Jump to content




See all Safaritalk Special Offers

Message to Guests.

Welcome to Safaritalk where we have been talking Safaris and wildlife conservation since 2006. As a guest you're welcome to read through certain areas of the forum, but to access all the facilities and to contribute your experience, ask questions and get involved, you'll need to be a member - so register here: it's quick, free and easy and I look forward to having you as a Safaritalker soon. Matt.


Photo

Namibia - Advice for Etosha accommodation?

namibia etosha

  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 LarsS

LarsS

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Local time: 02:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 09 October 2016 - 07:23 PM

I'm heading for Namibia in a few weeks and can't make up my mind. So if any of you can help me out, that would be much appreciated!

 

The itinerary will ofcourse include Etosha. It's the national park which gives me headaches. I have max 4 nights to spend. But where? At first I thought of Okaukuejo and Halali. But I've been reading these camps are quite large and can get crowded by overlanders. Then I switched to Onkoshi, as it's much smaller, but from there it's too far to Swakopmund. I've also been reading wildlife at Okaukuejo is great and that this makes up for the size of the camp.

 

If the latter is true, should I spend all 4 of my nights at Okaukuejo? Or should I go for 2 nights at Okaukuejo and 2 nights at Halali? Or are there private concessions at the south(west) of Etosha I could consider? In the end, I'm there for the animals, but usually I like smaller camps...

 

 

If you're interested, I'll also be going to see the seals near Swakopmond and visit Sossusvlei. Some other activities (sandboarding, balloon flight) in that area, but will decide when I'm there. TR will follow afterwards.



#2 dlo

dlo

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 473 posts
  • Local time: 08:47 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 10 October 2016 - 12:57 AM

Ok first the easy stuff, sandboarding and quad biking are a blast and you should do it. We did a boat trip to see seals and dolphins which we also enjoyed.

 

The waterholes at Okaukuejo and Halali are great and are worth the crowds. We saw loads of rhinos and ele's and it was a constant procession of animals all day and night. We got lucky as we had no overlanders and people who were there were well behaved.We spent 2 nights at Ongava but it was pretty quiet there so for me it was much better in the park.

 

Hope this helps.



#3 Swazicar

Swazicar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Local time: 07:47 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Category 1:Resident in Africa/Former resident
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 10 October 2016 - 02:05 AM

You can find quieter accommodation outside Etosha, but it's best to stay in the park, in my opinion, as that puts you a shorter drive to morning and evening viewing.  (And, if staying at the Etosha camps, you can just walk over to the waterhole a few times per evening to see what's happening.)

 

Yes, Okaukeujo is busy; it's not an exclusive, "high-end" experience.  But, if you go with the right frame of mind, you likely will enjoy it.  Just make sure to make a reservation for evening supper.

 

I've not been to Onkoshi, but I have a friend who stayed there a few years ago; it was his favorite camp (for the setting) on his South Africa-Namibia-Botswana trip.

 

If you're going to the eastern end of the park, you might consider two nights at Namutoni, then two at Okaukuejo.  Or, if you're not, and if you want to have a shorter drive to the coast after your last night, you could do three nights at Okaukuejo and then one night at Dolomite (which we liked).

 

If you really want my opinion, it would be to drop Swakopmund and replace it with something else, but it's probably too late for that.

 

Lastly, if you're not already familiar with it, this is a good resource for planning visits to waterholes:  https://www.amazon.c...k/dp/B00C8SJHIS  I put it on a small tablet and it was quite handy to have with us.

 

Enjoy your trip!

 

-tom a.

 

 



#4 LarsS

LarsS

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Local time: 02:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 10 October 2016 - 12:50 PM

@dlo yes, sandboarding is on my list. I've read your TR a while ago and that's one of the reasons for it. Also because your Arsenal shirt proves you're a wise man ;-) Good to hear the people were well behaved. I was thinking about Ongava, but had some doubts regarding to distance to the park and how wildlife there should be. Now I'll go by your and @Swazicar 's advice and stick to the NP. Thanks!

 

 

@Swazicar Thanks for your info as well. How is the wildlife around Dolomite camp?

 

About Swakopmund, why should we avoid that? Is Walvisbaai a better place to stay? Or other suggestions at the coast? It's not too late to switch plans. We haven't made any reservations and will just plan day by day after leaving Etosha and arrange things along the way. Regarding km's, I want to drive a route like Windhoek-Etosha-Swakopmund/coast area-Sossusvlei-Windhoek.

 

I hadn't heard of that book yet, but it looks like it's quite handy to make the most of our visit. Thanks!


