Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
COSMIC RHINO

MALARIA DISCUSSION

29 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

malaria is a very serious disease which kills 500,000 people per year

 

both effective treatment and prevention are difficult

 

the insects are increasingly resisting chemical sprays and the disease resisting medication

 

SCIENCEDAILY reports that some Harvard university scientists are trying a new approach ,hormonal blocking

 

please see http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/12/161215143549.html 15 dec BLOCKING HORMONAL ACTIVITY IN MOSQUITOES COULD HELP REDUCE MALARIA SPREAD

 

mosquitoes when treated with a hormone had shorter lives, fewer eggs and the development of the plasmodium parasites

 

it is the parasite that cause malaria

 

modeling suggests that it could be as effective for infection control as insecticide

 

some of the researchers have applied for patents

 

if this works it would be great to have insects controlled without spraying chemicals

 

the work was funded by the national institutes of health, the European community and the gates foundation

Edited by COSMIC RHINO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have heard on a BBC radio report that the origin of resistance to artemisian comes from very cheap generic drugs sold in Laos with as little as 1% active indegrient

 

it is not strong enough to be effective, but has enough in it for the insects to become used to it , and compromise the proper use of this compound

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

university of Texas research shows that an increased consumption of protein , and RAW fruit and veg can lessen the cardiac and muscular impact of mild cases malaria

 

 

please see http://www.sciencedaily.com go to health then malaria 12 JAN EXERCISE,DIET COULD OFFSET EFFECTS OF MALARIA

Edited by COSMIC RHINO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have heard on a BBC radio report that the origin of resistance to artemisian comes from very cheap generic drugs sold in Laos with as little as 1% active indegrient

 

it is not strong enough to be effective, but has enough in it for the insects to become used to it , and compromise the proper use of this compound

 

Regardless of the origin, this is one of the ways that resistance occurs! So maddening!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

there is some promising research into the bark of 2 west African varieties of citrus trees

 

it appears to be able to kill both the insects and the parasite

 

however, progress may be limited as

 

  • the market is mainly from poorer nations
  • research has been published in publically available journals, so it is harder to get a patent
  • under the convention for biological diversity rights for commercial development are given to where the plants come from

 

 

 

please see http://www.sciencedaily/com AFRICAN TREES KILL BOTH MALARIA MOSQUITOS AND THE PARASITE dated 27 JAN 2017

Edited by COSMIC RHINO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it turns out that malaria carrying misquitos are now resistant to both DDT and pyrethium.

 

this happened by the use of treated nets hung over beds

 

time to consider repellant options

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it turns out that malaria carrying misquitos are now resistant to both DDT and pyrethium.

 

this happened by the use of treated nets hung over beds

 

 

@@COSMIC RHINO can you provide the link to the research that showed this and........... is this about Africa, India or Worldwide. I would guess that local populations are developing resistance in different ways and to different drugs.

 

so reading the research papers conclusions would be very helpful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

an excellent source of information can be found at http://www.sciencedaily.com on many things including medicine and environmental issues.

 

the research on insect resistance to sprays was done at the Liverpool tropical medicine school and published open access in PLOS

 

the use of insect spray treated bed nets created this problem in Africa

 

the sciencedaily report notes that the resistance is less with the southern African bugs

Edited by COSMIC RHINO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

on DDT please see https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140224204808.html

 

 

a 2010 study published in the esteemed PNAS journal found that mosquitoes are resistant to DEET please see http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100506092733.html

Edited by COSMIC RHINO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks @@COSMIC RHINO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

recent Swedish research please see http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170209142640.html shows that once someone has once someone has been bitten by a malaria carrying misquito , the parasite produces a molecule HMBPP which stimulates the human red blood cells to produce more carbon dioxide and volatile compounds which will attract more of the same stinging insects in the future

