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Zubbie15

Only 7100 cheetahs remaining

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A new study out from ZSL, WCS and Panthera has determined that there are roughly 7100 cheetahs remaining in the wild. There are some pretty sobering statistics there, such as the suggestion that Zimbabwe has had a 85% decrease in numbers over the past 15 years. See more at the following links:

 

https://www.panthera.org/sprinting-towards-extinction-cheetah-numbers-crash-globally

 

https://www.panthera.org/cms/sites/default/files/Cheetah%20Infographic_Final_NewMaps_Panthera.pdf

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people need better returns and a better compensation for loss of livestock

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This latest info made it into many local news sources. That's good, at least, plight of the cheetah is being made known in wider circles.

 

:( :(

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Posted (edited)

biodiversity is not doing well

 

in serious decline rhinos,elephasnts,tigers,cheetahs,bears,,the entire IUCN red list and with dams,logging,soy ,oil ,the entire Amazon is at risk

 

the world has to do better, the planet is not a resource extraction reserve for the elite with a bit of trickle down

Edited by COSMIC RHINO
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Here the link to the original article: LINK

Every time researcher look a bit deeper into world-wide population they find that populations are (much) lower than thought. Of course they will only look into species about which there is a reason to be concerned about in the first place, but it's worrying nonetheless. Recently this came to light with leopards, and now with cheetahs.

In all the populations included in the paper only one (1!) was thought to be stable or increasing (3 others thought to be stable, all the other declining or unknown). The one population thought to be increasing is a small population (Liuwa).

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At least Zimbabwe is no longer allowing cheetah hunting. To my knowledge it's only Namibia whish is currently allowing it. I've known for quite a while that the cheetah was an endangered species,however, there's a tendancy by both the conservationists

and the hunters to exaggerate.

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people need better returns and a better compensation for loss of livestock

 

Only if their husbandry practices have a certain standard.

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At least Zimbabwe is no longer allowing cheetah hunting. To my knowledge it's only Namibia whish is currently allowing it. I've known for quite a while that the cheetah was an endangered species,however, there's a tendancy by both the conservationists

and the hunters to exaggerate.

 

Yes, only Namibia allows the hunting of cheetahs, many farmers still persecute as vermin. The US won't allow importation of cheetah trophies though.

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TIME MAGAZINE is reporting that the united arab emerites has just banned the keeping of wild animals as pets

 

anyone who is seen in public with them gets up to 6 months in jail and /or a fine of up to USD 136,000

 

I am not sure if this is a reaction to the scientific report on cheetahs or to images people posted on social media with cheetahs on car boots, lions riding in cars and tigers walking through crowded traffic

 

this is not safe

 

sorry, I can't do links the story is called KEEPING CHEETAHS AND OTHER WILD ANIMALS AS PETS IS NOW ILLEGAK IN THE UAE and it mentions the GULF NEWS as a source

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