  • dlo likes this

#5 buddy4344

buddy4344

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Local time: 10:47 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pennsylvania, USA
  • Category 1:Wildlife Photographer/Artist
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 10 October 2016 - 06:06 PM

I have the mentioned book.  Looks good as it gives distance, angle of sunrise, sunset, general game expected, etc.

 

I had a similar angst in planning my Oct. trip in a few weeks.  I settled on 2 nights Okaukuejo as it seems to have the most photogenic water hole and 2 nights at Halali as that lodge is smaller, but the water hole looks less photogenic for night photography.  I have NO FIRST HAND EXPERIENCE.  In November, I can speak from experience.  Can't wait. :)



#6 Swazicar

Swazicar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Local time: 07:47 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Category 1:Resident in Africa/Former resident
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 10 October 2016 - 08:26 PM

@LarsS See coments below

 

@Swazicar Thanks for your info as well. How is the wildlife around Dolomite camp?

 

Dolomite has a waterhole, but it's visible only from (I believe) two chalets at the camp (the camp is on a hill, and only the last two chalets on one corner of the hill have a direct sight line to the waterhole; it's also quite far away).  There are quite a few waterholes on the drive to Dolomite (both the north and the south routes), so I think it's worth visiting.  However, it is a long drive from Okaukuejo and, if you're in a hurry, you could get wherever you're going faster if you drive outside the park.  Likewise, I prefer mult-night stays to one-night stays, so to go for only one night may not be a good use of time.

 

About Swakopmund, why should we avoid that? Is Walvisbaai a better place to stay? Or other suggestions at the coast? It's not too late to switch plans. We haven't made any reservations and will just plan day by day after leaving Etosha and arrange things along the way. Regarding km's, I want to drive a route like Windhoek-Etosha-Swakopmund/coast area-Sossusvlei-Windhoek.

 

Entirely personal bias:  I just don't like "developed" parts of developing countries; I'd much rather be in rural areas.  Also, I don't like activities like quad biking, driving dune buggies across the sand, etc.  There are a lot of things to do in/around Swakopmund, and many tourists who go to Namibia do go there and do have a great time (especially those who love internal combustion engines); it's just not for me.  I said on another forum that I've been there twice, in 1986 and in 2015, and that once every 29 years is enough for me.

 

Regarding your route, many people prefer to go in the opposite direction (clockwise instead of anti-clockwise), so that Etosha ("the highlight") is near the end of the trip.  Just something to consider, if you haven't already.

 

-tom a.


Edited by Swazicar, 10 October 2016 - 08:30 PM.


#7 LarsS

LarsS

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Local time: 02:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 11 October 2016 - 01:59 PM

Thanks again @buddy4344 and @Swazicar

 

I think I'm gonna go with 2 nights Okaukuejo and 2 nights Halali; availability permitting ofcourse. I prefer multinight stays as well and Dolomite doesn't look as interesting as the other camps for 2 nights. It also saves a bit of driving in the park from A to B when leaving out Dolomite and Nakutomi/Onkoshi, which means more time for actual game drives.

 

@buddy4344 I just found your northern Namibia October topic from a few months ago. I overlooked it browsing the forum, some useful tips already posted there. I see Antee mentioning Halali's waterhole is fantastic at night.

 

I'm wondering how our experiences will compare to each other, as we're around the same time in Etosha. Looking forward for your TR if you're planning to post one. Enjoy your trip!

 

 

@Swazicar I can understand why you're not that much into Swakopmund. For me it's not a reason to skip it. It looks like a good place to see the seals and do some sandboarding, at the same time I like to visit a town as well as it offers another experience from the bush. But who know, maybe my next visit will be in 2045 ;-)

I know people like to save Etosha for the end of their trip. But I prefer it at the beginning of my trip. First, when going to Africa, I just cannot wait to go and see wildlife. If I put Etosha near the end of my trip, it will feel like a long journey to get there. I just need that shot of seeing wildlife. Second, I can plan my Etosha trip without me having to take into account which other places I want to visit and for how long. Depending on experience and other plans, it gives me the possibility to extend my stay at Etosha if I'd want to. But mostly, I just can not wait to go there :-)


  • buddy4344 likes this

#8 Swazicar

Swazicar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Local time: 07:47 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Category 1:Resident in Africa/Former resident
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 11 October 2016 - 02:51 PM

@LarsS

I know people like to save Etosha for the end of their trip. But I prefer it at the beginning of my trip. First, when going to Africa, I just cannot wait to go and see wildlife. If I put Etosha near the end of my trip, it will feel like a long journey to get there. I just need that shot of seeing wildlife. Second, I can plan my Etosha trip without me having to take into account which other places I want to visit and for how long. Depending on experience and other plans, it gives me the possibility to extend my stay at Etosha if I'd want to. But mostly, I just can not wait to go there :-)

 

This is a good plan.  If you love it, and if room is available, you could always add a day or two more in Etosha, or in someplace like Damaraland, which we loved.  (That's the kind of time trade-off I alluded to above:  for us, we'd spend more time in Damaraland (or Kaokoland, where we've not been) and less time on the developed portion of the coast.)