 

even a very low level of HMPBB is appealing , they go back to the same person

 

they need HMBPP to grow

 

it is their taxi system to spread the infection around according to the report

 

under consideration is using HMBPP as a trap to attract malaria mosquitoes

Edited by COSMIC RHINO
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

  • research from the francis crik institute shows that someone who get malaria is able to eventually destroy most of the infection, but some remain within the body as part of the pir gene family, they can stay around for years without causing symptoms

please see http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170206111900.html

after looking a reports at sciencedaily I will be using lemon eculyaptus , cinnamon oil etc within a body wash gel

deet presents problems ,and the one time I used it , I got a bad skin rash almost immediately

lemon eucalyptus oil is not the one commonly used in products, it is available in Sydney but not easily , it is easier for me to get it online from the UK using Fishpond an online dealer from New Zealand

Edited by COSMIC RHINO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

  • a system to diffuse Artemesione according to individual patient needs is in the process of being developed

it is expected to be affordable for developing countries]

please see http://sciencedaily.com

go to health ,then more topics ,then malaria MALARIA TREATMENT SOON TO BE SIMPLER 10 MARCH

this is promising

Edited by COSMIC RHINO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just as chemical sprays are failing to control the insects , new options are coming up

 

Mosquito-killing fungi engineered with spider and scorpion toxins could help fight malaria

Posted: 13 Jun 2017 07:19 AM PDT

A mosquito-killing fungus genetically engineered to produce spider and scorpion toxins could serve as a highly effective biological control mechanism to fight malaria-carrying mosquitoes, scientists report. The fungus is specific to mosquitoes and does not pose a risk to humans. Further, the study results suggest that the fungus is also safe for honey bees and other insects.uEeiuSCqeyI?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email

 

"In this paper, we report that our most potent fungal strains, engineered to express multiple toxins, are able to kill mosquitoes with a single spore," said Brian Lovett, a graduate student in the UMD Department of Entomology and a co-author of the paper. "We also report that our transgenic fungi stop mosquitoes from blood feeding. Together, this means that our fungal strains are capable of preventing transmission of disease by more than 90 percent of mosquitoes after just five days."

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170613101954.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fplants_animals%2Fanimals+(Animals+News+--+ScienceDaily)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anti-malaria drugs: Potential new target identified

Date:June 14, 2017Source:Penn State
Summary:

A newly described protein could be an effective target for combatting drug-resistant malaria parasites. The protein regulates a number of genes involved with a critical part of the parasite's complex life cycle -- its invasion of a person's red blood cells. Now that the researchers know the protein's role in this invasion process, they have a completely new angle for developing new antimalarial drugs for targeting the malaria parasite

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170614121035.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fhealth_medicine%2Fmalaria+(Malaria+News+--+ScienceDaily)

 

interesting  they are working on blocking where the parasites attack the blood

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

an interesting development the bugs don't like light

Manipulating mosquitoes with light

Date:
June 16, 2017
Source:
University of Notre Dame
Summary:
Exposure to just 10 minutes of light at night suppresses biting and manipulates flight behavior in the Anopheles gambiae mosquito, the major vector for transmission of malaria in Africa, according to new research.
 

Critical behaviors exhibited by the species, such as feeding, egg laying and flying, are time-of-day specific, including a greater propensity for nighttime biting. A recent report from the World Health Organization stated an estimated 212 million people worldwide are infected with the disease, resulting in 429,000 deaths -- mostly children.

For the study, Duffield and his team tested the mosquitoes' preference to bite during their active host-seeking period by separating them into multiple control and test batches. Control mosquitoes were kept in the dark, while test batches were exposed to a pulse of white light for 10 minutes. Researchers then tested the propensity of the mosquitoes to bite immediately after the pulse and every two hours throughout the night, holding their arms to a mesh lining that allowed uninfected mosquitoes to feed while remaining contained. Results indicated a significant suppression. In another experiment, mosquitoes were pulsed with light every two hours, and using this multiple pulse approach the team found that biting could be suppressed during a large portion of the 12-hour night.

University of Notre Dame. "Manipulating mosquitoes with light." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 June 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170616091609.htm>.

University of Notre Dame. (2017, June 16). Manipulating mosquitoes with light. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 20, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170616091609.htm

University of Notre Dame. "Manipulating mosquitoes with light." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170616091609.htm (accessed June 20, 2017).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scientists have demonstrated a way to edit the genome of disease-carrying mosquitoes that brings us closer to suppressing them on a continental scale
 

The technology at the heart of the study is called a gene drive system, which manipulates how genetic traits are inherited from parent to offspring. Gene drives are used to bias genetic inheritance in favor of rapidly spreading, self-destructive genes, and could be an environmentally friendly and cost-effective way to suppress populations of disease-spreading insects. 

