Dave Williams

Dave Williams Big Year 2017

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13} Won't dwell on 13 too long, unlucky for the fish, a Stickleback but not for me or the male Goldeneye !

32267447340_abdf347fe9_b.jpgGoldeneye with Stickleback by Dave Williams, on Flickr

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14) Another over wintering duck in the UK, Pochard.

31807497724_64b815a678_b.jpgPochard by Dave Williams, on Flickr

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15) Gadwall do breed in small numbers in the UK.

32497440222_71276a101d_b.jpgGadwall by Dave Williams, on Flickr

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16) One of the UK's more common ducks, Tufted Duck. Male in the front, female bringing up the rear. Not much of a tuft apparent in this shot ! The male is very similar to the more seldom seen male Scaup. The latter has a silver back instead of black.

32271320900_40f87b6a09_b.jpgTufted Duck by Dave Williams, on Flickr

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@@Dave Williams can you add the dates in future posts? Ta

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Posted (edited)

@@Dave Williams can you add the dates in future posts? Ta

 

@@Tdgraves As they are all linked to Flickr If you click on the photo it will give you the date and all the exif data including equipment used too if you are interested. To add all of that to every shot will get a bit tedious and I prefer to add some species information for those who don't often get to see the particular birds in the photo. Makes it a bit more educational!

Also, if you look at my Flickr link there might be some additional photos to look at too. Hope all that suits, cheers Dave

Edited by Dave Williams
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"Upload one picture per species, include when and where taken and tech specs."

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End of my big year then!

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Posted (edited)

End of my big year then!

 

Please not. @@Dave Williams

 

If somebebody wants to be dishonest, just the requirement for typing in a date is not going to make any difference, and there are so many ways to cheat at this, rather than just includingphotos from a different year.

 

If it's in the EXIF, as far as I am concerned it's much better than a stated date, as it's much more difficult to fudge. In any case, virtually nobody bothers with the tech specs.

 

I do like to see the "where", and love the extra information you add. However, the date can be of interest in migratory species, and those species that change plumage through the year.

Edited by Peter Connan
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@@Dave Williams, really enjoyed the last few "Duck" shots ( hope they're all Ducks, I'm a complete novice at this). They are all so pretty and certainly don't see those particular ones here. I think I may have seen the Goldeneye in Yellowstone?

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End of my big year then!

 

Please not. @@Dave Williams

 

If somebebody wants to be dishonest, just the requirement for typing in a date is not going to make any difference, and there are so many ways to cheat at this, rather than just includingphotos from a different year.

 

If it's in the EXIF, as far as I am concerned it's much better than a stated date, as it's much more difficult to fudge. In any case, virtually nobody bothers with the tech specs.

 

I do like to see the "where", and love the extra information you add. However, the date can be of interest in migratory species, and those species that change plumage through the year.

 

 

Unfortunately I didn't realise some think of this as a serious competition, I didn't think of it as competition at all, merely a documented record of some of the birds I will see during the year and I won't post shots that don't help with identification merely to boost the numbers. As someone who has more spare time than most even I don't want to waste it doing the unnecessary.

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@@Dave Williams, really enjoyed the last few "Duck" shots ( hope they're all Ducks, I'm a complete novice at this). They are all so pretty and certainly don't see those particular ones here. I think I may have seen the Goldeneye in Yellowstone?

I can't be 100% sure but I think the North American version is Barrow's Goldeneye. The only place to find them in Europe is Iceland, them being one of several Icelandic specials. Very similar at first sight but there are a few differences when you look again.

You can see a photo on my website link:-

http://www.pbase.com/davidwilliamsphotography/barrows_goldeneye

It was taken last year.In Iceland.

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I am sorry @@Dave Williams I didn't realise that typing a date was so difficult, it is certainly easier than a reader linking to another website to read an EXIF file

 

None of us take it seriously and there are no prizes - please continue to participate

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"Upload one picture per species, include when and where taken and tech specs."