 

If you're driving to Swakopmund anyway, taking a slight detour to Cape Cross for the seals is worth a few hours of your time, in my opinion.  (I wouldn't necessarily drive all the way to the coast just to see them, however.)  Just be prepared to see for a fair number of dead babies.

 

-tom a.



#9 Kingfisher Safaris

Kingfisher Safaris

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 497 posts
  • Local time: 02:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United Kingdom
  • Category 1:Lodge Owner/Manager
  • Category 2:Bush pilot

Posted 11 October 2016 - 03:41 PM

@LarsS

I would like to throw in a little spanner into the works. You won't be disappointed in Okakuejo but the Halali accommodation is a little run-down (the standard chalets) but the waterhole is fantastic. Onkoshi though is just stunning in terms of location and i was lucky enough to see Cheetah reasonably close by in 2015 and there are some good waterholes close by too, if you come from Windhoek go here first and then to Okakuejo and that cuts out any driving distance issues. I would say definitely go to Swakopmund, it is worth it and there is lots to do, if that is the sort of thing you would like to do and it is quite a pretty town but yes perhaps only one visit is worthwhile. You can always visit the bird sanctuary in Walvis Bay, which is great to see and the Seals at Cape Cross are also worth a visit. There's lots of accommodation in and around the dunes at Sossusvlei but the best place to stay is probably Kulala Desert Lodge as they have their own access to the park and you won't have to queue to get in in the morning and will likely be the first at the Dunes. You can book them for special self-drive rates. 

 

Whatever you choose to do i don't think Namibia will disappoint.

 

Here's a couple of photos of Onkoshi and my incredibly luck Cheetah sighting.

 

WP_20150524_002.jpg

 

WP_20150524_003.jpg

 

DSC_0710.JPG

 

DSC_0718.JPG

 

DSC_0729.JPG

 

 


  • pault, Peter Connan and LarsS like this

Martin Smith - martin@kingfishersafaris.co.uk

Managing Director

Kingfisher Safaris

Facebook

 

Kingfisher Expeditions Facebook

gallery_17608_756_9485.jpg


#10 LarsS

LarsS

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Local time: 02:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 12 October 2016 - 07:22 AM

@Kingfisher Safaris now you're making me doubt again :) Onkoshi indeed looks great and that cheetah sighting with two cubs, that's amazing! I wish I'll see cheetah cubs one day. But do you have an idea how long it will take from Onkoshi to Okaukuejo? It's about 170km, which means driving maximum speed (60km/h I believe) it will take 3 hrs, without stops for wildlife or loop drives. So my guess is it will take a full day, 6-8hrs if you wanna enjoy the wildlife as well? It feels a bit too much for me personally.

 

Kulala lodge with own entry to the park sounds like a good plan voor Sossusvlei. I'll definitely will contact them, as being at the dunes first surely must be the best experience.

 

 

@Swazicar I was suspecting there would be a lot of dead babies. I've read somewhere there are 80,000 babies born every month, with a peak in nov-dec of 250,000 during 30 days. I realise not every seal can survive these circumstances.



#11 Swazicar

Swazicar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Local time: 07:47 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Category 1:Resident in Africa/Former resident
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 13 October 2016 - 04:36 AM

 But do you have an idea how long it will take from Onkoshi to Okaukuejo? It's about 170km, which means driving maximum speed (60km/h I believe) it will take 3 hrs, without stops for wildlife or loop drives. So my guess is it will take a full day, 6-8hrs if you wanna enjoy the wildlife as well? It feels a bit too much for me personally.

 

 

 

@LarsS I would plan on it taking essentially a full day.  Typically, you'd be up at dawn in order to get on the road as early as you're allowed to be outside camp.  If I were driving it, I'd arrange the drive such that I'd arrive at Okaukuejo just before dark, when they close the gate.  In between, you'd visit waterholes along the way.  Alternatively, you could arrive in Okaukuejo around mid-day, rest for an hour or two, then go back out for the last few hours of daylight.

 

On the drive to Okaukuejo, you could stop at places like Nuamses:

 

28779423242_2dff82c8bf_b.jpg

 

And for an evening drive, you could head north of Okaukuejo to Okondeka:

 

28852826956_9774050bc0_b.jpg

 

Just a thought.


