc1259ac B

 

For example, I had to change my name and physical appearance (shedding the muscle was tough!) after tweeting this from a recent trip to India. People are just so judgmental..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#7 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 03:11 AM

  • you would get better composition by asking someone else to take the photo
  • if you are using a phone as a camera it would be better to use a selfie stick adjusted down to a low length , making it less likely that you would drop it outside the vehicle

Wild Africa is in my blood. All life is sacred and interconnected. for the animals are fellow nations caught in the splendor and trevail of the earth.


#8 gagan

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 05:47 PM

Sometime people protrude out of the vehicle to take selfie when they see big cats in the park .
Sometimes they catch a nasty baboon somewhere outside and click pictures with it ..
I think these are highly dangerous activities which could be fatal sometimes.
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#9 Atravelynn

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 09:12 PM

Sometime people protrude out of the vehicle to take selfie when they see big cats in the park .
Sometimes they catch a nasty baboon somewhere outside and click pictures with it ..
I think these are highly dangerous activities which could be fatal sometimes.

agreed

 

@pault you and the tiger are in fine form!


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When you think of a rhino, think of a tree (African proverb)

#10 ajm057

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 02:43 PM

I just posted this in another thread -- The Ngorongoro Conservation rangers should also ban stupid folk with selfi sticks leaning out of the top of their safari truck while a hungry lioness is resting in the shade just below. I don't have the most extreme picture - where she was almost upside down with hair just above the lion and selfistick in the air - but these provide context.

 

However, let me add a few other thoughts from from a photographer's perspective, and its all to do with Depth of Field -- i.e. what is in and not in focus.

 

The the iPhone 7 Plus has that 23mm (equivalent) lens, with an f/1.8 aperture and a 1.5m long selfi-stick the image has a depth of field (using standard assumptions) of about 76 cm - if focussed on the person and the background further than 2.5m away will appear out of focus. This is what Iphone cameras are designed to do - they are designed to take portraits like if they were taken with a DSLR and a good lens. 

 

The GoPro Hero4 has an equivalent 17 mm lenses that comes with F2.8 aperture - this gives much larger depth of field. The go pro does not have the same focussing system as the Iphone. In fact it is hero4 actually has a fixed lens and the field of view is also fixed, this is supposed to give it a depth of fieldwith everything from 300mm-4.6m in focus. But it varies.

 

Taking shots with an Iphone and 5 foot long selfi-stick at arms length and focussed on the person holding the stick is unlikely to have the wildlife subject - the thing in the background - in focus. In most cases it will just be a blur. For the case of the lioness in the shade of the vehicle, the girl is at least using a gopro and that should allow both to be in focus --- BUT, it is clearly extremely stupid to hang out from the top of a landcruiser over a lioness

 

I have seen far worse behaviours in the Masai Mara recently, with safari vehicles containing folk wanting to shoot selfies getting very close to lions on a kill (whereas we the photographers are 20-40m away) and always with their back to the dangerous subjects.

 

Clearly I am absolutely against 

 
20160229-11-12-09_C013158 with WM.jpg
20160229-11-13-06_C013163 with WM.jpg
20160229-11-15-03_C013174 with WM.jpg

 


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#11 ZaminOz

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 03:57 AM

Well selfie or no selfie... in just about all cases in South Luangwa with a qualified guide, if you were to protrude any part of yourself out of the vehicle in the presence of a lion the guide would drive the vehicle away from the lions and give you a talking to. I have seen this happen.

The point is that this is about guiding standards not the behaviour of tourists, who to be fair to them, probably don't appreciate the danger. The guide is the (apparently trained) professional responsible for their safety and the well being of the wildlife as well.


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#12 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 05:11 AM

The selfie stick  could be useful as a grip to stop dropping the phone without extending the phone over the edge of the vehicle, the above photos are case studies on what not to do.

 

in practice a selfie stick is likely to be a whole lot of trouble 

 

and the photos will be no good as the woman has her hair blowing in her face


Edited by COSMIC RHINO, 27 March 2017 - 06:34 AM.

Wild Africa is in my blood. All life is sacred and interconnected. for the animals are fellow nations caught in the splendor and trevail of the earth.






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