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madaboutcheetah

Give me some examples of Centre-weighted vs Matrix metering?

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I mean in what instances would you use the two options?

 

If the subject is in a heavy shadow - would you ideally use Centre-weighted?

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@@madaboutcheetah

I confess that I never use centre-weighted.

Sometimes I use spot metering if the subject is small and the background is very different (light or dark). (or on a night drive where there is a spotlight and matrix will probably struggle)

Most of the time I use matrix (evaluative) and then dial in exposure compensation. Usually compensation is needed for birds in trees, dark animals with light background, ligh animals with dark backgrounds

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As of two years ago we have our Nikon camera(s) (previous D7100 and now D7200) set on centre weighted. I am more than please with the results. That goes for wildlife shooting when the subject is usually only a fraction of the total view.

For difficult situations (heavy shadows and bright spots around) spot, and for yet another situations exposure compensation.

 

Used Matrix exclusively before. Yet I think both are good metering systems if used properly.

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I am the reverse of @@xelas. I had always used centre-weighted until I was told by a professional photographer to use evaluative. I can't for the life of me remember why though.....

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I have a question though:

 

With modern lenses, spot metering is coupled to the active focus point. Is this also true for center-weighted?

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Posted (edited)

I have a question though:

 

With modern lenses, spot metering is coupled to the active focus point. Is this also true for center-weighted?

 

In Nikon cameras at least, center-weighted is exactly that: it gives extra weight (75%) to the center of the image and the remaining 25% to the surrounding area. In most nikon cameras you can specify the size of the center that you want from 6-12mm I think. It is NOT coupled to the focus point...that would be spot metering.

 

To answer the original question, I used to use center-weighted a lot, especially for small perched birds (which would often only fill the center of my frame), but since the Nikon D810 I have been using it much less because Nikon unfortunately removed the little switch (that was on the D300/D300s/D800) that made it extremely easy and quick to switch between metering modes. Now, on the D810 and D500 you need to do a two hand process to switch the modes and I find it so cumbersome that I rarely switch out of matrix. Honestly I haven't noticed much difference, as I think Nikon's Matrix is usually good, with compensation as required.

 

I do however sometimes use spot and especially the new highlight-weighted metering, which is very useful with white birds--when I remember. I really miss that mechanical switch!

Edited by janzin
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