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In which countries worldwide is it forbidden to wear camouflage clothing?

Camouflage illegal forbidden outlawed clothing

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48 replies to this topic

#1 Dave Williams

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 12:56 PM

I'm heading to Namibia next year and wondered if it's permissible to wear camouflage there? The only country I have visited so far that doesn't allow, at least as far as I'm aware, is Barbados but perhaps there are more to add to the list.



#2 Wild Dogger

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 01:37 PM

You can wear everything you like in Namibia.


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#3 pault

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 06:29 AM

You have orange and white (Etosha) outfits? .

 

Hmmm... actually I am pretty sure camouflage is probably still illegal in a number of countries in Africa. How far the law is enforced is another matter. It certainly used to be strongly discouraged or illegal in a lot of African countries. Nowadays some sources say/said  it is illegal for country X but then I  know people wear it and have no issues. Others refer to "known" issues and "trouble at borders" but I can't say I know of anything really specific that wasn't set back in cold war times. It's definitely unusual to see anyone except actual paramilirtary people wearing  camouflage in e.g.Kenya, but it's not unknown.

 

In other words, I am pretty sure there is a grey area around this in a lot of countries. Peopel will say different things and they may both actually be right. Personally,  unless I was sure in the positive, I'd consider the risk of sticking out like a sore thumb and unintentionally looking like white paramilitary (or British military in parts of Kenya) that is not necessarily a good look to have. I'd wear something ellse.. But yes, I would imagine you can out in the bush - maybe just avoid it on the roads or near towns to be safe?

 

Of course if it was desert camo trousers with a pink t-shirt and yellow suspenders  that'd be a different story. That's a look!

 

One thing you might want to consider (and if you want to rise above it I kind of admire that) is that a number of fellow tourists (percentage depending on location) will believe that it is illegal and therefore will think not very well of you for "dissing the culture". You may get  virtual hisses and boos. Or maybe they'll think you're white paramiliatary too and ask you when the coup is so they can get out before.


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#4 madaboutcheetah

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 06:48 AM

It's not encouraged in Botswana ........... @pault is correct - I think I read something along those lines.......... I've seldom seen anyone on safari in Africa wearing camo gear (In India, it's common practice tho)


Edited by madaboutcheetah, 21 October 2016 - 06:48 AM.

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#5 JulieM

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 07:24 AM

It's illegal in Zimbabwe apparently

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#6 pault

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 07:38 AM

And if we're talking something like faux-camo ladies shorts from from Esprit, I really think it's not an issue. I am guessing we are talking something like a special pair of camo trousers with lots of handy pockets for photo gear.....but perhaps I shoulod not assume.


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#7 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 08:03 AM

it is not a good look regardless  of the law

 

I don't want to look like  I am a poacher ,armed  rebel, military and no more recently terrorist


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#8 Kingfisher Safaris

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 08:22 AM

It is illegal to wear camouflage clothes in pretty much all African countries, I highly recommend that you don not do this as you are risking arrest and in many cases imprisonment.  


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#9 Geoff

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 09:15 AM

@Dave Williams  Why would you want to wear camouflage attire anyway?


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#10 Wild Dogger

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 05:09 PM

Sorry, I confused camouflage with khaki (it´s not my language)


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Safaris and Ketchup are similar, sometimes you shake the bottle of Ketchup and nothing comes out, you shake and shake and shake and all of a sudden everything pops out.
So donīt stop shaking the bottle, thereīs a lot inside.

#11 Dave Williams

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 03:44 PM

@Dave Williams  Why would you want to wear camouflage attire anyway?

So I can't be quite so noticeable !

Camouflage isn't a look I have ever been totally comfortable with in public places but it helps hugely if you want to try and get wildlife to approach closer to enable better photographs. I'm thinking birds mainly. I wouldn't see much point in wearing typical camouflage patterns if I am sat in a car.
My camouflage jacket is lightweight, rainproof and very tear resistant as well as inexpensive

Edited by Dave Williams, 23 October 2016 - 03:56 PM.


#12 Geoff

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 09:53 PM

@Dave Williams   I do a lot of bird photography and never wear camouflage gear.

 

Years ago in Zimbabwe I was chatting to a Ndbele tracker when I guy got out of a vehicle wearing full camouflage gear. I asked the tracker what he thought and his response was enlightening. 

