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30 replies to this topic

#21 amybatt

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 04:38 PM

Thank you both...

 

How much of IQ is the operator's skill though?  Shooting both the Nikon and the Sony on automatic or Program mode, will I experience a difference?  I mean, I look at some of the photos on here that I can tell are significantly better than mine, then I read in a thread like this and can tell that photo belongs to someone who is extremely knowledgeable about shooting manual mode on a DSLR with a range of lenses, which I doubt I will ever be, and wonder what my end result on something like the Sony will be.
 



#22 Super LEEDS

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 04:47 PM

The lower the f number, the wider the aperture so you're not losing it on the Sony, you're actually getting a wider aperture. I.e. letting more light in.
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#23 Big Andy

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 05:16 PM

Thank you both...

 

How much of IQ is the operator's skill though?  Shooting both the Nikon and the Sony on automatic or Program mode, will I experience a difference?  I mean, I look at some of the photos on here that I can tell are significantly better than mine, then I read in a thread like this and can tell that photo belongs to someone who is extremely knowledgeable about shooting manual mode on a DSLR with a range of lenses, which I doubt I will ever be, and wonder what my end result on something like the Sony will be.
 

 

Most of what you see as better images are not down to using manual settings, they can help in some situations but it's more about slowing down and making sure the camera is steady when you squeeze the shutter button not just point and press. Learn to support the camera from below not with a hand on either side as tends to happen if there is no eye piece and/or you rely on the rear screen. Get the fastest shutter speed you can when not using a tripod or some other support to assist in getting sharp definition then learn a little about post production to make the image pop.



#24 Gilgamesh

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 06:34 PM

Thank you both...
 
How much of IQ is the operator's skill though?  Shooting both the Nikon and the Sony on automatic or Program mode, will I experience a difference?  I mean, I look at some of the photos on here that I can tell are significantly better than mine, then I read in a thread like this and can tell that photo belongs to someone who is extremely knowledgeable about shooting manual mode on a DSLR with a range of lenses, which I doubt I will ever be, and wonder what my end result on something like the Sony will be.

To use a DSLR, youve got to learn about exposure. That is shutter speed, aperture and ISO and what each one does inside out. To fully use a DSLR you've got to be able to manipulate these three to get the desired results.
Many DSLR's have a full auto mode, but IMO it doesn't work as well as in bridge and P&S cameras.

Photography is all about composition (perspective and everything that goes into making a photograph) and light. A properly framed photo with brilliant composition will always be pleasing. You cannot fight the light. It can work in your favor or not. Studio work is obviously all about manipulating light. I am talking about safari photos.

Finally the equipment. Fast, good quality lenses help once you've mastered the above. Fast lenses (low aperture number, f1.4, f2 and even f2.8) in amateurs hands will create worse pictures than P&S. You've got to be able to control depth of focus with those.

Then finally the camera. Print size plays a huge role in what size sensor size you need. I like to blow up my best pictures to about 24X24 or slightly larger and prefer not to hall around a FF camera, and I find APSC size is fine. Any smaller will not suffice. For 5X7 prints and computer viewing 1" sensor should be fine. P&S cannot even get proper isolation and thus is not suitable for any artistic work. They are great for snap shots to document things and so are today's phones.

So, IMO. The equipment doesn't play much role in why the photographs you like are that way. It only played a small role. So, you cannot buy your way into good photography. However, like you said, if you do not want to spend your time, get yourself a good bridge camera and if you are skilled in composition (which is natural for some.....my wife who is not into photography has a better eye than me) your images will be nicer than average.

Edited by Gilgamesh, 14 September 2016 - 06:38 PM.

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#25 AKR1

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 08:55 PM

Perhaps an iPhone 7 is sufficient. See below:

http://appadvice.com...a-review/721710
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#26 pault

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 12:21 AM

Like AKR1 said. If what you have is good enough stick with the smaller sensor. If you are looking for better image quality (bridging closer to a. DSLR) it's a no brainer too! Bigger sensor.

Waiting again... for the next time again


#27 pault

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 12:30 AM

Oh I missed a bit of this thread. It will make a difference regardless, especially in lower light but you should probably be willing to learn to control your camera - especially shutter speed and ISO, as this will result in more consistently clear pictures. Other stuff too, as said, but I am just looking at the very basics.

I think that's an interesting question "why not go back to a phone?" It turns the questions you are asking around a bit. I've yet to see anyone but very skilled photographers do much on safari with a phone, but it's still an interesting thought!

Waiting again... for the next time again


#28 amybatt

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 01:09 PM

I've found that when I'm playing around at home on the beach or traveling otherwise, I have the time and mental acuity to think through the settings and successfully shoot manually and get really satisfactory results.  I don't feel like I have the same ability on safari, especially if something crops up unexpectedly.  Maybe it's mind over matter at that point, I'm away, jetlagged, excited, whatever.  I have spent some time shooting manually and playing with settings, but when it comes down to a pinch and really don't want to miss the shot, I put it in Auto.

Two of my friends on my first safari brought an iPhone, granted it was 2013 and it was likely the iphone 4, and they didn't manage to get many shots at all, especially those when animals were really close, for some reason.  I see a fair number of iPads out there now though, more so than I'd think.


Edited by amybatt, 15 September 2016 - 01:10 PM.


#29 amybatt

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 06:19 PM

@AKR1 and @pault I bit the bullet and got the Sony this morning. I did a ton of research and had an honest conversation with my camera shop. Bottom line I was worried about my Nikon holding up and I didn't want to miss out on either gorillas or the return to the Mara. It is a significant investment but a significant step up too. I have 105 days to learn to use it before the next safari...

Thank you all for your guidance!

Edited by amybatt, 29 October 2016 - 06:20 PM.

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#30 Rockmann

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 06:22 PM

My suggestion would be the Nikon P900 if you want a fantastic optical zoom. My 72 year old Mom has it and her photos have been outstanding. I wish I had it with me on my last trip to Tanzania as a secondary camera.


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#31 TaraMom22

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Posted 05 December 2016 - 10:44 PM

My suggestion would be the Nikon P900 if you want a fantastic optical zoom. My 72 year old Mom has it and her photos have been outstanding. I wish I had it with me on my last trip to Tanzania as a secondary camera.

 

So glad to see this!  My Father-in-law (an avid photographer) recommended the Nikon P900 and I just ordered it for myself for Xmas (will let my husband sign the gift tag :D )    I have a DSLR but did not want to take something that is smarter than me.  I have had my DSLR for about 6 years and love it, but I only shoot on auto, and don't want to be worrying about how to use my camera when I should be enjoying the view.  I knew I wanted a P&S with a good zoom and video, and after way too much reading and research chose the P900.  It isn't even here yet, so hopefully I love it when it arrives.

 

My Father-in-law was so sweet to order me the book EXPLORING THE LIGHT by Rick Sammon.  It seems to be a really good book for inexperienced photographers to get a better understanding of photography.  My Father-in-law keeps teasing me that I need to get a lion costume for the dog and then use her in all kinds of situations and light to practice with my new camera before our trip.







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