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Photographic Maps for the Primates, Warthogs and Hyraxes of Africa

Photographic map primates warthog hyrax africa biogeography

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#1 WildSolutions

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 05:43 PM

The design and implementation of effective conservation measures for primates, warthogs and hyraxes requires an efficient, low cost, and accessible resource for the identification of species and subspecies. Although photographs cannot replace an adequate museum collection as a resource for assessing species variation, geotagged photographs are a relatively fast, inexpensive, convenient, and unobtrusive means for detecting and assessing phenotypic variation within a species/subspecies over large areas. The use of photographs to document phenotypic characters will become increasingly important as the collection of specimens for hands-on assessments becomes ever more difficult. 

 

img7786.jpg

Adult male eastern patas monkey Erythrocebus patas pyrrhonotus, Kidepo Valley National Park, Uganda.
Photograph by Yvonne A. de Jong & Thomas M. Butynski, Eastern Africa Primate Diversity and Conservation Program, wildsolutions.nl

 

Our 14 newly up-graded on-line photographic maps (or ‘PhotoMaps’; www.wildsolutions.nl), with over 2400 images (September 2016) of African primates, warthogs and hyraxes, together with the latest distribution maps, provide insight into each taxon’s phenotypic characters, diversity and biogeography. These ‘living’ collections of geotagged images are a practical tool for documenting and discussing diversity, taxonomy, biogeography, distribution and conservation status and, therefore, for planning actions for conservation.

 

dejongbutynskig.gallarummeru13.jpg

Adult Somali lesser galago Galago gallarum, Meru National Park, Kenya.
Photograph by Yvonne A. de Jong & Thomas M. Butynski, Eastern Africa Primate Diversity and Conservation Program, wildsolutions.nl

 

 

PhotoMaps are useful to those who want to:

  • identify species/subspecies
  • know which species/subspecies occur in which areas;
  • obtain species/subspecies photographs
  • confirm species distribution
  • describe variation within a species/subspecies, especially as it relates to geographic distribution​·  

 

If you have photographs of African primates, warthogs or hyraxes from the less documented areas of Africa (i.e., gaps on the PhotoMaps), please consider contributing them to the PhotoMaps. The photographers name is attached to each photograph. Anyone wishing to use a PhotoMap photograph must obtain both permission and the photograph from the photographer.  

 

Send your photographs, and the coordinates and/or place name of the site where the photographs were obtained, to yvonne@wildsolutions.nl 

We thank Arnoud de Jong for his technical expertise and great help with the PhotoMaps.

 

http://www.wildsolut...raphy/photomap/

 

dejongbutynskidesertwarthogsamburunr17.j

Adult male desert warthog Phacochoerus aethiopicus, Samburu National Reserve, Kenya.
Photograph by Yvonne A. de Jong & Thomas M. Butynski, Eastern Africa Primate Diversity and Conservation Program, wildsolutions.nl

 

 


Edited by WildSolutions, 20 October 2016 - 05:53 PM.

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#2 Peter Connan

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 03:58 AM

Fantastic resource you are developing here!


Ek oefen skelm.

#3 WildSolutions

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 04:10 AM

Thank you Peter!



#4 pault

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 05:23 AM

How precise does the location have to be. For example if I could say something was taken in Serengeti National Park, that would probably be too vague? Would Central Serengeti be precise enough? Would South Central Serengeiti be better? Would South Central Serengeti near to Duma Camp be better still ? What I mean is at what point of vagueness does a location become a bit useless and at what point of precision (short of GPS coordinates which are obviously perfect for both sides if available) does it become unnecesarily detailed because e.g. the pictures are going to show as essentially the same location anyway?

 

Reason asked - so people don't waste unnecesary effort and so people don't feel they shouldn't make what might be a valuable contribution because they don't have a precise enough location.

 

Also, what iif I have pictures of 40 different hyraxes from the same location (submit all 40 or just the 1 will do)?

And what if I visit the same location multiple years and have multiple photos from different years? Submit one for each year? All that I have? Just one for the location?

 

And finally, say I see a  primate in what I know to be an unexpected location? Should i prioritise that one over the others of different primates in that location that I expected to see there? Or would that actually be a bad thing to do?

 

Cool maps and I am hoping this catches on.


Waiting again... for the next time again


#5 WildSolutions

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 06:56 AM

Dear Pault, thank you for your message and your kind support! 

 

Thank you for asking! The more detailed the location the better, but if all you can recall of an image is for example central-south Serengeti NP than that is useful too, particularly if the images are good and from an area we have no images from yet. Coordinates are certainly best but i realize that not all images are geotagged or recorded in your GPS so..... 

 

As for the amount of images ....what we are after is good images which show diversity within both sexes of all ages....or images which show interesting behaviour or habitat. If you have one (less good) image of an area which we have no photos from we will post it.  If you send 40 from one site than we pick a few which serve the purpose of the maps best (diversity, location and behaviour). Yes good images from areas which are new to the map are ideal indeed! 

 

As for image size....medium resolution (between 200 - 1000 KB).

 

Again, thank you for your support! Yvonne  :)


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#6 pault

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 07:29 AM

Okay I get the principle clearly now.


Waiting again... for the next time again






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