 

The tracker said "That guy looks like a village idiot and I should know as I live in a village. Humans think birds and animals see as we do but that is not true and they also use other senses to look out for trouble. To use clothing like that successfully you have to lie in wait but if you're moving around it is a waste of time." 

 

The tracker used to be a subsistence poacher (b4 becoming a tracker) and his family's lives depended on what he could bring home for food.

 

I'd add from my experience that urbanised humans are the most unobservant & unaware creatures on the planet and your camouflage gear probably works quite well with them.


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#13 ZaminOz

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 04:52 AM

I'm not sure if it is technically illegal to wear camouflage in Zambia (because I sometimes see people wearing the occasional one piece of cammo clothing), but I would not recommend that adults deck themselves out in full camouflage in Zambia. One it is unnecessary for game viewing, and two you may get a soldier or policeman take offence and cause you some totally avoidable trouble.

 

It is probably ok for kids to get away with cammo cap or shorts, but I wouldn't advise it for adults (especially not in towns or near anything strategic or linked to the president).


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#14 pault

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 05:46 AM

@Dave Williams  Why would you want to wear camouflage attire anyway?

So I can't be quite so noticeable !
Camouflage isn't a look I have ever been totally comfortable with in public places but it helps hugely if you want to try and get wildlife to approach closer to enable better photographs. I'm thinking birds mainly. I wouldn't see much point in wearing typical camouflage patterns if I am sat in a car.
My camouflage jacket is lightweight, rainproof and very tear resistant as well as inexpensive

My experience is similar to Geoff's but you'd need desert camo for most of Namibia anyway, and even then you'd stick out against the red earth in many places (unless you rolled in it first). Generally speaking, I think you'll find you can get closer to birds in a vehicle than you ever could on foot and water and food is so scarce in Namibia in the dry that all you really need to do is sit quietly by a waterhole or bird bath or tree with food on it and they'll come to you. Hiding in plain sight can work quite well. Camps and lodges are usually great for fairly habituated birds.

@Wild Dogger. I wondered but your English is so good I didn't dare ask.

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#15 Dave Williams

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 07:36 AM

Some interesting responses to a simple question, and some that haven't it seems read mine.
I said I wasn't comfortable wearing camouflage in public places, I wear it while waiting for birds to approach me not to stalk them. It is effective in breaking up your out line if you are in an appropriate environment. Good point about the red sand but I'm not heading there anyway though I don't know what the places I will be going to are like either.I am going Rhino tracking and I have read that dark clothing is better. That too is a form of camouflage gear.
In the park I am obviously going to be sat in a vehicle but other places not so. There probably won't be any water holes and in actual fact My first trip will be in the wet season. How wet I'm not sure as I have yet to experience it.
I won't take my camouflage gear with me, I wouldn't want to upset anyone in Namibia and I'm obviously aware of the activity of poachers and terrorists in many parts of Africa. Wouldn't want anyone to think that I am one.
Now, as an aside, here,s another question.
Can I wear Lycra if I hire a bike?

#16 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 07:47 AM

  • dark coloured  clothing is a good way to not stand out without giving the messages that military camof patterns could imply
  • Lycra  would ok, but it could make you much hotter  if  it is already warm, so do an online search for temperature
  • camof  is something definitely to avoid for Kenya  unless you want to get possibly a whole lot more security checks
  • camof gear  gives added meanings that is best to avoid
  • it is reasonably common  to wear green, brown etc, guides wear it, it is sometimes called safari dress code

Edited by COSMIC RHINO, 24 October 2016 - 08:18 AM.

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#17 ZaminOz

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 02:51 AM

@Dave Williams the only thing that a Welshman could do to really upset the natives in Africa is to put on a scarlet tunic and start singing "Men of Harlech" ;)


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#18 pault

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 06:21 AM

@Dace Williams  Lycra? Can we start another thread for that? I would like to see "Lycra on safari?" as a topic. Nothing wrong with it for cycling though - would be a really nice country for cycling actually

 .


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#19 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 07:56 AM

  • the only people who should be in camof  are security staff or UN peace keeping forces 

 

 

  • lycra ,the practical  considerations are  if it will be comfortable in the temperature  and if thorns will damage it

Edited by COSMIC RHINO, 25 October 2016 - 08:10 AM.

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#20 Dave Williams

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 08:16 AM

I was thinking of wearing Lycra in case I have to make a run for it whilst on the Rhino tracking too. Should enable me to cover 100m in 5 minutes less. :)


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