  • Kingfisher Safaris and LarsS like this

#12 LarsS

LarsS

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Local time: 02:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 13 October 2016 - 08:04 AM

Thanks for the nice pictures @Swazicar I'm really looking forward to have similar sightings :)

 

I have asked for availability in all three camps. So I'm just waiting now if I can choose or if the choice will be made for me.

 

 

Another question: would you recommend the game drives organised by the camps? Do they have good guides? Do they use (open?) cars or trucks? I will do some game drives by my self. It would be nice if they offer good game drives and you can just sit, look around and enjoy.



#13 Swazicar

Swazicar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Local time: 07:47 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Category 1:Resident in Africa/Former resident
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 13 October 2016 - 02:46 PM

Another question: would you recommend the game drives organised by the camps? Do they have good guides? Do they use (open?) cars or trucks? I will do some game drives by my self. It would be nice if they offer good game drives and you can just sit, look around and enjoy.

@LarsS

 

We didn't go on any organized drives, so most of what follows is just speculation.

 

I'm sure the guides/drivers the park uses know better than we where and when to go to specific places.  That said, and especially in the dry season, much of what one is doing is driving from waterhole to waterhole (or borehole to borehole), parking, and then waiting for something to show up (assuming nothing is there when you arrive).  In my opinion, the driving part is quite easy.

 

Some waterholes (and the areas around those waterholes) are known for specific patterns of activity (type of animal, time of day, etc.), which the guides would certainly be very familiar with.  That's probably the main advantage of doing a guided tour (but again, I'm speculating).

 

That said, the book I mentioned in an earlier post includes a fair number of very specific observations about animal tendencies around specific water sources.  For example, I went to the Okondeka water hole (where the lion photo above was taken) specifically because the book's author described (quite accurately, it turns out) when and where the lions appear in the late afternoon.  I basically just sat in my car along the road and waited for them to show up.   The camps also have books in which tourists record what they saw and when they saw it, so you can check those as well.

 

I do like having access to the extra knowledge that a guide brings but, in the case of Etosha, I'm not disappointed that we never used one.  I think there may be a possibility of guided night drives, so that could be something to look into, as you can't drive yourself at night.  Likewise, you could always do at least one guided drive, just for a change of pace.

 

My recollection is foggy, but I think the park vehicles were open-topped, but I'm not 100% certain, so take that with a very large grain of salt.  (Someone who has actually gone on a guided drive there may chime in, so I'll stop my speculation now.)

 

-tom a.



#14 LarsS

LarsS

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Local time: 02:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 14 October 2016 - 08:43 AM

@Swazicar thanks again for all your information. Always nice if patience pays off, and lions do show up where you've been waiting. I'll make sure I have a copy of the book.

 

A little update from my side, it turns out that availability decided when and where to go. Maybe a bit naïve, but I didn't expect it to sell out already. I've read somewhere (not on ST) that accommodation in Etosha in november never gets fully booked. It turns out it does. Our tickets to Namibia were a bit of an impulse buy. Afterwards we didn't had much time to prepare our trip due to being to busy at work. I know we left it late, but I expected it not to be a big deal.

 

Long story short, our route will be clockwise, saving Etosha as our final destination. We're staying three nights at Okaukuejo (one night in the premier waterhole chalet). The other option was Halali, but based on your advice I believe Okaukuejo is the preferred option. I've said I wanted four nights in total, but that just wasn't possible anymore. All accommodations the night before are sold out.

I'll probably stay one night at Ongava Lodge or Andersson's camp. An afternoon gamedrive on arrival and depending on sightings, we go for an early morning drive as well in Ongava or head directly to Etosha so we're basically already a full day in the park.

 

Apart from not being able to extend our stay at Etosha, which probably wouldn't have been possible availability wise, I can see benefits of clockwise. We were skipping Damaraland as we thought we'd like to spend more days around Swakopmund and Sossusvlei. But if we would like to spend less days there, we might try to book last minute 1 or 2 nights at Damaraland.

 

 

 

 

Thanks everyone for providing me with information to help me make decisions. You've been a great help! :)



#15 LarsS

LarsS

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Local time: 02:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 18 October 2016 - 07:34 AM

@Kingfisher Safaris You're right about Kulala, it really looks amazing! Especially the bedroom underneath the stars. I've asked them for availability, if so, def going to spend the night there. It's pretty expensive, so we'll use it on arrival and go the next day to the dunes and vlei. Then we're going some place a bit more affordable for the second night. But it really is an accommodation I wouldn't want to miss. Thanks for the advice!