 

report continues  www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170627134439.htm   

 

thee is  a proof  of concept but a whole lot more needs to be done  ,it could be another 10 years unit it can be used 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Malaria control in African schools dramatically cuts infection and reduces risk of anemia Three-pronged approach improves ability of Malian schoolchildren to pay attention in class

Date:June 28, 2017Source:London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
Summary:

Schools that provide prevention education, insecticide-treated nets and antimalarial treatment, in regions where malaria is highly seasonal, could reduce the risk of schoolchildren developing anemia and improve their cognitive performance

 

story continues  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170628200025.htm

 

Temperature changes make it easier for malaria to climb the Ethiopian highlands

Date:June 14, 2017Source:IOP Publishing
Summary:

The highlands of Ethiopia are home to the majority of the country's population, the cooler climate serving as a natural buffer against malaria transmission. New data now show that increasing temperatures over the past 35 years are eroding this buffer, allowing conditions more favorable for malaria to begin climbing into highland areas

 

story continues  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170614211156.htm

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Removal of invasive shrub could be an easy way to help reduce malaria transmission

 

The study focused on the removal of the flowers of the invasive shrub Prosopis juliflora, which is native to Central and South America but was introduced to new areas in the late 1970's and early 1980's as an attempt to reverse deforestation. Prosopis juliflora is a robust plant that grows rapidly and has become one of the worst invasive plants in many parts of the world. The shrub now occupies millions of hectares on the African continent, including countries such as Mali, Chad, Niger, Ethiopia, Sudan and Kenya.

 

they recommended to carefully study possible effects before introducing exotic plants   

 

please see https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170705104132.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fhealth_medicine%2Fmalaria+(Malaria+News+--+ScienceDaily)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When malaria parasites invade red blood cells, they form an internal compartment in which they replicate many times before bursting out of the cell and infecting more cells. In order to escape red blood cells, the parasites have to break through both the internal compartment and the cell membrane using various proteins and enzymes.Scientists at the Francis Crick Institute and The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine have identified a key protein involved in this process. 

 

report continues  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170706143103.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fhealth_medicine%2Fmalaria+(Malaria+News+--+ScienceDaily)

 

they are working on interrupting this process with a view to developing medication

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 A new study  using mice models has shown that the infectious agent responsible for malaria, the Plasmodium parasite, is able to to sense and actively adapt to the host's nutritional status.

 

report continues https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170705133031.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fhealth_medicine%2Fnutrition+(Nutrition+News+--+ScienceDaily)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scientists discover that two thirds of the malaria parasite's genes are essential for normal growth, meaning there are many more possible drug targets than previously thought

 

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170713154942.htm

 

looks like any chance of elimating malaria is going down with the decreased funding

 

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170714140249.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It turns out that the dangerous insects like appealing smells  .

 

some researchers  collected the scent of flowers and other plants that produce nectar ,then took out anything that might attract  bees .  Combining these compounds with insecticides such as pyrethroids or spinosad led to highly effective formulations.

 

The resulting product, which is called Vectrax, is a slow-release formula for use indoors or outdoors. It can be applied  very selectively in places where the targeted insects will visit 

 

a field trial in Tanzania has shown  found that mosquito populations plunged by two-thirds in just two weeks in Vetrax-treated communities compared to untreated ones.

 

American Chemical Society. "Mosquitoes fatally attracted to deadly, sweet-smelling potion." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 August 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170823090939.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2017, August 23). Mosquitoes fatally attracted to deadly, sweet-smelling potion. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 28, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170823090939.htm
American Chemical Society. "Mosquitoes fatally attracted to deadly, sweet-smelling potion." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170823090939.htm (accessed August 28, 2017).
 
this is promising

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


© 2006 - 2017 www.safaritalk.net - Talking Safaris and African Wildlife Conservation since 2006. Passionate about Africa.