 

It's the tech specs that are a pain and if anyone really want's information it's one click on the link, one click on the back arrow to nip in and out of a view.I doubt too many are bothered anyway.

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@@Dave Williams

 

All those extra data are helpful, but not obligatory, IMO. I recon the general area, and the bird species (if with latin name even better) is required. I prefer when the EXIF data is not removed but going to external links, when I am really interested, is working for me. BTW Tufted Ducks @ 1000 mm with TC 2.0 are very sharp. Did you used a tripod with gimbal head?

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@@xelas No tripod, just a hide window sill, not even a bean bag. The shutter speed was ridiculously high, I should have reduced the ISO and shutter speed as the 7D2 isn't in the same league as the 1DX for noise levels. I am going to aim at a maximum ISO 800 from now on.

 

Latin names..... amo,amas,amat was the scourge of my school days. That's all I can remember now, and it's all I could remember then too! For non English speakers they are a huge benefit also from English speakers when asking for details of what's been seen from non English speakers!

I'm not saying I will or won't add them but I don't want this thread to become a thorn in my side rather than a bit of fun.

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Posted (edited)

17) Blue Tit. Taken out of our bathroom window , a favourite spot although the window only opens out to 45º so the field of view is restricted.

One of the UK's most common garden birds.

31855192353_780b6b2df7_b.jpgBlue Tit. Parus Caeruleus by Dave Williams, on Flickr

Edited by Dave Williams
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@@Dave Williams

 

Alea iacta est ... no latin in my school. Yet any bird guide book have them, and internet is also a great tool. Last year I have learned (a hard way) that english name van vary for same latin name, and vice versa (wow, this one is also latin!!). So I took my task to search for both in relevant Birds of ..... books.

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Posted (edited)

Another bathroom shot ( please note Latin name now added to the Flickr title @@xelas :) ) from this afternoon.

18) Blackbird.

Found across Europe but particularly in my garden. I'm always envious when I see lemons and oranges growing in people's gardens in sunnier climes and a little dismayed to see them left to rot on the ground too. Here in the UK we do the same with apples but I try to keep mine somewhere in storage to provide a winter treat for the birds. The Blackbirds are particularly fond of them.

31855192543_46d80b458a_b.jpgBlackbird. Terdus Merula by Dave Williams, on Flickr

Edited by Dave Williams
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Latin and other-language names are definately not part of the deal Dave, and those that add them (like me), do so only for interest's sake. And in that regard, the titbits you add have us beat fair & square!

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Latin and other-language names are definately not part of the deal Dave, and those that add them (like me), do so only for interest's sake. And in that regard, the titbits you add have us beat fair & square!

 

Of all the add-ons the Latin name is probably the most useful. I went on an Hungarian photo hide photography trip with a friend of mine and trying to exchange information about what was seen by non English speaking co-participants at other hides was more than problematic. They knew the Latin names but not the English, we only grasped a couple of Latin names and so it was difficult to put their sightings to good use in planning which hide we wanted to visit next.

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19) Goosander

A bright sunny start to the day had me off to a well known spot for photographing Goosander but as soon as I arrived it turned really overcast.

The male is one of those really challenging two tone subjects made worse by the soft downy cream/white breast feathers that have little detail.

I went specifically for the male but failed to get anywhere near a good enough shot.

 

 

32668977156_d5d6d66fce_b.jpgGoosander. Mergus Merganser by Dave Williams, on Flickr

 

The female on the other hand is fairly easy as there is less contrast.

32586665021_327fb74d05_b.jpgGoosander. Mergus Merganser by Dave Williams, on Flickr

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@@Dave Williams

A very enjoyable start. The Dipper is a particular favourite!

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@@Dave Williams, those Ruddy Turnstones are turning up all over. I see a few "banded" birds in your collection. Haven't noticed that so much here, but then again I haven't been looking at our local birds for long. The yellow feet of the Little Egret certainly grab your attention, and a good help in ID for the less experienced I guess.

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