  • Kingfisher Safaris likes this

#16 Kingfisher Safaris

Kingfisher Safaris

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 497 posts
  • Local time: 02:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United Kingdom
  • Category 1:Lodge Owner/Manager
  • Category 2:Bush pilot

Posted 18 October 2016 - 11:32 AM

@LarsS Yes it is expensive but a great experience. Make sure you get the right rate quoted as there are cheaper prices for self-drive which is only Dinner, Bed & Breakfast but no activities. Also make sure you are allowed access to the park through their gate if you are self-driving on the DBB rate, otherwise you have some distance out of their reserve to the main gate. Also be aware that if you want to park right next to the Big Dunes then you will need a 4x4 for the last sand section, otherwise there is a tractor with a trailer that takes you from the non-4x4 car park. 


  • LarsS likes this

Martin Smith - martin@kingfishersafaris.co.uk

Managing Director

Kingfisher Safaris

Facebook

 

Kingfisher Expeditions Facebook

gallery_17608_756_9485.jpg


#17 MR1980

MR1980

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 106 posts
  • Local time: 03:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:Wildlife Photographer/Artist

Posted 18 October 2016 - 12:56 PM

You probably won't regret your 3 nights at Okaukuejo @LarsS, the waterhole is pretty awesome. Saw lots of blackies in 2014, up to 11 at a time. You could just sit there all day and relax...

 

Groetjes,

 

Michel


  • LarsS likes this

© Michel Rademaker Photography

 

FACEBOOK | INSTAGRAM | TWITTER

 


#18 buddy4344

buddy4344

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Local time: 10:47 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pennsylvania, USA
  • Category 1:Wildlife Photographer/Artist
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 01 December 2016 - 02:55 PM

Thanks again @buddy4344 and @Swazicar

 

I think I'm gonna go with 2 nights Okaukuejo and 2 nights Halali; availability permitting ofcourse. I prefer multinight stays as well and Dolomite doesn't look as interesting as the other camps for 2 nights. It also saves a bit of driving in the park from A to B when leaving out Dolomite and Nakutomi/Onkoshi, which means more time for actual game drives.

 

@buddy4344 I just found your northern Namibia October topic from a few months ago. I overlooked it browsing the forum, some useful tips already posted there. I see Antee mentioning Halali's waterhole is fantastic at night.

 

I'm wondering how our experiences will compare to each other, as we're around the same time in Etosha. Looking forward for your TR if you're planning to post one. Enjoy your trip!

 

I will eagerly look forward to your report on your trip.  As for mine, I am going to write a trip report soon, but will say straight up that the night water hole viewing at Halali was beyond expectations. In one night we had a mother and baby black rhino drinking and yet also a pride of lions at the far side of the water hole.  Two other large black rhino came to the hole and the mother rhino let out a loud sound and chased them from the area.  Right after this, the lions started getting too close, so the mother chased the lions.  The lions settled in further away and a few hyena approached the waterhole.  now the lions chased the hyena.  During all of this action, the baby rhino laid down and went to sleep.  For the animals, I guess this was just another day in the bush.  For us, it was high drama!



#19 ice

ice

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,358 posts
  • Local time: 03:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Germany
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:Wildlife Photographer/Artist

Posted 01 December 2016 - 03:18 PM

we had similiar good sightings at Halali's waterhole, a one time lions, elephants and a black rhino were facing each other, later hyenas and even a leopard showed up



#20 buddy4344

buddy4344

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Local time: 10:47 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pennsylvania, USA
  • Category 1:Wildlife Photographer/Artist
  • Category 2:Tourist (regular visitor)

Posted 01 December 2016 - 04:11 PM

You probably won't regret your 3 nights at Okaukuejo @LarsS, the waterhole is pretty awesome. Saw lots of blackies in 2014, up to 11 at a time. You could just sit there all day and relax...

 

Groetjes,

 

Michel

I got some of my most amazing photos at Okaukuejo, but these were before nightfall. Yes, there were rhino at the waterhole at night, but I found the better activity took place in the afternoon and up until sunset.  Regarding the lodge and number of people.  Yes, it is very large with many visitors.  Luckily the waterhole viewing area was extremely wide and easily accommodated all viewers. The Halali viewing area was much smaller and crowded, but the night action was worth it. Food was just acceptable at both. In discussing with my fellow travelers, the Halali experience was more memorable.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: namibia, etosha


© 2006 - 2016 www.safaritalk.net - Talking Safaris and African Wildlife Conservation since 2006. Passionate about Africa.

Welcome guest to Safaritalk.
Please Register or Login to use the full facilities.